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The news inside 

A-7 Editorial . 

B-6 People. 

A-9 Playtime. 

A-2 Sports ... 

B-3 Suburban Living 
Wednesday, May 13, 1987 


Man makes his 
^ living down on 
Belleville farm 


Business. 

Classifieds. 

Church . 

Community Calendar 
Cooking .. 


^ Cook up a 
^ creative party 
with style 


Official Newspaper of Romulus 


Associated Newspapers 



Again Romulus 
volunteer fire fight¬ 
ers battled the 
blazes of three fires 
this week. The latest 
fire forced the eva¬ 
cuation of about 200 
area residents and 
over 1,000 school 
children. Officials 
are investigating the 
blaze. No one was 
injured, according 
to Romulus police. 
ANP photos by Guy War¬ 
ren/staff photographer 


Toxic fumes 

Area schools and residents evacuated 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


A fire which routed students from two Romulus 
schools on Friday, blazed again on Tuesday after¬ 
noon prompting the evacuation of students and near¬ 
by residents. 

Volunteer firefighers who had battled the pallet 
fire on the one-acre site of Mendrick’s Dump near 
Ecorse Road last week, returned to the scene early 
Tuesday afternoon when a fire at the same site was 
reported. 

Romulus Junior High School and Wick 
Elementary School on Wick Road were evacuated 
early Tuesday morning as a result of action by the 
Wayne County Health Department, according to 
assistant environmental health director Bruce 
Davis of the Wayne County Health Department. 

Romulus police also announced that at 12:45 p.m. 
area residents were evacuated from Cogswell Road 
between Ecorse and Tyler, on Tyler Road between 
Shook and Cogswell, on Shook Road between Wick 
and Tyler and Ecorse Road between the railroad 
tracks and Cogswell. 

“We received a call from the school system re¬ 
garding a nuisance odor getting into the ventilation 
system. We reacted to their call and closed the 
schools. Until the problem is resolved the schools 
will stay closed. City officials will give the all clear,” 
Davis said. 

Joel Carr, Romulus Public Schools administrator, 
said Tuesday that school personnel could smell an 
odor and, because of the nature of the fire, they 
feared it could be toxic. “The site of the pallet fire 
was a dump and the health department suggested 
we not take a chance,” Carr said. 

The Red Cross has temporarily established an 
emergency shelter at Mt. Pleasant School for resi¬ 
dents evacuated frjom the vicinity of the blaze, police 
said. 

At 2 p.m, on Tuesday, Mayor Beverly McAnaUy, 
Police Chief Charles Wilmoth, Emergency Pre¬ 
paredness Director Margaret Leduc, Romulus Fire 
Inspector Charles Bradley and officials from the 
Department of Natural Resources and the Environ¬ 
mental Protection Agency were on the scene. 

This is the eighth such fire within the past two 
weeks to strike in the city of Romulus. City officials 
said firefighters are exhausted and $25,000 worth of 



equipment is damaged. Two more fires occurred 
over the weekend. All were pallet fires except for the 
fire at the Romulus Department of Public Works two 
weeks ago, during which stored tires were burned. 

The Romulus City Council passed an emergency 
resolution at the Monday night meeting which 
approved money to pay for the purchase of a new 
pumper and new hoses. The cost is expected to 
amount to $25,000. However the council action didn’t 
arrive soon enough to aid local firefighters 
yesterday. 

Fireman had fought a raging fire for almost 12 
hours at the same site last Friday. According to 
Mayor Prd Tern Mary Ann Banks, the fire smol¬ 
dered all weekend. Banks said the council action 
was necessary “for the health and safety of the com¬ 
munity.” 

On Sunday, Romulus firement were again sum¬ 
moned to the Drysdale and Sons on Middlebelt Road 
where they struggled with two other fire departments 
two weeks ago to extinguish a pallet fire on six acres. 
This time, the firemen were able to control the situa¬ 
tion with four to five hours. “It wasn’t so bad,” fire 
sources said. 

No firefighters have been injured in the series of 
blazes. An official report on the latest fire was not 
available at press time Tuesday. 


BEVERLY 


Police investigate 
murder-suicide 


By TOM MOORADIAN 
ANP Staff Writer 

A 24-year-old Romulus 
woman was shot and killed and 
her 31-year-old male compan¬ 
ion was seriously wounded by 
the woman’s former boyfriend 
who later killed himself, 
according to Romulus police. 

Killed in the shooting was 
Jacqueline Carter, while her 
male companion, Michael Ful¬ 
ler, 31, of Detroit, suffered a 
gun shot wound to the chest. 
Fuller is reported in serious 
condition at Annapolis Hos¬ 
pital. 

Police said the gunman was 
George Lee Sandusky, 34, of In¬ 
kster who took his life after kill¬ 
ing Carter. Carter’s 4-year-old 
daughter was in the dwelling 
when the shooting occurred, 
according to Lt. Kenneth Kraus, 
of the Romulus Detective 
Bureau. 

“We believe that this was a 
case of boyfriend-girlfriend 


trouble that culminated in this 
tragedy,” Kraus said. “We 
have concluded that it was a 
murder-suicide, however, hour 
investigation won’t be complete 
until we get a lab report.” 

Police said that shortly after 
10:30 a.m. last Thursday, San¬ 
dusky went the Carter’s house 
and was permitted entry by her 
into the dwelling. 

According to police reports 
Fuller and Carter’s 4-year-old 
daughter also were in the 
house. 

“We don’t know what words 
were exchanged or what pre¬ 
cipitated the eventual shoot¬ 
ing, but we believe that Sandus¬ 
ky opened fire with a small 
caliber weapon, fatally strik¬ 
ing Carter and injuring Ful¬ 
ler,” Kraus said. 

Fuller managed to escape 
the house and came upon two 
men repairing a car. Before 
collapsing. Fuller managed to 
tell the men he had been shot 
before he collapsed. The men 
called police. 


Local woman killed 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


Veda Reed, 60, of Romulus 
was killed in a collision be¬ 
tween two automobiles on Mid- 
dlebelt Road early Friday 
morning. 

She was a passenger in a car 
driven by a relative, Mark Ber¬ 
ry, 30, of Knollwood Street. She 
had lived there also. Berry was 
seriously injured, according to 
Romulus police reports. 

The driver of the other car, 


Everell Price, 48, of New Bos¬ 
ton was not injured. The acci¬ 
dent is expected to go to Wayne 
County Prosecutors Office for 
further investigation. 

Detective Ken Kraus said, 
“Price was headed northbound 
on Middlebelt Road when Ber¬ 
ry pulled out of a driveway on 
the west side of the street and 
the two collided. 

Mrs. Reed was transported 
to Annapolis Hospital where 
she was pronounced dead on 
arrival at 10 a.m., less than one 
hour after the accident. 



Shane Paskowski of Romulus High School portrays “Alice” in 
the school play, “Alice in Wonder.” Performances are this Friday 
and Saturday night. Members of the infamous tea party are from 
left Michelle Leonard, Renee Brantley, Paskowski and Jennifer 
Woodall. ANP photo by Guy Warren/staff photographer 


Players perform and 
“Alice” is wonderful 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


The amount of talent at 
Romulus High School sur¬ 
prised even seasoned drama 
teacher Phil Walker. 

Walker heads the drama club 
in school and explains that not 
all kids are good at sports or 
academics. “Not everyone can 
be the top burger salesman. 
Kids today need these options 
to vent their creativity,” he 
said. 

The drama club is currently 
touring Romulus Elementary 
School with a production of 
“Golly Whoppers,” a collection 
of American tall tales. 

Other club members 
diligently rehearse for their up¬ 
coming version of “Alice in 
Wonder,” an adaption of Lewis 
Carroll’s famous book, “Alice 
in Wonderland,” The play in¬ 
cludes such favorites as 
Cheshire Cat, the Mad Hatter, 
the Queen of Hearts and the 
White Knight. 

“It’s real zany. The setting 
takes place in Alice’s mind. It’s 
a fantasy play and centers 
around her wonderment with 
reality,” said Walker who is 
credited with reviving the dra¬ 
ma club after a five year dis¬ 
appearance at Romulus High 
School. 

His long term plans include 
performing regularly before 
early elementary children in 
their own environment and 
when they get older to visit the 
high school for another per¬ 
formance. 

“We get their interest built 
up. It teaches young people to 
be g^ood socially. My role is dis¬ 
trict wide. To instill in the com- 


‘‘Let people 
remember they saw a 
great play and they saw 
it in Romulus." 

- Phil Walker 


munity an appreciation for per¬ 
forming arts. Let’s educate our 
students early,” he stressed. 

Walker feels young people 
learn good communication 
skills. “They express their 
thoughts, ideas and emotions to 
large masses of people. 
Whether they realize it or not, 
this type of learning can’t help 
but be an asset in their life, no 
matter what field they go into, ’ ’ 
he added. 

Walker can often be found af¬ 
ter school in a classroom filled 
with students. “They come af¬ 
ter school because they enjoy 
it,” he said. 

He and the 35 members of the 
drama club are hoping to turn a 
profit with their production of 
“Alice.” Drama members are 
so positive about their pre¬ 
sentation they will offer a spe¬ 
cial matinee for area youth 
organizations at 2 p.m. Satur¬ 
day, May 16. The publicity for 
the matinee went out to the 
neighboring communities of 
Belleville and Taylor. 

“Let people remember they 
saw a great play and they saw 
it in Romulus,” he said. 

Public performances at 
Romulus High School begin at 8 
p.m. on Friday and Saturday, 
May 15 and 16. For ticket in¬ 
formation call 941-2170. 




f^- 































































































'Pace 2 A BR 


Associated Newspapers, Inc, 


May 13, 1987 


Enhanced 911 plan ready to ‘ring’ 


I 


, Enhanced 911 emergency telephone 
"Service could be under way for the west¬ 
ern Wayne County area by early fall, 
according to Joseph Benyo, who is coordi¬ 
nating the project for the Conference of 
Western Wayne. 

^ At the May 8 CWW meeting, Benyo said 
lie has completed his Enhanced 911 pre¬ 
sentations to the townships and cities 
which will be affected by the implementa¬ 
tion of the service. 

Benyo reported to the conference mem- 
tiers that the tentative service plan has 
been completed and is ready to be submit¬ 
ted to the Michigan State Police and 
Michigan Bell Telephone Co, ^ 

' The project coordiriator hopes to briQg. 
jjie plan befote the Wayne County Board 
Jif Commissioners on June 4. Benyo said 
' that, following the approval of the county 
Commissioners,.a public hearing will be 
slated and the plan could have final 
approval in September. 

J, The Enhanced 911 emergency service 
i^ill feature a computer screen listing of 
jrhe callers’ addresses. In eniergency 
Situations where people are excited or do 
not speak English, the computer will pro- 
wide the police, ambulance or fire depart- 
(Snent with a name and address. Benyo 


noted in his presentations to area com¬ 
munities that in many instances people 
provide partial or incorrect addresses be¬ 
cause they are upset. He said the En¬ 
hanced 911 will eliminate this problem 
and also aid young children and non- 
English speaking adults to report 
emergencies. Because the address of the 
caller is recorded, he said, the program 
should aljso decrease false alarms and 
nuisari^^calls to the emergency line. 

In other action at the CWW meeting, 
subcommittees of th;e Solid Waste Task 
Force are-working on strategies to deal 
with thd anticipated future problems for 
member commmunities of the Confer¬ 
ence of Western Wayne. 

CWW Chairman Charles Griffin of 
Westland reported that the task force has 
divided into subcommittees to develop a 
“five-year plan update’’ to submit to the 
county and to develop alternatives for 
waste disposal. 

Griffin said the task force is studying 
the feasibility of forming incinerator au¬ 
thorities. Under consideration, he said, is 
the formation of separate authorities to 
serve the northern and southern CWW 
communities. 

Also under study by the CWW is a prop¬ 


osal to turn the operation of the district 
courts over to the state. 

Statistics on expenses and revenues re¬ 
ceived by the district courts are being stu¬ 
died by the CWW. Figures on the actual 
costs incurred by local police, fire and 
building departments to support the 
courts are now being obtained, according 
to Mike Archer of Dearborn. He predicted 
that “court costs will be a lot more than 
they (the courts) think.’’ 

In the past, he said, the court revenues 
and expenses were evaluated without 
counting the cost of other city or township 
services provided. With these additional 
figures, he said, the true cost of bringing 
someone to the district court can be deter¬ 
mined. 

Archer added that the survey results 
may be used by doctoral candidates to 
compile information for a book on the cost 
of the criminal justice system. 

Among those attending the meeting 
were Romulus Mayor Beverly McAnally, 
Inkster Mayor Betty Miller, Van Buren 
Township Supervisor Lynne Hamilton, 
Huron Township Supervisor Ralph Dugan 
and Marilyn Korotney representing 
Sumpter Township. 


County roatds stuidieid 


Simply put, the problem 
with county roads is that they 
are deteriorating at a faster 
pace than they can be re¬ 
paired. 

Traffic is on the increase, 
roads are busier than ever 
and, although extensive repair 
work is slated, there is county¬ 
wide discontent about the con¬ 
dition of major streets and 
roads, acknowledged James 
Vollman, director of the 
Wayne County Office of Public 
Service. 

Although there are more 
cars driving more miles, the 
increased gas mileage per 
vehicle has kept receipts from 
increasing, Vollman said. Gas 
taxes at 15 cents per gallon this 
year generate about the same 
amount of funds as the nine- 
cent-per-gallon tax did in 1980, 
he said. And, because there 
are more cars there are more 
demands on the roads. Infla¬ 


tion has also reduced the pur¬ 
chasing power of the available 
funds, he said. 

He noted that the county has 
more than 70 miles of two lanes 
roads which carry traffic of 
more than 10,000 cars a day. 
Other two lane roads are car¬ 
rying up to 25,000 cars a day, 
he said. Vollman brought a 
proposal to alleviate the road 
funding dilemma to the Con¬ 
ference of Western Wayne on 
May 8. 

The proposed Economic De¬ 
velopment Fund program 
would be funded out of in¬ 
creases in the state collected 
fuel tax and from Federal Dis¬ 
cretionary Funds. 

Vollman asked CWW mem¬ 
ber communities to bring the 
proposal back to their city or 
township and requested that 
those who support the plan, 
send a resolution to the state. 


THE UNDERDOG. 


Thursday: Seniors to host bake goods sale 


h 

“ WEDNESDAY, MAY 13 
-••OSTEOPOROSIS: THE BONE 
J-BIEF” will be the focus of a free women’s 
^ealth presentation from 10:30 to 11:30. 
"3.m. at Tonquish Greek Manor. 1160 S. 
Iheridan. Plymouth. The program, spon¬ 
sored by Catherine McAuley Health Cen¬ 
ter. will look at osteoporosis, a softening of 
bone most common in older women. 
*ree blood pressure screenings will also 
offered from 11.30 to 12:30. For more 
information, call 455-5869 
p. THURSDAY, MAY 14 

*^^The BELLEVILLE AREA SENIOR 
•CITIZENS CLUB will conduct the annual 
‘^ke goods sale May 14 and 15 at the Van 
guren Township Fire Hall on Fourth Street. 
The sale begins at 9 a.m. 

^ Members of the WAYNE HISTORICAL 
^SOCIETY will meet in the Rrst Congrega- 
^nal Church. 2 Towne Square. Wayne. A 
^rspective of Japan with a slide presenta- 
non will be the topic of the evening. Dr. C. 
Loring Brace, a professor of Anthropology 
at the University of Michigan, will address 
.jtie group. Public is invited to attend. Soci- 
I ety dues are also now due. 

FRIDAY, MAY 15 

The WESTSIDE SINGLES meet at the 
Livonia Elk’s. Plymouth Road, east of Merri- 
man. from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. For informa¬ 
tion. call the hotline. 562-3170. 
f SATURDAY, MAY 16 

A reunion of former members of the OP- 
J ERATION SLIM DOWN CLUB is planned 
1 at 1 p.m. at the Venus Restaurant. Ypsilan- 
I ti. Call Shirley Lawrence at 482-8753 or 
I Jean Lucas at 482-7367 for more informa- 
! tion. 

I SUNDAY. MAY 17 

* The WAYNE COUNTY COON HUN- 
i TER’S CLUB, 37816 Wick Road, Romu- 
J lus. west of Wayne Road, hosts a blueg- 
rass Jam Session from 4 to 8 p.m. every 
I Sunday. All bands are invited to play. 

I Dancing and refreshments will be 
I offered. For more information call 281- 
I 2511. 

J THE VAN BUREN POLICE Explorers 
meet from 7 to 9 p.m. every Sunday. Any 
person between the ages of 14 and 21 
interested in law enforcement as a career 
is invited to attend. For information, call 
699-7751 or 699-2714. 

MONDAY, MAY 18 

The RED CROSS BLOODMOBILE will 
be at the First Congregational Church of 
Wayne. 2 Towne Square. Wayne, from 3 to 
9 p.m. For an appointment, call Ann San- 


community 

colendor 


ture at 721-1448 or Mariam Shurlow at 721 - 
7619 

FREE HYPERTENSION SCREEN¬ 
INGS will be offered from 10 a m. to 3 p.m 
at the First Federal Bank of Michigan, 
41401 Ford Road. Canton. The event is 
sponsored by Catherine McAuley Health 
Center. Call 572-4000 for more informa¬ 
tion. 

A MENOPAUSE SUPPORT GROUP 

meets from 7 to 9 p.m. May 18 and June 8 
at Frost Junior High School, 14041 Stark 
Road. Livonia. Anyone interested in 
attending should call 531-8346 or 729- 
6465. 

A DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP meets 
on the third Monday of each month at Oak- 
wood Canton Health Center. 7300 Canton 
Center Road, Canton. For information call 
459-7030. 

A WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL drop-in 
program Is open to the public each Mon¬ 
day from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in Romulus Junior 
High School. Cost is 75 cents per night For 
information call 942-6852. 

TUESDAY, MAY 19 

The CANTON REPUBLICAN CLUB 
meets at 8 p.m. in the Canton Historical 
Building. 

The INTERNATIONAL CADET 
SQUADRON of the Civil Air Patrol meets 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays at 
Roosevelt Elementary School, 36075 Cur¬ 
rier. Wayne. Male and female students be¬ 
tween the ages of 13 and 18 who are in¬ 
terested in search and rescue, first aid. 
aerospace education and disaster relief 
are invited to attend a meeting. For further 
information, call 721-6847 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20 

The WESTLAND FAMILY SUPPORT 
GROUP FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE 

meets at 7 p.m. at the Westland Friendship 
Center. 1119 N. Newburgh Road. West- 
land. This new support group is for care¬ 
givers. family members and friends of peo¬ 
ple afflicted with Alzheimer's Disease. The 
group will meet on the third Wednesday of 


each month. For more information, call 
557-8277 

MOTHER-BABY EXERCISES are 

offered from 10 a m. to 12 p.m by Oak- 
wood Canton Health Center. 7300 Canton 
Center Road. Canton. For information call 
593-7694 

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY 

meets each Wednesday at the Belleville 
United Presbyterian Church. 11900 Belle¬ 
ville Road. Belleville. Weigh-in begins at 
6:15 p.m. with the meeting starting at 7:30. 
For more information, call 697-6852 before 
5 p.m. For more information call 274-7100 
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS meets at 
7:30 every Wednesday at St. John’s Epis¬ 
copal Church, 555 S. Wayne Road at 


Bayview. Westland For more information, 
call 722-6178. 

FREE BLOOD PRESSURE screening 
is available every third Wednesday of the 
month from 11 a m to 6 p.m. In the mam 
lobby of Annapolis Hospital. 33155 Anna¬ 
polis St. Wayne For information call 467- 
4570. 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Items for the com¬ 
munity calendar should be submitted in 
writing to: Community Calendar. The 
Associated Newspapers. P.O. Box 578. 
Wayne. Mich 48184 Deadline for 
Wednesday publication is noon Friday. 
Dated items will appear the Wednesday 
before they happen unless otherwise indi¬ 
cated on your request 


numone jcoeiy. 





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ROMULUS 

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ATTORNEY 

201 N. WAYNE RD., WESTLAND 48185 


Professional 

Directory 


Personal Injury • Real Estate 

Divorce • Bankruptcy 

Criminal Law • Labor Law 

Wills • Business Formation 

(313) 729-6500 


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201 N. WAYNE RD., WESTLAND 48185 


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Criminal Law • Labor Law 

Wills • Business Formation 

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COMMITTED TO 
QUALITY 























































































































Wednesday, May 13, 1987 


Associated Newspapers. Inc. 


Page 3 A R 


only in romulus 


Local businesses renew membership 

Several local businesses and individuals renewed their 
annual membership in the Romulus Chamber of Commerce. 
Those included are; Adventure Travel Service, Bob Brown 
Associates, Bobbish Industrial Products, Capac-Kasama, Linda 
Choate, Cudini Corp., Dadson Electric, Ecorse Electric, Euclid 
Machine Co., Everingham Clinic, Export-Import Service Co., 
Family Pharmacy, First Flight Service, Header Products, Herman 
Ludwig, Inc., John V. Carr and Sons, Kelsey Hayes, Kelsey 
Advertising Specialities, Landis Machine Shop, Jason Lovette, 
Morgan’s Collision, Morking and Sowards, National Bank of De¬ 
troit, Nelson Paper Recycling, Orchard Grove, Osborne Con¬ 
crete Co., Parkway Office Supply, Vincent Parratta, R.L. Coosaet 
Construction, Romulus Auto Supply, St. Lawrence, Inc., Saw 
and Speciality Corp., Bill Simonds, Stair Cargo Service, Springer 
Archery Supply, Super Y Market, University Office Equipment, 
World Travel and Wyandotte Savings Bank. 

Teacher wins IBM computer 

Marcia MacMahon, special education teacher, consultant for 
Barth School won an IBM computer for the school because 
she submitted a grant proposal to Project Access (Addressing 
computer Concerns of Educators of Special Students). Be¬ 
cause of the quality of her proposal, according to Barth prin¬ 
cipal Bill Smith, she was awarded the system complete with 
printer and monitor. 

state honors Barth School 

The State of Michigan presented Barth Elementary School 
in Romulus with a certificate of merit for the second consecu¬ 
tive year.The award reflects high achievement on the Michi¬ 
gan Educational Assessment Program by Barth fourth grad¬ 
ers, according to principal BiU Smith. He added that Barth 
was the only Romulus school to receive the honor for two 
consecutive years. 


Students display fine arts 

A French Horn Duet which included Crystal Thompson, left and 
Sandy Kushner performed before an attentive audience of pa¬ 
rents, teachers and friends during the Romulus High School Fine 
Arts Festival last week. ANP photo by Guy Warren/staff photographer 

Romulus Roman 

(USPS 470-400) 

Published Wednesday by Associated Newspapers, Inc., a Michigan Corporation. 35540 Michigan Ave. West, Box 578, 
Wayne. Ml 48184. 


2nd Class Postage Paid At Wayne. Ml. 

Home Delivery Rates 
SI .50 - 4 Delivery Month 
$1.75 - 5 Delivery Month 


Wayne County 

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Let's make a deal 

Resident offers city possible park land 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


A local resident recently 
offered the city of Romulus 22 
acres of undeveloped land 
which Mayor Beverly McAnal- 
ly considers a good site for a 
city recreation center. 

Irving Keene is the owner of 
a 22-acre parcel at the south¬ 
west corner of Wick and Shook 
roads adjacent to Elmer John¬ 
son Park. He told the mayor he 
would be interested in selling 
the property for park land or 
another municipal use. “We 
would be willing to enter into a 
sales agreement on terms 
which would be advantageous 
to the city,” he said. 

Keene said he would consider 
a trade of the land for other 
city-owned property. Accord¬ 
ing to Romulus Tax Assessor 
Matt Raftary, the land has a 
true cash value of $36,720 and is 
assessed on the tax rolls at 
$18,360. Keene added he would 
also be willing to sell on land 


tf the land isn’t suitable for a building or 
parkland, go no further. 

- Mary Ann Banks 


contract terms favorable to the 
city. 

“I don’t know if the land is 
suitable for a recreation center 
but I know kids always talk ab¬ 
out the need for a local recrea¬ 
tion center, .iust a place to go,” 
said McAnally. The site bor¬ 
ders two paved roads and is 
close to the junior high school 
she added. 

“If the land isn’t suitable for 
a building or parkland, go no 
further,” said Mayor Pro Tern 
Mary Ann Banks. “Parks are 
nice but they require mainte¬ 
nance. How many parks can 
acommunity support? If peo¬ 
ple are only using the area as a 
dumping ground, there is a bet¬ 
ter use. Elmer Johnson Park 
was a dump. Today, it’s been 
transformed into a very nice, 
lovely park. But it took lots of 
money,” she said. 




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48111. 


CITY OF ROMULUS 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING MAP CHANGE 

Notice is hereby given that the City of Romulus Planning Commis¬ 
sion will hold a Public Hearing at 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1,1987, at 
the City of Romulus City Hall, located at 11111 S. Wayne Road, Romu¬ 
lus, Michigan 48174. 

The purpose of the Public Hearing is to receive comments, either 
verbal or written, on a proposed amendment to the City Zoning Map to 
rezone from MT2, Industrial Transportation District 2, to C-2, General 
Business District, a 1.13 acre parcel of land located on the East side of 
Middlebelt Road between Hildebrandt Road and Airport Drive. The 
subject parcel is described more specifically as follows: 

The West 325 feet of the South 152 feet of the following described 
parcel: Beginning at the Northwest comer of Section 13, Town 3 
South, Range 9 East, Romulus Township, Wayne County, 
Michigan; thence South 00 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds East 
1994.63 feet along the West line of said Section and North 89 
degrees 48 minutes and 30 seconds East, 60.00 feet to a point on 
the East line of Middlebelt Road and the point of beginning; 
proceeding thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East 
1250.66 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 07 minutes West 
257.55 feet to a point; thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 30 
seconds West 1249.60 feet to a point on the East line of Middlebelt 
Road; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds West along 
the East line of Middlebelt Road 257.55 feet to the point of begin¬ 
ning containing 7.39 acres. Parcel Identification No. 050-99-0003- 
004. 

The following sketch illustrates the general location of the proposed 



All interested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given an 
opportunity to comment on said rezoning. Written comments may be 
submitted no later than 12:00 noon, Monday, June 1,1987, and addres¬ 
sed to the Building Department at the above address. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
City of Romulus 

Publish: May 13, 1987 


“The city would have the 
advantage in a trade,” said 
Councilman Ellis Pennington. 
“If you ever saw Elmer John¬ 
son Park before, when it was a 


dump, you’d know the city 
could go in there and do some¬ 
thing. I spent many vacation 
days with a bulldozer moving 
and covering garbage at that 
park. Now, Elmer Johnson 
one of the nicest parks in 
Wayne County,” he said. 

Members of the city council 
unanimously agreed to study 
the feasibility of acquiring the 
Keene property. 



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CITY OF ROMULUS 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING MAP CHANGE 

Notice is hereby given that the City of Romulus Planning Commis¬ 
sion will hold a Public Hearing at 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1,1987, at 
the City of Romulus City Hall, located at 11111 S. Wayne Road, Romu¬ 
lus, Michigan 48174. 

The purpose of the Hearing is to receive comments, either verbal or 
written, on a proposed amendment to the City Zoning Map to rezone 
from MT2, Industrial Transportation District 2, to C-3, Highway Ser¬ 
vice District, a 1.27 acre parcel located on the East Side of Middlebelt 
Road between Hildebrandt Road and Airport Drive. The subject parcel 
is described more specifically as follows: 

The West 325 feet of the North 105 feet of the following described 
parcel: Beginning at the Northwest comer of Section 13, Town 3 
South, Range 9 East, Romulus Township, Wayne County, 

■ Michigan; thence South 00 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds East 
1994.63 feet along the West line of said Section and North 89 
degrees 48 minutes and 30 seconds East, 60.00 feet to a point on 
the East line of Middlebelt Road and the point of beginning; 
proceeding thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East 
1250.66 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees 07 minutes West 
257.55 feet to a point; thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 30 
seconds West 1249.60 feet to a point on the East line of Middlebelt 
Road; thence North 00 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds West along 
the East line of Middlebelt Road 257.55 feet to the point of begin¬ 
ning containing 7.39 acres. Parcel Identification No. 050-99-0003- 
004. 

And, the West 325 feet of the South 65 feet of the following de¬ 
scribed parcel: Commencing at the Northwest comer of Section 
13, Town 3 South, Range 9 East, Romulus Township (now City of 
Romulus), Wayne County, Michigan; thence South Section 0 de¬ 
grees 03 minutes 40 seconds East 665.07 feet along the West line of 
said Section; thence North 89 degrees 41 minutes 20 seconds East 
1314.54 feet along the South line of “B and B Subdivision,” 
according to the plat thereof as recorded in liber 68, page 7 of 
Plats, Wayne County Records, to the Southeast comer of Lot 17 of 
said Subdivision; thence South 0 degrees 07 minutes West 820.70 
feet for a place of beginning; thence continuing South 0 degrees 
07 minutes West 511.62 feet; thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 
30 seconds West 1250.40 feet to a point 60.00 feet East of the West 
line of said Section and to the centerline of Middlebelt Road; 
thence North 0 degrees 03 minutes 40 seconds West 350.00 feet 
parallel to said West line and said centerline; thence North 89 
degrees 48 minutes 30 seconds East 561.81 feet; thence North 0 
degrees 07 minutes East 161.62 feet; thence North 89 degrees 48 
minutes 30 seconds East 689.68 feet to the place of beginning, 
being part of the Northwest one-quarter of said Section 13. Parcel 
Identification No. 050-99-0003-003. 

The following sketch illustrates the general location of the proposed 
rezoning: 


o 

s 


lU 

m 

ty 

o 

o 





WICK 


E. 


iilpeppanot 


GOOOARO 


---, p 

AU interested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given i 
opportunity to comment on said rezoning. Written comments may 1 
submitted no later than 12:00 noon, Monday, June 1, 1987, and addre 
sed to the Building Department at the above address. 

Linda R. Choate, Clei 
City of Romuli 

Publish: May 13, 1987 

































































































































Associated Newspapers, Inc. 


May 13, 1987 


Page 4-A R 


Graffiti artists paint bad city image 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


KJ 


The amateur artwork on dis¬ 
play on the rear walls of stores 
at the corner of Wick and 
Wayne roads and on the 1-94 
noise abatement wall in Romu¬ 
lus has received unfavorable 
reviews from several local re¬ 
sidents. 

“It’s getting bad,’’ said 
Councilman Barry Baumann 
who addressed the obscene lan¬ 


guage and artwork at the regu¬ 
lar meeting of the city council 
last Monday night after a resi¬ 
dent photographed the work of 
local graffiti artists. 

“The city is trying to build an 
image. Visitors drive through 
town, and that’s the first thing 
they see. I say we make the 
owners responsible,” he 
added. 

“It’s not fair to penalize the 
owners. You can make all the 
laws in the world. But if nobody 


enforces them, it doesn’t do 
any good,” said Councilman 
Junior Block. “Don’t penalize 
the owner, but the kids who do 
it.” 

Councilman William Wads¬ 
worth agreed, “Let’s not 
attack the local businessman. ” 

“Somebody must see these 
kids doing this. It appalls me, 
to use a familiar phrase, that 
our residents must realize that 
in order for the police to be 
effective in this community. 


they have to personally get in¬ 
volved. When they see this stuff 
happening, call the police,” 
suggested Councilman Pete 
Bergeron. 

“The grafitti is so unsightly. 
It’s a disgrace that these peo¬ 
ple have no pride in their com¬ 
munity. They don’t appreciate 
beauty. It’s not too hard to fi¬ 
gure out whose responsible. 
The culprit usually writes their 
name on the wall,” added 
Mayor Pro Tern Mary Ann 
Banks. 



Career planning 

;v Jerry Clark of Romulus talked to Air Force recruiter, M/Sgt. Jim 
3 Hoshield at the Western Campus of Wayne County Community 
■ College on Career Day.ANP photo by Joan Mary Dyer. 


Students honored 


Several students at Barth 
Elementary School in Romulus 
have been named to the honor 
roll for the current, marking 
period of the 1986-87 school year. 
Students whose names listed be¬ 
low appear in italics received all 
A’s during the marking period. 

MS. SZLUK’S ROOM: 
Richard Baldwsin, Diane Domas, Aman¬ 
da Ellis. Konrad Jager, Kimberly Randall, 
Angela Singleton, Amber Darnell. Dale 
Domas and Gary Harris. 

MRS. HUNTER’S ROOM 
Danny Bussard, Andrew Null, Clifford 
Steward. Tammi Ritter, Rachel Youtsey. 
Amie Jager and Nicklaus Locklear 
MRS. STREET’S ROOM: 
Monica Atherton, Dusty Brendtke, Laura 


Brown, Tonya Frye, Donna Fussell. Alicia 
Hackney, Amanda Harden. Kristi Hardrick, 
Shannon Harrison. Tabetha Jordan, Re¬ 
becca Klukowski. Tammy Koivisto. Heath¬ 
er Kuhrt, Jaime Luczak. Rogjett Peterson 
and Derek Welt 

MRS. GURSKY, MRS. HALL 
AND MRS. LANNING’S ROOMS: 

Yolanda Holliday. Rick Luczak. Talia 
Tripp. Christy Raupp, Robyn Grishaber. 
Terrance Hicks. Alicia Fitzhugh. Daniel 
Winston. Doreen Hein, Cathy Brown, Dawn 
Drysdale. Robb Thompson. Tim Null. 
Laura Chandler. Eric Lambert. Shannon 
Wiswell. Diane Kehn. Ryan Harris and 
Andy Burelle. All A’s; Jessica Henry, Susan 
Kreft. LaKesha Davis and Melissa 
Atherton 

MRS. HEDIN’S ROOM: 

Eddie Hubbard 


NOTICE 

ROMULUS CITY COUNCIL 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Romulus City Council has scheduled a Public Hearing to be held 
Monday, June 1, 1987 at 7:45 P<M., in the Romulus City HaU Council 
Chambers, 11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan 48174, to consider a 
request to rezone a .71 acre parcel located on Middlebelt, north of God¬ 
dard from C-2 (General Business) to C-3 (Highway Service) 



Goddard Road' 




Shaded area indicates 
proposed rezoning 


U 


All interested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given an 
opportunity to comment on said rezoning. Written comments may be 
submitted nolater 12:(X)noon, Monday, June 1,1987, and addressed to the 
City Clerks office at the above address. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
City of Romulus 

Publish: May 13, 1987 


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THE CITY OF ROMULUS 

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE ROMULUS CITY COUNCIL 
HELD APRIL 13,1987, IN THE ROMULUS CITY HALL COUNCIL CHAMBERS 


The meeting was called to order at 8:00 p.m. by Mary Ann Banks, 
Mayor Pro Tern 

Present: Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, Pennington, Wadsworth 
Excused: Baumann, Block 
Absent: None 

Administrative Officials in Attendance: 

Beverly McAnaUy, Mayor 
Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
John B. Lewkowicz, Treasurer 

Motion by Lambert, supported by Wadsworth, to accept the agenda as 
amended.* 

AGENDA 

Pledge of Allegiance 
Roll Call 

1 . Agenda 

2. Approval of Minutes 

3. Petitioner’s 

A. Thomas Wright (Bob Brown Associates, Inc.) - RE: Rezoning 
request PC-()03-02-87 

B. Oakwood Industrial Park Subdivision - Preliminary Plat Tenta¬ 
tive Approval 

4. Chairman’s Report - Mary Ann Banks, Mayor Pro Tern 

5. Mayor’s Report - Beverly McAnally, Mayor 

A. Energy Program 

B. Bid Award/Bid 87-9 Paving Program 

C. Enhanced 9-1-1 

D. Advertisement for Proposals for Performance of the Annual City 
Audit 

E. Planning Commission Appointments/Terms 

F. Mayor’s Exchange Day - F.Y.I 

G. Project Status - F.Y.I. 

6 A. Administrative Report - Linda R. Choate, Clerk 

1 . Transfer of Records 

2. Right-of-way agreement from Detroit Edison 

3. Update status on Urban Renewal Plat #1 Lots 232 and 233 

4. Second reading and final adoption of Budget Amendments C- 86 / 

87-49 and 50 

5. Request to hold Michigan Week Festival 

6 . Introduction of Chapter IV, Article 1.75 

6 B. Administrative Report - John B. Lewkowicz, Treasurer 
1 . Administrative Report 

7. Discussion 

8 . Unfinished Business 

9. New Business 

10. Communications 

11. Warrant #87-07 

12. Adjournment 

RoU Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 

87-134 

3A Motion by Bergeron, supported by Lambert, to schedule a pub¬ 
lic hearing on Monday, May 11,1987, at 7:45 p.m., in the Romu¬ 
lus City Hall Council Chambers, 11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, 
Michigan, for the purpose of discussing the request from Tho¬ 
mas Wright (Bob Brown Associates Inc.) to rezone five (5) par¬ 
cels of property (PC-003-02-87) located on the west side of Wayne 
Road, Romulus, Michigan, Between Ronald & Wick Roads 
from 0-1 (Office) to C -2 (General Business). 

RoU CaU Vote Showing; Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 
mously. 37.^35 

3B Motion by Pennington, supported by Lambert, to concur with 
the recommendation of the Planning Commission and grant 
Oakwood Industrial Park Subdivision, PreUminary Plat Tenta¬ 
tive Approval and to rename Maple Drive to Pine Drive. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

87-136 

5A Motion by Pennington, supported by Wadsworth, to concur 
with the recommendation of the Mayor and adopt the foUowing 
resolution: 

PERFORMANCE CONTRACTING 
WHEREAS: The City of Romulus has achieved significant 

energy savings as a result of successfuUy par¬ 
ticipating in the Community Energy Manage¬ 
ment (CEM) Program; and 

WHEREAS: The City of Romulus has implemented an 

energy program for efficiency improvements; 
and 

WHEREAS: The City of Romulu^’ objective is to reduce 

energy consumption by 20-25%; and 
WHEREAS: The Michigan Public Service Commission, 

Office of Energy Programs has offered to pro¬ 
vide direct technical assistance. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED: That the Romulus 
City CouncU does hereby endorse the parti¬ 
cipation of the City in EEF Program during 
1987-1988, and in the development of con¬ 
tinuing local energy planning and program- 
\ ming thereafter. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That the City CouncU hereby 
authorized the Mayor and Clerk to execute the 
agreements with the Michigan Public Service 
Commission, Office of Energy Programs 
necessary for participation. 


RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

87-137 

5B Motion by Pennington, supported by Wadsworth, to concur 
with the Mayor and award Bid#87-9 (1987 Paving Program) to 
the lowest qualified bidder Thompson-McCully Company, for 
the bid price of Three hundred eighty three thousand, four 
hundred ninety two doUars and seventy five cents ($383,492.75), 
plus a fixed interest rate of twelve (12%) percent, for paving the 
foUowing roads in Romulus: Herman Avenue, Herman Avenue 
& Crossman Avenue. Miriam Avenue, Romaine Avenue, Sterl¬ 
ing Avenue. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 87 .i 3 g 

5C Motion by Lambert supported by Wadsworth, to concur with 
the Mayor and grant authorization for a one time expenditure 
of One thousand, two hundred fifty dollars and no cents 
($1,250.00) as the'City of Romulus' share to participate in the 
hiring of the necessary coordinator for the Enhanced 9-1-1 prog¬ 
ram. Further Mayor McAnaUy, wiU return with a Budget 
Amendment. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 

87-139 

5D Motion by Bergeron, supported by Lambert, to concur with the 

recommendation of the Mayor and grant authorization to let for 
one, two and three year proposals for the Annual City Audit, 
beginning with the 86/87 fiscal year. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 
mously. 87 .J 40 

5E Motion by Wadsworth, supported by Lambert, in accordance 
with Chapter II, Article 1.3 and pursuant to P.A. 285 of 1931, to 
concur with the Mayor’s recommendation for the foUowing 
re-appointments and new appointments, to the Planning Com¬ 
mission, Donald Trader, Fred WiUiams, Sheldon Changler; 
term expires 1-31-90, PhiUp Renke, Sandy Honika, Stanley 
Kreft ; term expires 1-31-89, Dwayne Martin, Jack Barton, term 
expires 1-31-88, and EUis Pennington; term expires; 11-3-87, 
concurrent with that of City Council. 

RoU Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

5F NO ACTION TAKEN 

5G NO ACTION TAKEN 

Motion by Lambert, supported by Bergeron, to accept the Mayor’s 

report as presented. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, Penning¬ 
ton, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unanimously. 

87-141 

6A1 Motion by Bergeron, supported by Lambert, to concur with the 
recommendation of the City Clerk, Linda R. Choate, and grant 
authorization to transfer past records to the PoUce Department 
for storage. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 

6A2 Motion by Wadsworth, supported by Bergeron, to grant author¬ 
ization and approve the request from Detroit Edison for an 
overhead right-of-way agreement to cut a tree on City owned 
property for line clearance, as described: 

That part of the E. 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of Sec. 9 desc. as beg. at a 
point on the N. Une of said section distant S. 88.® 16’ W. 1108.22 ft., 
from the N1/4 cor. of Sec 9 and proceeding th S. 88® 16’ W. along 
said N. line 207.65 ft. S. 1® 57’ W. 230.21 ft. th N. 88® 24’ 50’’ E. 206.0 
ft. th. N. 1® 32. 20’’ W. 230.74 ft. to the POB. 1.10 acres. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

87-143 

6A3 Motion by Wadsworth, supported by Bergeron, City Treasurer 
John B. Lewkowicz, is hereby directed to close aU City accounts 
with National Bank of Detroit after May 13, 1987, if Certified 
Check No. 5966312, in the amount of One Thousand four hundred 
seventy seven dollars and fifty cents ($1,477.50) payable to the 
City of Romulus and drawn on the account of Paul Kennedy has 
not been honored by that date. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 

87-l« 

6A4 Motion by Bergeron, supported by Lambert, to adopt Budget 
Amendments C-86/87-49 and 50, introduced in the minutes of the 
regular meeting held April 6,1987, by resolution numbers 87-113 
and 87-108. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

87-145 

6A5 Motion by Bergeron, supported by Wadsworth, to concur with 
the request of the festival committee and authorize the Annual 
Michigan Week Festival parade to be held Friday, May 15,1987 
at 6:00 p.m. and to request the County to issue a permit to close 
Goddard Road from City HaU driveway through the intersec¬ 
tion of Wayne Road from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. or untU the 


streets are returned to normal traffic operation, exempting 
Wayne County from any and aU claims by the City of Romulus, 
and, to authorize the Clerk as the designated official to sign the 
permit. Further to authorize the 10-K Run to be held Saturday, 
May 16, 1987 at 9:00 a.m. 

Roll CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 
mously. 87-146 

6 A 6 Motion by Wadsworth, supported by Lambert, to remove Re¬ 
solution Number 87-127 Introduction of Chapter IV, Article 1.75 
from the table. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

6 A 6-1 Motion by Pennington, supported by Wadsworth, to concur 
with the recommendation of the Planning Commission and 
introduce Chapter IV. Article 1.75, an Ordinance to amend 
Chapter IV. Article 1 , the Zoning Ordinance of the City of 
Romulus by amending Sections 501,502,503,504,505, and 506, to 
provide for nonconforming Lots, Uses and Structures. 

RoU CaU Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 
mously. 87-148 

6 Motion by Bergeron, supported by Pennington, to adopt the 
foUowing resolution: 

VOTER’S REGISTRATION 

WHEREAS: A recent proposal by the Secretarj^ of State is 

urging that aU voter registration functions be 
transferred to the County Clerks of the State of 
Michigan and to the municipal Clerks of juris¬ 
dictions exceeding 100,000 in population to wit - 
Detroit, Livonia, Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, 
Flint, Lansing, SterUng Heights and Warren; 
and 

WHEREAS: The registration of voters has been and is the 

duty of trained local Clerks; and 

WHEREAS: Registrations from the Secretary of State’s 

Office have resulted in dupUcation of registra¬ 
tions as weU as being the source of many of the 
current inactive voters in our registration 
files; and 

WHEREAS : Such legislation would provide more opportun¬ 

ity for voter fraud since it is from “inactive” 
files that fraud is rnost easUy perpetrated ; and 

WHEREAS: Local Clerks are able to more readUy pick up 

on and correct incorrect addresses; and 

WHEREAS: Most local Clerks have access to computers in 

which they have entered their voter registra¬ 
tions and from which they print their precinct 
voter Usts, lists of voters requesting absentee 
baUots, senior citizens lists, etc. for their speci¬ 
fic jurisdiction; and 

WHEREAS: Most requests for such Usts come from the 

local voters and candidates in the local munici- 
paUty. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED: That the City of 
Romulus vigorously promote and support leg¬ 
islation to retain voter registration functions 
at the local level in aU Townships and Cities in 
the State of Michigan and urge their State 
Legislator and Senator to do Ukewise. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: That copies of this resolution 
forwarded to Senator WilUam Faust, Repre¬ 
sentative James Kosteva, Representative Max¬ 
ine Berman (Chairman of the House Elections 
Committee), Gener Thornton (MTA Director of 
Legislative Affairs), M.M.L., and Clerks of the 
surrounding communities. 

Roll Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron. Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 87-149 

6B1 Motion by Bergeron, supported by Pennington, to acknowledge 
and file the Treasurer’s Monthly report for March, 1987 as 
presented. 

Roll Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 

87-150 

11 Motion by Lambert, supported by Wadsworth, to pay Warrant 
#87-7 in the grand total amount of Five hundred fourteen 
thousand, seven hundred sixty eight dollars and seven cents 
($514,768.07). 

Roll Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani¬ 
mously. 

12 Motion by Wadsworth, supported by Lambert, to adjourn the 

regular meeting of the Romulus City Council held April 13, 1987. 
Roll Call Vote Showing: Ayes - Banks, Bergeron, Lambert, 
Pennington, Wadsworth. Nayes - None. Motion Carried Unani- 
J^o'^sly. Respectfully submitted, 

Linda R. Choate^ 
Clerk, City of Romulus 

I, Linda R, Choate, Clerk for the City of Romulus do hereby certify the 

foregoing to be a true copy of the minutes of tlie regular meeting of the 

Romulus City Cuoncil held April 13, 1987. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 

Publish: May 13, 1987 City of Romulus 


/) 





































• letters 

• columns 


opinions 


; may 13, 1987 


i Prompt dam repair essential 


During the past several weeks we have re- 
: ported on the suspected unsafe condition of the 
j French Landing Dam on Belleville Lake. Now, 

• those suspicions have been officially confirmed 
' by an underwater inspection and a subsequent 
; report by an engineering firm. 

• The worst fears of the lakefront dwellers, 
; sportsmen and waterfront businesses have been 

• confirmed - the lake level will not be raised to its 
I usual summer status. In addition, based on an 
; order from the Federal Energy Regulatory 
; Commission, the lake level is slated to be lo- 

• wered by an additional six to eight feet. Bellevil- 
^ le Lake will not be restored to the level needed 
! for maximum usage as a recreational facility 
I until extensive repairs have made the dam safe. 

In an April 22 editorial we supported the “safe- 
I ty firsC’ responsibility of Van Buren Township 
officials in making the difficult and highly- 
; unpopular decision to keep the lake at its winter 
; level. Based on the information reported by the 
J engineering firm, the Van Buren Township 
J board made the only possible decision - to pro¬ 
tect the lives and property of those downstream 
by lowering the level of the lake. 

1 We wish to applaud the board and Supervisor 
Lynne Hamilton on their handling of this diffi- 
: cult and controversial decision. First, Hamilton 
; appointed two respected community leaders, 

• Ronald Hink and Robert O'Keefe, to serve on an 

• ad hoc Lake Level Committee with him. The 
I three men, with three diverse perspectives. 


worked diligently to research the problem and 
presented an in-depth assesment of the situation 
to the total board. To its credit, the township 
board did not waver under the pressure of some 
individuals who have threatened “to remember 
you at election time.” Also to their credit, the 
majority of the township residents have 
accepted the findings of the engineering study 
and the subsequent decision by the township 
board to place safety first. 

We wish to applaud the efforts of Rep. James 
Kosteva for placing the $600,000 request for dam 
repairs in the appropriation supllemental bill 
and working for its approval by the House of i 
Representatives. The grant request, approved 
last week, can provide approximately 60 percent 
of the projected total cost to repair the dam. 

It now remains for the Michigan Senate to 
approve a similar bill for approval of the funds. 
We would encourage Sen. William Faust, Sen. 
John Engler and the remainder of the senate to 
approve this bill when it comes before them in 
the next few weeks. In addition to correcting the 
obvious danger to the downstream residents, the 
restoring of the French Landing Dam and the 
full utilization of Belleville Lake is important not 
only to the residents of Van Buren Township and 
the city of Belleville but to fishermen, water 
skiiers, boaters and other sportsmen from all 
over southeastern Michigan who share in the use 
of the recreational facilities of Belleville Lake - 
the only major lake in Wayne County. 


Opposites will attract 


As a public service, I am 
going to explain what the 
phrase “the opposite sex” real¬ 
ly means. This is particularly 
timely in light of the fast 
approach of June, the month 
usually renown for weddings. 
There may be many an un¬ 
knowing innocent about to re¬ 
peat nuptial vows without 
being cognizant of the full 
meaning of this euphemism. 

The full explanation is sim¬ 
ple. It means that no matter 
what you might do, your chosen 
life mate will do the opposite. 
Simple, huh? Now, I do not 
offer this revelation lightly, but 
after years of painstaking re¬ 
search. That and gossip with 
my co-workers which everyone 
knows is the most reliable 
source of information transfer 
available today, computers in¬ 
cluded. 

As an example, I spent 
Mother’s Day attempting to 
control my frustration while 
my spouse adjusted the VCR. 
Evidentally, these contrap¬ 
tions have to be tuned in to each 
channel somehow, and it is a 
painstaking and nerve wrack¬ 
ing ordeal. Now, what I would 
have done is simply ignore the 
unfriendly device and just 
watch the television - but, no. 
My husband who, typically. 
I’m learning wants all things 
mechanical to function with the 
precision of a drill team, in¬ 
sisted on adjusting the thing- 
amajig. 

My son and I, who incidental¬ 
ly were attempting to watch a 
movie during my darling’s 
burst of technical frenzy, gave 
up after an hour or so. He fell 
asleep, and I fumed...quietly. 



sue wiDett 
speaking 


• Now, for the benefit of those 
newlyweds and those just ab¬ 
out to marry, you can always 
tell when your spouse is about 
to have one of these fits. It is 
always, I repeat, always, pre¬ 
ceded by the statement, “This 
will only take a minute, hon¬ 
ey.” Always. 

One of my favorite co¬ 
workers, Joan Dyer, explained 
to me that she recently made 
the mistake of leaving a note 
asking her husband to check 
the bathroom drain. I repeat, 
she asked only that he “check 
the bathroom drain.” 

Upon her arrival home after 
a long, long hard day, she found 
every towel she owned soaked 
through, grout smeared on 
nearly every tile in her bath¬ 
room and assorted drain pieces 
scattered like the bones of a 
victim down the hallway of her 
home. 

Joan and I agree that if 
someone asked us to “check” 
the bathroom drain, and we 
found it less than satisfactory, 
we’d either buy a bottle of drain 
cleaner and pour the junk down 
the drain or call a plumber. But 
that is not the way of the oppo¬ 
site sex. 

I watch, perhaps, at the 
most, maybe, an hour of televi¬ 
sion or so each week. Never 
more. I don’t particularly hate 
television, I just don’t have 
time for it. But when I want to 


watch, say, L.A. Law, 1 don’t 
want to spend the hour getting 
the stupid “Rabbit” contrap¬ 
tion on top of the television to 
work. But those words are 
almost inevitable—“Do you 
hear a humming? This will 
only take a minute.” No, I don’t 
hear a humming, it sounds fine 
to me, sounds good, no prob¬ 
lem. But I’m too late, the poor 
rabbit is being reprogrammed. 

If I want a picture hung, I 
take a nail, a hammer (or a 
shoe if I can’t find the hammer) 
and put the thing up. My be¬ 
loved gets a special hanging 
kit, a hook, a tempered nail, a 
yardstick, a roll of specially 
manufactured picture-hanging 
wire, and what looks like a slide 
rule and makes sure that ev¬ 
erything is perfect, that the 
nail is in the stud and that the 
picture is absolutely straight. 
If I hang it crookedly, I put a 
piece of tape on the back to hold 
it straight. Nail polish will 
work in a pinch. 

It goes on, be forewarned, in 
every home across the country. 
It is, to be somewhat indeli¬ 
cate, a fact of life. Men and 
women approach household re¬ 
pairs in an entirely different 
manner and with an attitude as 
dissimilar as mine and Oliver 
North’s. 

Of course, when that stupid 
red light is flashing on the dash¬ 
board of the car, or I can’t 
make the computer do what I 
tell it to do, I’m somewhat 
appreciative of the mechanical 
inclinations of my mate. Okay, 
maybe a little more than some¬ 
what. 

After all, I didn’t marry him 
ONLY for his looks. 


letters* • .letters* * .letters* * * 


Bsnd uniforms where was the Wayne- 

‘sought for all’ Westland board of education 

when Franklin Junior High was 
To the Editor: raising money for their band 


Associated Newspapers, Inc, 

Winner 1986 Michigan Press Association 
Serving Western Wayne County 

• WAYNE EAGLE • CANTON EAGLE 

• WESTLAND EAGLE • BELLEVILLE ENTERPRISE 

• INKSTER LEDGER STAR • ROMULUS ROMAN 






SUSAN WILLETT 
General Manager 


DAVID J. WILLETT 
Publisher 


RAY DAY 
Managing Editor 


JOAN HINES 
Sales Manager 


BYRON SPENCER 
Circulation Director 


ANGIE KOPER 
Classified Sales Manager 


CARMELEDIA CLARK 
Production Manager 


The Associated Newspapers. Inc are puoitshed at 35540 Michigan Avenue West. Wayne. Michigan 
48184 

Central oflice hours are Monday through Friday. 8 00 am lo 5 00 p m Phone 729-4000 Office hours in 
Belleville are Monday through Friday. 9 00 a m lo 5.00 p m Phone 697-9191 

Classified advertising calls al 729-3300 and circulation calls at 729-4000 during central office business 
hours 

The Associated Newspapers. iNc publishes Ihe Westland Eagle. Wayne Eagle. Canton Eagle. Belleville 
enierprise. Romulus Roman arid Inkster Ledger Slar 


uniforms? My daughter work¬ 
ed hard on a fund raiser for uni¬ 
forms, yet I saw no support 
from the board or anyone else! 
The band didn’t make enough 
for all the band members to get 
uniforms. I challenge the board 
to also support the junior high 
as well as the high school in the 
Wayne-Westland district. 

WANDA JOHNSON 
Wayne 

Please, sign 
those letters 

The Associated Newspapers 
welcomes your letters to the edi¬ 
tor on matter of general interest 
to readers in the areas served 
by this newspaper. 

Letters should be as brief as 
possible, address one concern 
and include a name, address, 
telephone number and signa¬ 
ture of the writer. Names wUl be 
witheld from publication only 
for extraordinary reasons. 

We reserve the right to edit 
letters for brevity and space. 
Letters to the Editor 
Associated Newspapers 
P.O. Box 578 
Wayne, Mich. 48184 


page 5-a 




flying sol 


dovid j* willeff, publisher 


Responsible health 


There are many things for which we might 
rightly attempt to hold others responsible- 
...but our personal health is not one of them. 

Physical as well as mental health must be 
an area of individual accountability and 
should never be put upon others. 

There was a time when limited access to 
medical knowledge and care may have 
placed a greater burden on our attending 
physician to “take care of us.” Visions of the 
country doctor being called to attend to our 
needs come to mind. 

I have little doubt that even in that day, the 
country doctors of America frequently told 
their patients, “You must take better care of 
yourself.” 

Sadly, too many of us feel that our health is 
something that we can abuse for long periods 
of time, yet set right if “it gets bad 
enough.” Too late we often discover that 
although we thought we knew where the line 
was, we realize that our judgment was flawed, 
our judgment was flawed. 

When we drive our automobile and exceed 
the legal and safe limit, we may get away 
with it for long periods of time. Yet we often 
seem surprised when the long arm of the law, 
reaches out and catches us “speeding”. 
The obit column is full of names of people who 
got caught speeding with their health. Let’s 
face it, we probably take better care of our 
cars and pets than of our own health. 

There was a time when our doctor could tell 
us that a medical problem was God’s will, or 
beyond our medical knowledge, and we would 
accept our fate. 

This is not to say that we can ignore divine 
will, or think that everything can be cured. 
Yet today, we have access to medical know 
how accumulated from the dawn of mankind. 
Within the grasp of most of us are state-of-the- 
art medical facilities, ultra modem emergen¬ 
cy rooms, medical doctors with all manner of 
specialities, osteopathic doctors, chiroprac¬ 
tors, and nutritionalists. 

Additionally, our public libraries and book¬ 
stores are filled with volumes detailing 
medical problems, cases and solutions. The 
information, professional assistance and 


facilities are with limited exception, avail¬ 
able if we are inclined to seek “wellness”! 

I 

Then why, we might wonder, aren’t peopjie 
well? For openers, it is because too few of ^s 
practice preventive medicine. Waiting unjil 
the symptoms are raging may be escapable 
when we have a head cold. It however can ^e 
painful, expensive, and even terminal wh^n 
dealing with the more serious illnesses. ' 
The other reason we are not perpetually 
well, rather than perpetually ill, is that we 
either fail or refuse to listen to our bodies own 
feedback. When our internal system either 
whispers or even screams to us that we have a 
problem, we turn deaf. 


The body’s nervous system is a warning 
network that sends signals to our brain coiVi- 
mand center in an attempt to limit or preveht 
damage. } 

When we fail to listen to what the body Js 
telling us, we sustain unnecessary damagfe, 
pain and suffering. They say that death |s 
nature’s way of telling us to slow down. Deaih 
is, in fact, the extreme price we pay for ^n 
inability or unwillingness to listen and hee^. 

“I didn’t think it was that serious,” ‘»I 
thought I had it under control,” “I was t(Jo 
busy to get help,” are but a few of the excuses 
heard regularly by doctors from their pa¬ 
tients. I 

4 

When we hammer a nail and miss, hittirjg 
our thumb, the body tends to suggest by wdy 
of the central nervous system, that it would l^e 
a good idea if we stopped hammering on oijir 
anatomy. « 

Now, as simplistic as that sounds, that ^s 

not at all dissimilar to what occurs when we 
sense pain, see unusual bleeding, swelling, 
discoloration, unusual growths, or all manner 
of other signs of ill health. ! 


I am not suggesting that we become medickl 
practitioners without licenses. What I advocate 
is that we choose an attitude that our norm^il 
state of existence will be physical and mental 
well being, not perpetual sickness. 

It is after all an attitude, a choice...and 
way of life. Here’s to your good health. 

See you next week. 


profiles in photography 





Step right up 




































Page 6-A BR 


Associated Newspapers. Inc. 


May 13. 1987 


Van Buren 
adds new 
social worker 


Van Buren teachers, principals and 
counselors attended the May 11 school 
board meeting to voice their support for 
the hiring of an additional social worker. 

The hiring was approved by the board, 
but their decision required a separate mo¬ 
tion to make an exception to the hiring 
policy deadline. 

Because of the current lack of person¬ 
nel to provide services and complete re¬ 
quired records, the district is out of com 
pliance with federal regulations and is in 
danger of losing funds under the guide¬ 
lines for special education, according to 
Superintendent Dr. Elvin Peets. 

Administrators were unsure of the 
steps which could be taken against the 
district for being out of compliance, but 
admitted that the loss of funds is a possi¬ 
bility. 

In her support of the hiring. Trustee 
Connie Brinkerhoff said the two social 
workers “have spread themselves too 
thin.” She said their work load was at 
crisis proportions with the many serious 
situations the two workers dealt with on a 
daily basis. 

Other teachers noted an increase in 
child abuse, attempted suicides, drug 
problems and other serious situations in 
their plea for the additional social 
worker. 

One counselor outlined a recent morn¬ 
ing when she met with a female student 
who had no place to live, counseled 
another who has a terminally ill parent, 
dealt with a substance abuse problem and 
another situation which she could not 
comment on - all before 8:15 a.m. These 
situations, the counselor said, are all 
problems which need extensive 
counseling. 

Another teacher commented, “We have 
students who are bleeding and we don’t 
even have a Band-Aid.” 


Letter aids in ‘friendly divorce’ 


EX-HUSBAND SAYS EX-WIFE OWES HIM 
MONEY 

INTERVIEW SYNOPSIS : 

Mr. D and his wife had a friendly di¬ 
vorce. He was really a good guy about the 
whole thing. The divorce orovided 
however, that the ex-Mrs. D pay monies to 
Mr. D. He didn’t hound her, and of course, 
she didn’t pay. He has finally had it and 
wants his money. The following letter was 
sent. 

Dear C: 

I am sorry that this letter has to be writ¬ 
ten as I would have hoped that your 
obligations, as clearly set forth in our 
judgement of divorce, would have been 
met by you. Despite the fact that we have 
had numerous conversations during 
which I indicated that I had no intention of 
forgiving this indebtedness, you 
apparently have not taken me seriously. 

Attached please find a schedule of pay¬ 
ments, interest and balance due since the 
inception of this transaction, March 21, 
1980. As is clear, the balance owed to me is 
$6,231.88 as of April 3, 1986. Interest will 
continue to run until this amount is paid in 
full. 

There is no question about your ability 
to pay this obligation, and by this letter I 
demand remittance in full. "The equity in 
the ex-marital home is more than adequ¬ 
ate to secure an equity loan from any 
financial institution. 

In the event that I do not hear from you 
within 10 days of this letter in writing, 



letter writer 




gitmy 


regarding your intentions, I will begin im¬ 
mediate action to foreclose on the lien re¬ 
corded against the house. I am not setting 
forth a threat as I would most prefer to 
resolve this matter amicably, however, I 
will avail myself of my remedies under 
the law. I have, from 1980 to the present, 
been extremely considerate in not 
aggressively collecting the amount due. I 
will not continue in this matter. 

Sincerely, Mr. D 

COMMENT: 

Both parties did some talking. As is 
often the case when a letter of this type is 
written - of such a personal nature - I 
often don’t get an exact resolution. This is 
a sensitive matter, and there are two 
sides to every story. The letter, neverthe¬ 
less, got some communication action, if 
not a full resolution. 

Your responses to my column are 
appreciated. Please continue to keep in 
touch with me at: 

42245 Ann Arbor Road, Suite 109LL, Ply¬ 
mouth, Mich. 48170, 455-8892. 

35540 W. Michigan Ave., Suite206, Wayne, 
Mich. 48184, 326-0060. 


KEIM SOLD MINE! THE HELPFUL PEOPLE! 


4 BEDROOM BRICK RANCH - Extra insulation. Brand new furnace, 

6 ft. privacy fence. Belleville schools. Affordaby priced at.. $38,000 

CHARMING - Clean 4-bedroom ranch, formal dining room, fami¬ 
ly room, enclosed porch, circular drive, attached 21 12 car garage 
$57,000. 

BELLEVILLE BRICK RANCH - Natural fireplace, 3 bedrooms , 

2 baths, form?! dining room, attached 2-car garage, kitchen with 
built-in appliances. Van Buren schools.$59,900 

I ★ 6k S^^tcUe TfeecU 

'A' 7{/e Oa/i Ok 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

PROPERTIES UNLIMITED, INC. 

Beiievilie 10675 Belleville Road 697-0099 


KEIM SOLD MINE! THE HELPFUL PEOPLE! 



CITY OF ROMULUS 

OFFER TO PURCHASE 


BID #87-23 


ITEM(S) POSTAGE MACHINE & SCALE 


Sealed proposals on the above item(s) will be received in the Office 
of the City Clerk, 11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan, until 2:00 
p.m.. May 20, 1987. At that time said proposals will be publicly 
opened and read. 

1. Proposals shall be submitted on forms furnished by the City, 
which may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Director, 
11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan, and shall be enclosed in 
an envelope endorsed with the Bid Number and Item. 

2. The right is reserved to reject any and all proposals and to waive 

technicalities. Proposal guarantee in the amount of five (5%) 
percent of the bid will be required. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
City of Romulus 

Publish: May 13, 1987 


Belleville hosts 
annual parade 

I’ 

Parade-watchers will be on hand June 
20 to view the annual Strawberry Festival 
Parade on Main Street. 

The parade will begin at 11:30 a.m. at 
Belleville High School, 555 West Col¬ 
umbia, and proceed on West Columbia to 
Main Street, turn on High Street and then 
circle back to the high school. Judges will 
review the parade at the corner of Main 
and Roy streets. 

Parade registrations are being taken 
through the end of May by parade coordi¬ 
nator Dick Estermyer at 461-6484. 

Women 
appointed 
by counsel 


Books OK’d 

Four new tex¬ 
tbooks for the home 
economics depart¬ 
ment were approved 
by the Van Buren 
Board of Education. 

The new books are 
a consumer educa¬ 
tion text at $15.30, a 
housing and interior 
design book at 
$14.25, a clothing and 
textile book at $15.90 
and a personal living 
text at $18.99 each. 


Seniors 

report 

In its report for 
March, the Septem¬ 
ber Days Senior 
Citizens noted nine 
new members and 
692 newsletters dis¬ 
tributed. 

Montly attend¬ 
ance totaled 1,269, 
according to the re¬ 
port. 



Barbara Rogalle 
Miller and Audrey 
Bennett were 
appointed as ambas¬ 
sadors of goodwill to 
the People’s Repub¬ 
lic of China on behalf 
of the city of Belle¬ 
ville. 

The Province of 
Sichuan has ex¬ 
pressed interest in 
establishing a 
Chinese cultural 
center in Belleville. 




CUSTOM & m 
READYMADE 
FRAMES 

• Art Classes, Supplies 

• For a small fee, use 
our paints and brushes 
"Try our famous painting 

in one evening class. " 

BENTLEY GALLERY 

9475 Morton Taylor Rood 

1 mi. • 1-94 Bellevlle ^ mi. - 1-275 


697-6441 



Jl 


A 



GETTING THIS WASN’T EASY. 



WITH FORD CREDIT 
GETTING THIS... 



FROM ATCHINSON FORD IS. 


At Alchinson Ford, we know 
getting that degree wasn't easy. But 
when it comes to a new car. we can 
help with pre-approved credit from 
Ford Credit. If you are working on an 
advarKed degree or graduating with 
a Bachelor’s Degree between 
October 1, 1986 and September 30. 
1987. you may qualify for this 
speaal college graduate purchase 
program 

If you do, you'll receive a $400 
cash allowance from Ford. Make 
your best deal on any qualifying 
vehi^ and use the money toward 
yCK.’f down payment, or Ford \mII 





send you a $400 check after the 
purchase or lease. The money is 
yours whether you finance or not. 

The arrxxjnt of your credit 
depends on which of these qualified 
vehicles you choose; 

Ford cars; Escort. Escort EXP, 
Tempo. Mustang. Thunderbird. 
Taurus. 

Ford trucks: Aeroslar. Bronco II. 
Ftanger. 

So hurry If a vehicle is not in 
dealer stock you must order by June 
1. 1987. and you must take delivery 
of any vehicle by August 31. 1987. 


MAKE IT EASy ON YOURSELF. GET ALL THE DETAILS TODAY AT 


YOUR BELLEVILLE FORD DEALER 


ATCHINSON FORD 

9800 Belleville Road, Belleville 


697-9161 


s I FORD 


Changes are being made in the way 
long distance users in your area place 
some operator-handled calls. 



Whofs ffiis about 
changes in how we get 
operator assistance on 
bng distance calls ? 







\ No big deal. 

j /1 Just ca11 your long distance ^ 
' / V company tor instructions...' 
' like it says in this ad. 





These changes affect Michigan Bell 
customers having phone numbers beginning with ^ 

397 . 


This is an informational message about your phone seirice finm Charlene 
Jones-Mitchell, your Michigan BelJ Corporate Affairs Manager. 

“These telephone senice changes concern only operator-handled long distance calls outside your 
Michigan Bell long distance calling area. They apply to collect, credit card, person-to-person calls, 
calls billed to a third number, and requests for assistance. Some customers will need to contact 
their long distance companies for new instructions on how to place such calls. To find out if and 
how the service changes may affect jmr ser\ice, we ask you to read the following e.\planation.’' 

An explanation of the chances in your operator-assistance service for calls outside your 
Michigan Bell long distance calling area (interlATA calls). 

How operator-assisted calls wereplaced before, if you wanted operator assistance to place a long distance call, you dialed 
“0,” or “0” plus the area code (if^required), and the phone number you wanted and an operator put the call through for you. 



How these calls are placed now. If the long distance ser\ice 
on the phone you are using is provided by a company that 
offers operator services and vou want operator ^sistancc 
to place a call , you dial “0,” plus the area code (if 
required), and the phone number and an operator will 
assist you. To reach the long distance operator for addi¬ 
tional assistance, you must dial “00.” (Important: If you 
dial “0” without the phone number, you will get a Michigan 
Bell operator who can place calls within your Michigan 
Bell area only.) 


If the long distance sendee on the phone you’re using is 
provided by a long distance compan y that does not ofier 
o perator sm'ices . you must contact that long distance 
company to get instructions on how' to place operator- 
assisted long distance calls. 

Please note: If you dial “0,” plus the area code, and 
the number, you may get a recording or no response. 
Further, if you dial “0” without the number, you will get 
a Michigan Bell operator w'ho will refer you to your 
long distance company for farther instructions. 


If you are calling from a pay phone, continue to use the instructions posted on the phone. 

Again, you should contact your long distance company for new instructions on how' to place operator-handled long 
distance calls outside your Michigan Bell calling area. If you have any other questions about the changes, please call 
Michigan Bell’s Let’s Talk Center. The toll-free number is 1 800 555-5000. 

Please watch your Michigan Bell bill inserts for farther information. 


© Michigan Bell 

A/\/ /iMKRtTECH COMPANY 


OI9HT .Michigan Bell. All Rights Resened 


Helping you communicate^ 


Interested in Business? 
See our Special Business Expo Tabloid 




b 















































































































associated newspapers 


business 


may 13, 1987 


page 7-a 


Open for business 


INKSTER RESIDENT LILLIE Ammons has been 
selected by Health Care Professional Ltd. as a founding mem¬ 
ber of the “Health Care Professionals Pacesetters.” HCP is a 
nursing service that provides staffing and private-duty ser¬ 
vices to health care facilities and home health care patients in 
southeastern Michigan. Ammons is a licensed practical 
nurse. 

THE90ELDERLY men and women of Canton Care Center 
are seeking the involvement and resources of the community 
to remain active, alert and informed. Officials at the center 
said that volunteers are being sought to help with center bingo 
games, serve refreshments, write cards and letters and visit 
with patients. For more information, call 663-3737. 

THE WAYNE COUNTY Cooperative Extension Service- 
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education program included 
an April 22 graduation ceremony for the 88 participants of the 
program. Completion of the 12-part course enables the gradu¬ 
ates to prepare low-cost, nutritious meals using limited re¬ 
sources. Anyone interested in the program should call 563- 
2950 for more information. 

THE SOUTHERN WAYNE County Chamber of Com¬ 
merce has welcomed the city of Romulus in membership. The 
chamber serves to promote economic and industrial growth 
in the downriver communities. 

INKSTER RESIDENT LEONARD Bankhead has joined 
McLean Hunter Cable TV. Also a graduate of the Spec Ho¬ 
ward School of Broadcast Arts, Inc., Bankhead is a camera 
operator for the cable company. 

A SPRING/SUMMER FASHION show will be pre¬ 
sented at? p.m. Thursday, May 14 at Chris' California Concept, 
8151 Lilley Road, Canton Township. Swimsuits, shorts and 
lingerie will be featured in the show. For information, call the 
health center at 459-1080. 

WESTLAND RESIDENTS ANNA Kwiatkowski and 

Viola Stanton were recently honored for their volunteer ser¬ 
vice by the Catherine McAuley Health Center. The two volun¬ 
teers were among 700 Center volunteers who donated a total of 
more than 43,000 hours of service during the past year in 110 
different service areas. 

THE ADISTRA CORPORATION of Plymouth has 
named Connie Breitenbeck of Plymouth and John Lucas of 
Westland as outstanding employees during the second 
quarter. 

ROMULUS RESIDENT TINA Smith recently joined G. 
Temple Associates, Ltd. of Southfield as a copywriter. Smith 
is a graduate of the University of Michigan-Dearbom and has 
worked as assistant editor of two trade publications. 

CANTON BUSINESSMAN AUSTIN “Woody ” Lynch 

was honored recently with a “Heart of the Industry” award at 
the Roller Skating Rink Operators Association annual con¬ 
vention. The award is conferred annually on individuals who 
have made outstanding contributions to the local roller rink 
association. 

AN OPEN HOUSE is planned from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, 
May 17 at the Plymouth Inn, 205 Haggerty Road, Plymouth. 
The inn is part of a three-facUity senior community develop¬ 
ment which includes a full-service apartment complex and a 
129-bed nursing home. Informal tours of the facility will be 
conducted. 


Compiled by Ray Day 



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Gamble turns to gain 

Canton carto n firm is stacking up the profits 


By SHERRY WOODARD 
ANP Staff Writer 


In December of 1986, entrepreneur 
John Schamante of Beverly Hills, Michi¬ 
gan took a giant gamble and moved his 
newly acquired folding carton company 
to a dilapidated, remote building in far 
southeast Canton Township. 

Today that company-Acme Packaging 
- is the only one in southeast Michigan 
that makes folded boxes and revenues 
have stacked up to about $2.8 million. 

Against the advice of a host of business 
associates, Schamante took over the for¬ 
mer Trilex facility located at the end of 
Yost street in an area characterized by 
railroad tracks and aging, heavy indust¬ 
rial facilities. 

“The first time I looked at (the Trilex 
building) I turned around and said, ‘No 
way,’ ” Schamante recalled. 

Necessity soon changed his mind. 

“We looked and looked and looked...we 
really could not afford the building that 
we needed,” he explained. 

So the 37-year-old businessman bought 
the facility and began a massive renova¬ 
tion project. The roof of the building was 
generously dotted with holes, the most 
prominent of which was a gaping space 
that looked like it could swallow a couple 
of large television sets. 


business 

profile 


The floor was equally plagued by holes 
and the rest of the warehouse style build¬ 
ing looked like the aftermath of several 
bomb explosions. 

Trilex had been an abrasive and mill 
company which had abandoned the site in 
1980. The building had been vacant ever 
since. 

“I remember when my little girl 
walked in here,” Schamante said. “She 
looked at it and said, ‘Daddy, this place is 
atrocious. Who would want to live here?” ‘ 

Schamante responded that no one 
would want to live there but, hopefully, he 
could restore the place to a state in which 
someone would want to work there. 

But money was tight. Acme, which had 
been in Dearborn, had recently merged 
with another packaging company. North- 
star of Grand Rapids. 


Eventually Schamante bought the 
Northstar share of the company. 

“I went to Canton and said, ‘We’d like to 
buy this building but we need some econo¬ 
mic help,’ ” the new president of Acme 
explained. 

Economic help from the township 
amounted to $2.5 million in industrial re¬ 
venue bonds issued through the Canton 
Economic Development Corporation. 
Acme has a decade to pay the money 
back. 

With the help of the loan, Schamante 
has been able to undertake almost $1 mil¬ 
lion in necessary rehabilitation work on 
the building. He has also been able to 
lease modern machinery used to cut and 
dye boxes. 

The company is still not quite in the 
black, however. “Not yet. Hopefully this 
month,” the owner said. 

Asked if he ever thought the road from 
company employee to company owner 
would be such a rocky one, Schamante 
replied that hardly anything has sur¬ 
prised him except for the “people prob¬ 
lems.” 

It has been a challenge finding depend¬ 
able, loyal employees, he said. 


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be available. 

Thank You, 

Herman’s Management 


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oil around town 


TWO STUDENTS AT Huron Valley Lutheran, West- 
land, participated in state Sen. William Faust’s leaders in gov¬ 
ernment program recent. The students, Robin Tafelski and 
Robert Young spent a day at the capitol as a guest of the 
senator. 

THREE HURON HIGH School, New Boston, students 
competed in a driver excellence contest recently, sponsored 
by the Veterans and Chrysler Corporation. Huron students 
participating included Tom Valentic, Karl Prath and David 
Yeager. 

GENA GILLENTINE, DAUGHTER of Kenneth and 

Carol Gillentine of Westland was recently initiated into mem¬ 
bership at the Michigan State University Phi Gamma Chap¬ 
ter of Delta Delta Delta Sorority. Gillentine is a sophomore at 
Michigan State University. 

TWO LOCAL RESIDENTS are participating in the Blue 
Lake International Exchange Program. Danielle Edwards and 
Trade Palmer, both of Inkster, are in the progratn, in which 
musicians from various countries exchange musical talents 
and ideas. 

WESTLAND RESIDENT DENNIS Picard is one of 48 

members of the Ferris State College Choir that helped con¬ 
duct the annual spring tour earlier this month. The tour stop¬ 
ped at six Michigan high schools and one area church. 

WAYNE STUDENT JEANNINE Zerona received the 
James H. PoweU award in Statistics at Western Michigan 
University this month. The award is presented to a senior 
majoring in statistics in recognition of high academic 
achievement in statistics. 

THREE LOCAL STUDENTS have graduated from 
Suomi College in Hancock, Mich. Iona Steele of Romulus and 
Joseph Collins and Charles Wright of Belleville received associ¬ 
ate’s degrees during recent commencement exercises. 

ROMULUS RESIDENT CHRISTOPHER Pennington, 

a junior at Messiah College, performed with the Messiah 
College Wind Ensemble during the 1986-87 academic year. 

TWO BELLEVILLE RESIDENTS recenUy attended 
the first reunion of the 135th NCB “Seabees” in Mobile, Ala. 
Mr. and Mrs. Christian Fischer attended the gathering, the first 
meeting since the group was discharged in December, 1945. 
The 135th NCB was responsible for building the air strip at 
North Field on Tinian, "rhe Enola Gay took off from that air 
strip on her historic flight. 

THREE LOCAL STUDENTS have been inducted into 
the Sigma Iota Epsilon scholastic business administration 
and management honorary society on May 2. Tania Marie 
Bailey and Gerri Nicosia of Westland and Noreen Hamlin of 
Wayne were inducted into the prestigious organization. 

ROMULUS RESIDENT FELICIA Nelson received a 
certificate for academic excellence at the recent awards re¬ 
ception of Texas Christian University’s Black Faculty/Staff 
Caucus. 

INKSTER RESIDENT STEPHANIE Kay Jackson has 

been named to the dean’s list for the first semester of the 
1986-87 school year at Indiana University. To be on the presti¬ 
gious list, students must maintain a 3.5 or higher grade point 
average. 

IN THE ARMED forces , several local residents have been 
making news. In Belleville, Aaron Redlaczyk entered the Air 
Force April 20, Ronald Poore has been promoted in the Air 
I Force to the rank of airman first class, Sandra Lanier has been 
f promoted in the Air Force to the rank of airman first class. 
Spec. 4 George Fenn has been deocrated with the Army 
Achievement Medal. 


Compiled by Ray Day 


PUTAN END1OY0UR 
DEADUrHABn: 





CITY OF ROMULUS 

OFFER TO PURCHASE 


BID #87-22 


ITEM(S) COMPUTER DESK 


Sealed proposals on the above item(s) will be received in the Office 
of the City Clerk, 11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan, until 
2:00 p.m.. May 21, 1987. At that time* said proposals will be 
publicly opened and read. 

1. Proposals shall be submitted on forms furnished by the City 
which may be obtained at the Office of the Purchasing Director,’ 
11111 Wayne Road, Romulus, Michigan, and shall be enclosed in 
an envelope endorsed with the Bid Number and Item. 

2. The right is reserved to reject any and all proposals and to waive 
technicalities. Proposal guarantee in the amount of five (5%) 
percent of the bid will be required. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 

D Ki- u ,, City of Romulus 

Pubbsh; May 13, 1987 

May 20, 1987 


CITY OF ROMULUS 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINO 
ZONING ORDINANCE TEXT CHANGE 

Notice is hereby given that the City of Romulus Planning Commis¬ 
sion vyiU hold a Public Hearing at 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1,1987, at 
the City of Romulus City Hall, located at 11111 S. Wayne Road, Romu¬ 
lus, Michigan 48174. 

The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments, either verbal or 
wntten, on a proposed amendment to Article 11: RC (Regional Center 
District) provisions of the City Zoning Ordinance. Proposed changes to 
this portion of the Ordinance are summarized below. 

Item #1. Amend Section 11.03, Permitted Uses After Special Approv¬ 
al to include automobile related services and auto service centers 
subject to specific conditions. 

Item #2. Clarify Section 11.04, Required Conditions regarding the 
percentage of required front yard area that may be utilized for vehicu¬ 
lar parking. 

'All interested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given an 
opportunity to comment on said proposed Zoning Ordinance Text 
Change. Written comments may be submitted no later than 12:00 noon, 
Monday, June 1,1987, and addressed to the Building Department at the 
above address. 


Publish: May 13, 1987 


Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
City of Romulus 






May 13. 1987 

World-famous vocalist has local start 



By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


Barbara Morrison makes 
lots of money doing what she 
does best - singing. But that’s 
only a side effect after 15 
years of hard work in the 
business. 

Morrison is a world 
famous vocalist. She has been 
accompanied by several 
musical greats have on tours 
overseas where she says her 
group of followers is the 
strongest. But fame and 
notoriety haven’t escaped her 
back home, either. Tune into 
any jazz or rythym-and-blues 
radio station, and Morrison’s 
distinctive voice will soon 
find its way through the air 
waves. 

The Romulus resident, born 
and raised on Vinewood, cre¬ 
dits her success to her family 
who supported and helped her 
make career decisions. Ex¬ 
cept the first time. 

“I knew what I wanted to 
be. But my parents insisted 
that I go to college. So I got 
in my car and drove to Los 
Angeles,” she said. 

And the rest is music his¬ 
tory. 

Morrison has recorded 13 
singles and six albums. Her 
most famous tune, she said, 
is a song by James Moody, 
“There I go, there I go...” 

“Everybody remembers 
that song,” she said. 

ASSOCIATED NEWSPAP¬ 
ERS: Where in the world have 
you performed? 

MORRISON: Well, I just re¬ 
turned from Japan, Australia, 
the Phillipines and Spain. La¬ 
ter this month. I’m traveling 
to Mexico, Argentina and 
Venezuela on a South Amer¬ 
ican tour for Phillip Morris 
Tobacco Company. 

They’ve sponsored several 
of the tours I’ve been on. And 
how this happened is interest¬ 
ing. The president of Philip 
Morris heard a song of mine 
on a New Jersey radio sta¬ 
tion. He liked me. ‘How can 
we find that girl?’ he said. 

Since then I’ve been touring 
with Philip Morris. I was an 
uknown artist and very for¬ 
tunate. We were billed as 
“Ten Great Jazz Musicians 
and a Singer.” Every country 
we visited the response was 
great. We acted like ambas¬ 
sadors of performing arts. 
Language was no barrier. 
Everyone understands music. 
In fact, the Japanese are 
learning to speak Spanish, the 
“in-language.” 

ANP: Is fame a problem? 

MORRISON: Not at all. Like 
I said. I’m more famous in 


Europe than here. Not long 
ago, my cousin called to say 
she had heard a song of mine 
on WCHB, which is broadcast 
from here in Romulus. She 
said, ‘Now I know you’re im¬ 
portant.’ 

But Romulus is home. The 
landscape reminds me of up¬ 
state New York. I’d like to 
move back here. My sister 
Pam lives in the house where 
I grew up. People here treat 
you right. In fact. I’m so glad 
to be home, my next album 1 
hope will be titled, “New Be¬ 
ginnings,” because of my two 
new nieces. One was born 
while I toured Australia. 

ANP: Name some of your 
popular songs. Who have you 
sang with? 

MORRISON: Most of my 
music is jazz or blues. I do 
show tunes and recorded a 
gospel album. In 1984, a semi¬ 
big hit was “When Will You 
Be Mine”and “Stand By Me.” 
The first guy I’ve recorded 
with was Eddie Vinson. He 
was great. Johnny Otis called 
and asked me to cut a record 
with him. At first I didn’t go, 
then I did. His famous tune 


was “Willie and the Hand 
Jive.” And on that national 
television ad for Chevrolet 
Spectrum, that’s me singing. 

In November, I sang with 
the Jazz Crusaders at Michi¬ 
gan State University before 
one of my largest crowds, 
2,000 people. Otis Ology 
helped write five of my songs 
on my upcoming album. I 
sang with Ron Carter, one of 
the world’s most famous bass 
players. A good friend of 
mine is Betty Carter. And 
when I left California last 
time, Marla Gibbs, star of the 
television show 227, staged a 
big going-away party for me. 

B.B. King is a real good 
friend and so are Marily 
McCoo, Stevie Wonder and 
Dionne Warwick. 

ANP: What about your be¬ 
ginnings here in Romulus? 

MORRISON: Hey, I’m a 
graduate of Romulus High 
School. I’m the oldest of six 
children and 37 years old. I 
studied accounting at Eastern 
Michigan University before I 
moved to the West Coast. 
There I studied acting and 
music for the first time. I had 


never even been in a choir 
back home. 

My dad sang and played 
the piano. He was in group 
and I remember going to re¬ 
hearsal with him. I still recall 
songs from back then. My pa¬ 
rents were young and we kind 
of grew up together. We liked 
the same music. 

ANP: Why are you home in 
Romulus anyway? 

MORRISON: I’ve got a sing¬ 
ing engagement on Friday, 
May 15 at the Fabulous Latin 
Quarters, 3067 E. Grand 
Boulevard, Detroit. There 
will be two shows, one at 8 
p.m. and the other at 11 p.m. 
Tickets are $10 in advance 
and $12 at the door. You 
should come. 


Focus on people is a weekly 
series in the Associated 
Newspapers, designed to 
spotlight on individuals and 
groups in the areas served by 
this newspaper. If you know 
someone who would make an 
interesting spotlight, call our 
newsroom at 729-4000. 


CITY OF ROMULUS 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING MAP CHANGE 

Notice is hereby given that the City of Romulus Planning Commis¬ 
sion will hold a Public Hearing at 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1,1987, at 
the City of Romulus City HaU, located at 11111 S. Wayne Road, Romu¬ 
lus, Michigan 48174. 

The purpose of the Hearing is to receive comments, either verbal or 
written, on a proposed amendment to the City Zoning Map to rezone 
from C-2, General Business District, to M-1, Light Industrial District, a 
2.06 acre parcel located at the Northwest comer of Ecorse Road and 
Middlebelt Road. The subject site is described more specifically as 
follows: 

That part of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 2, Town 3 South, Range 9 
East, described as beginning at the Southeast comer of Section 2 
and proceeding thence South 89 degrees 46’ 08” West along the 
South section line 360 feet; thence North 0 degrees 44’00” East 360 
feet; thence North 89 degrees 44’27” East to the East Une of said 
section; thence due South along the East line of said section 360 
feet 60 feet thereof deeded for road purposes and excepting any 
easements of record. 

The following sketch illustrates the general location of the proposed 
rezoning: 


U_I I II II II 



AU mterested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given < 
opportunity to comment on said rezoning. Written comments may I 
submitted no later than 12:00 noon, Monday, June 1, 1987, and addres 
ed to the Building Department at the above address. 

Linda R. Choate, Clei 

. City of Romuli 

Pubbsh: May 13, 1987 


CITY OF ROMULUS 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
ZONING MAP CHANGE 


Notice is hereby given that the City of Romulus Planning Commis¬ 
sion will hold a Public Hearing at 8:00 P.M. on Monday, June 1,1987, at 
the City of Romulus City Hall, located at 11111 S. Wayne Road, Romu¬ 
lus, Michigan 48174. 

The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments, either verbal or 
written, on a proposed amendment to the City Zoning Map to rezone 
from RM, Multiple Family District, to RMH, Residential Mobile Home 
District, a 76 4- acre parcel of land located on the North side of Wick 
Road between Wayne Road and the C&O Railroad tracks. The subject 
parcel is described more specificaUy as follows: 

The west 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 of Section 8, Town 3 South, 
Range 9 East, except the West part thereof measuring 67.20 feet 
on the North line and 74.82 feet on the South line of said parcel 
consisting of 76+ acres. 

The following sketch illustrates the general location of the proposed 
mobile home park: 





WAYNE RD. 







All interested citizens are encouraged to attend and will be given an 
opportunity to comment on said rezoning. Written comments may be 
submitted no later than 12:00 noon, Monday, June 1,1987, and addres¬ 
sed to the Building Department at the above address. 

Linda R. Choate, Clerk 
City of Romulus 

Publish: May 13, 1987 


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chuKh 


1 may 13, 1987 


page 9-a 


church notes 


Women’s celebration 
planned in Wayne 

Julia Smith Muir, a speech pathologist 
and therapist, will be the guest speaker 
for the women of the New Hope Mission¬ 
ary Baptist Church Women’s Day 
Celebration at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 17. 

Theme for the day is “Christian 
Women Witnessing in a Crisis.” The 
church is located at 5403 S. Wayne Road, 
Wayne. 


Rummage sale 
is planned 

Members of St. Anthony Catholic 
Church will host the annual rummage 
sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 15 and 
from 9 a.m. to noon May 16 in the Father 
Folta Building, 373 W. Columbia Ave., 
Belleville. 


Parking lot 
sale is set 

The parking lot won’t be for sale, but 
all of the stuff on it will be when the 
members of the First United Methodist 
Church host the sale at the church, 417 
Charles St., Belleville. 

The sale will be staged from 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m. May 29 and from 9 a.m. to noon 
May 30. 


Tea will honor 
longtime teacher 

An open house tea in honor of Mary 
Hoff for her 13 years of dedicated ser¬ 
vice as director and teacher of the New 
Nursery School will be staged from 2 to 4 
p.m. Sunday, May 17 in the First 
Methodist Church in BellevUle. 

Current and former students and their 
families are invited to attend. The 
church is located on Charles Street. For 
more information, caU 699-4870 or 699- 
3748. 


Confirmation set 
for junior members 

Students at St. Michael Lutheran 
Church of Wayne will be confirmed in 
the 10:45 a.m. service on Sunday, May 
17. 

The junior confirmands will take com¬ 
munion for the first time on Sunday, 
May 24. 

The church is located at 3003 Hannan 
Road, at Glenwood. 


Church news 
is needed 

News and information about churches 
in the area can be sent for publication in 
the Associated Newspapers. Send mate¬ 
rials to: Church notes, Associated News¬ 
papers, P.O. Box 578, Wayne, Mich. 
48184. 

For advertising or other information, 
call our offices at 729-4000. 


SIGN OF THE TIMES 


Churches inspire creatively 


E verything from bingo 
to church services, 
from advertising to 
wedding announce¬ 
ments. Almost anything the in¬ 
quiring mind wishes to ponder 
is visible on the many and 
varied, changeable signs that 
dot the landscape and sit in 
front of the area churches. 

While, no doubt, 
many of the signs 
merely convey in¬ 
formation about 
the church, ser¬ 
vice times and 
other pertinent in¬ 
formation for the 
congregation, one 
sign stands out 
above the rest. 

“Our retire¬ 
ment benefits are 
out of this world,*' 
reads the sign out¬ 
side St. Clements 
Episcopal Church 
in Inkster. 

The meaning of the sign is ob¬ 
vious, all you have to do is use 
the gray matter the good Lord 
provided, according to Patri¬ 
cia Ferguson, parish 
secretary. 

“When you read our sign, if 
you think about it, the meaning 
is very clear," she said. 

According to the Rev. Roger 
Aumann, pastor of the Christ 
The Good Shepherd Lutheran 
Church in Canton, the sign used 
there is basically for adver¬ 
tising. 


“Our sign says ‘Christ The 
Good Shepherd Lutheran 
Church.’ We just took a mes¬ 
sage down that gave the times 
of our Lent Worship Services. 
We basically use the sign for 
advertising the services and 
classes," he said. 

St. Mary’s of Wayne also 
uses the changeable church 
sign for advertis¬ 
ing purposes, 
according to Ger¬ 
ry Falkiewicz, 
secretary and 
bookkeeper. 

“We have a sign 
telling when the 
church was estab- 
lished and 
another telling 
when our liturgy 
classes are," he 
said. 

The sign in front 
of the St. Simon 
and Jude Church, 
Westland carried an Easter 
holiday message throughout 
the month of April, but it was 
changed for the purpose of a 
fundraiser, according to the 
Rev. Andrew Nieckorz, church 
pastor. 

“Our sign said ‘Blessed Eas¬ 
ter to All,’ but that changed to 
CSA 1987 Drive Begins May 1," 
he said. 

The CSA stands for Catholic 
Services Abuse and is a fund 
raiser for abuse victims, 
according to Nieckorz. 


Memorial service honors heroes 


A memorial service is planned at the 
Calvary Baptist Church in Wayne to hon¬ 
or the servicem'en and women who gave 
their lives for their country. 

Set for 11 a.m. Sunday, May 24, the ser¬ 
vice will be tied into Memorial Day activi¬ 
ties and will pay tribute to the friends of 
relatives of congregation members who 
gave their lives so that the nation “might 
live.” 

Nine people will be remembered in the 
service, including: 

• Pvt. First Class Donald Honeycutt, 
paratrooper, killed May 12, 1968, Anke 
Province, Vietnam. Son of Mrs. Ara Hon¬ 
eycutt, brother of Gladys Sabo. 

• Dennis P. Day, H.M.N. 3, killed in 
action Feb. 2, 1968, Quang Tri Province, 
Vietnam. Cousin of Audrey Miller. 

• Col. Roy A. Knight Sr., U.S.A.F., mis¬ 
sing in action May 19,1967, shot down over 
Laos. Father of Roy Knight. 

• First Lt. Jack L. Knight, 124th Cal¬ 
vary, killed in action Feb. 2,1945, Burma. 


Uncle of Roy Knight. 

• Larry Melvin Comis, U.S. Army, kil¬ 
led March 4, 1970, Vietnam. Nephew of 
Jim Buckner. 

• Cpl. Ralph S. Gray, Company 609 TD, 
10th Armor, U.S. 3rd, killed March 12, 
1945. Brother of Issac Gray. 

• Sgt. Walter Levan Clark, U.S. Army, 
killed Oct. 29, 1967. Brother of Marie 
Clark. 

• Wilbert Dockter, radioman first class, 
missing in action, 1944, Battle of Truk Is¬ 
land. Uncle of Gordon Dockter. 

• Floyd Edward Johnson, U.S.N., USS 
Hancock, killed Jan. 21, 1944. Brother of 
Camilla Cagle. 

The service will be conducted by the 
Veterans of the church and will begin in 
the church auditorium and conclude on 
the church lawn. The church flag will fly 
at half-mast under the direction of the 
Color Guard. The tradition of taps and 
gun salute will close the Memorial Ser¬ 
vice. 


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Church Directory 


Faith Apostolic Temple 

31 CO Harrison, Inkster, Ml. Elder: Wayne T. Jackson, Pastor 

Come and witness the supernatural move of God in our Holy Ghost-filled services. 

FILLED SERVICES: Healing and Deliverance 
Sunday School 9:34 A.M., Morning Worship 11:30 A.M. 
For transportation phone 722-1350 

RADIO BROADCAST: WMUZ-FM SAT.8 P.M., SUN. 3 P.M. 


PEOPLES COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 A.M. 

WORSHIP 10:45 A M. & 6:00 P.M. 

REV. JOHN D. HEARN - PASTOR 

29745 ANNAPOLIS, WESTLAND 722-2566 


iSf CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIICNTIST 

.'i(3()I6 Mic higan ,\vc.. W . Wavnci 

Sunday Scmcc 11 A.M. Sund<i\ sc lvool ii .VNI. 

\V(‘d. Evening Tc\siimon\’ Mcx-iings 8 H.M. 

Rc‘ading Rcxim Flours ii , VM. ■ 3 P.M. Mon. Thurs. 

Sunday, May I7ih Lesson Sermon Subject 
“Mortals & Immortals” 


jit 


CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH OF WAYNE 

AKA 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF CANTON 
31650 Van Bom Road Phone 721-4355 

Sunday Senices ■ Worship 9:00. SS lO:OD 
Worship 11:00. Evening 6:00. Wed. 7:00 

SERMON BY - DR. WELDON SPRACKLEN 


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associated newspapers 


ployrime 


page 10-a 


may 13, 1987 


Local psychic looks to May horoscope for answers 


AIRES (March 21-April 19) You may 

be very confused or frustrated over a 
decision you have to make. You’ve 
got an ideal image in your mind, and 
. the choice which will take you in that 
direction is clear. If you let others 
influence you to do something else, 
you’ll always wish you had chosen for 
yourself. This can breed a lot of re¬ 
sentment for a long time. You’ll be 
able to explain yourself a lot better 
toward the end of May. Wait until 
then to make “The Announcement.” 
You could receive long-awaited-for 
news around that same time so hang 
in there. It’s worth the wait! 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Some¬ 
thing is resolved once and for all 
where a relationship is concerned. 
Make sure you’re both totally honest 
about your feelings in this. If you’re 
not getting along with a co-worker, sit 
back and let him tie the noose around 
his own neck and the problem will 
take care of itself. The others aren’t 
blind. They’re just watching for 
awhile. If you call out the alert, point¬ 
ing it all out, they’ll think you set 
someone up. Best to just keep quiet 
unless you’re asked. You’ll be offered 
an opportunity to share your ideas 
later in the month. If you do this with¬ 
out putting anyone else down, you can 
gain a lot of ground. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Something 
at work may finally get you thorough¬ 
ly ticked off. Be careful not to act im- 
^ pulsively. You could create some 
problems for yourself in “teaching 
them a lesson.” Your words must be 
carefully chosen with your eye on the 
consequences at all times. The people 
around you can be extremely helpful, 
both now and in the future. But they 
don’t ever want your wrath brought 
down on them so they are watching 
all of this very carefully. 

CANCER (June 22-July 22) You may 
discover a hidden fact or two. Make 
sure you don’t overreact. There may 
have been several good reasons you 
weren’t informed. Please see how 
opportunities are being brought to 
you through your frustrating cir¬ 
cumstances right now. It isn’t time 
for you to make any major decisions. 



Just wait until you see all your op¬ 
tions. There’s still patterns from the 
past, then open up to those who care 
about you and aren’t judging you. 
They will be honest. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You’ll have to 
make some real decisions about your 
security and emotional attachments. 
If you need more education or a re¬ 
fresher course, then do it and stop 
avoiding a solution. Something has 
got to be changed and you’ve got to be 
the one to activate those changes. 
Don’t focus on who is not around. 
Focus on the many people who are in 
your life now and tell them what you 
need. They can’t help unless you tell 
them. You may feel a strong sense of 
faith in your future even if you don’t 
know why. Trust it. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Be careful 
when making final statements that 
you can’t take back, especially 
around the full moon or on the 13th. 
But you’ll probably be offered some¬ 
thing that you’ll have to let go of in 
order to gain something else. It’s 
timely but just watch words that you 
say all around thi«w This can lead into 
a career opportunity that may have 
to do with communications. You’ll 
draw lots of ambitious people who 
have lots of encouragement for you. 
But action is what they do respect, 
and that could be your greatest asset 
right now. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.23)A close call 
turns into a positive after all. Rela¬ 
tionships take a strong independent 
turn while the romance intensifies. 
This interesting combination is very 
healthy for a working relationship. In 
a relationship that is not working, it 


helps clarify the problems. In any 
case, you’ll be freed from situations 
that are no-win frustrations. You 
could have an opportunity to be pub¬ 
lished or recognized for information 
you have to share in some way. Ro¬ 
mance just gets better toward the end 
of the month. Let yourself enjoy 
being pampered and spoiled a little 
bit, Libra. (Spoiling your sweetie will 
be a lot of fun, too!) 

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) You’re 
forced by circumstances to make 
changes that you would never have 
done otherwise. It may be hard to see 
right now, but there will be a 
tremendous help in there among the 
thorns. There’ll be some real good 
news toward the end of May, and it 
could be that last minute reprieve. 
You need lots of affection and warm 
hugs. (This is an emotional need, not 
a physical one.). Don’t be afriad to 
show your real self. It’s the most lov¬ 
able part. Your creative juices are 
really flowing, so come up with some 
solutions that no one else has thought 
of. Someone preaching at you will 
drive you bonkers if you allow it. 
Avoiding them will work,too. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) 

You’ve got a proposal or ideal to help 
the team effort. If it isn’t appreci¬ 
ated, take it to someone who is in¬ 
terested in your ideas, because 
there’s a real keeper somewhere in 
there. You could lose a friend be¬ 
cause of a difference over the choices 
in your love life. If you agree in your 
heart with the others, don’t let pride 
get in the way. It isn’t worth losing a 
friend over, unless you know they are 
being unfair. In any case, it’s time to 
have that long heart-to-heart and let 
all those deepest concerns come out 
so you can both see things much mroe 
clearly. Too much dependency wears 
you out. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Well, 
you’ve had your say and you laid your 
expectations on the table. Now, the 
rest is up to others. In any case, your 
words will stand and there’s no turn¬ 
ing back now. You’re just aching to 
make drastic changes but the time 
never seems right. But, you have 


already started those changes by 
what you have said to others whether 
you’ve realized it or not. You’re 
sometimes your own worst enemy. 
Rather than criticizing others, do it 
yourself in a better way. Or, be quiet. 
Being a critic is easy. Doing it better 
is a little tougher. Your partners and 
friends may be counting on you. 
Don’t let them down. There’s values 
in life that cost, price and wages have 
nothing to do with. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Some¬ 
one out in the world may try to cast 
doubt and suspicion on areas you 
should trust in completely. Be careful 
of those who would make you doubt. 
Sharing a painful situation from your 
past can help someone else with their 
problem. You’ll want to work out dif¬ 
ferences with co-workers before the 
end of the month if possible or power 
plays can result. Usually the one with 
the power wins, so if that’s not you. 
avoid the game altogether. Don’t 
ignore the idea of further education if 
you want to make real progress this 
year. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Someone 
is laying down some rules and it’s 
real this time. If you want others to 
understand you, you’ve got to explain 
yourself a little more. Self-image is 
very important. Communicate what 
you want, buy yourself a treati and 
say good things about yourself. Don’t 
allow any form of feeling sorry for 
yourself to bring your self-esteem 
down. Electric problems around the 
home can bring on sharp words so 
don’t let temper get away from you. 
Your desire for more freedom is 
affecting your good judgement so 
think things through very carefully. 
Too much freedom can leave you all 
by your little old self - remember no 
extreme is good. 


places to go 


Youth orchestra 
to stage concert 

The Dearborn Youth Symphony will 
perform their final concert of the season 
at 3 p.m. in the Dome Room of the Dear¬ 
born Civic Center, 15801 Michigan Ave. 
at Greenfield. 

Tickets, $3 for adults and $2 for stu¬ 
dents and seniors, are available at the 
door. Call 278-1390 for more information. 

Memorial Day 
fun planned 

The Lower Huron Metropark near Bel¬ 
leville has a scenic parkway, 18-hole golf 
course, nature trails, several large pic¬ 
nic areas and a swimming pool available 
for Memorial Day weekend. Park hours 
are 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

The Willow Metropark, between New 
Boston and Flat Rock, is also open for 
public recreational use. 

Arts and crafts 
market scheduled 

The Garden City Community Festival 
will feature arts and crafts and a flea 
market at Ford and Middlebelt roads 
June 5, 6 and 7. 

Strawberry time 
spurs celebration 

The Belleville Strawberry Festival will 
feature a parade June 20. The festival is 
planned June 19 to 21. 

Balloon festival 
is in the making 

Planning is already under way for the 
1987 Mayflower Hot Air Balloon Festival 
in Canton Township. 

Dates for the event have been set for 
July 3 to 5. 


Sumpter Country Fest plans rodeo 


A rodeo, chili 
cook-off and a soft- 
ball tournment are 
among the events 
scheduled at the 
Sumpter Country 
Fest on July 31, Aug. 
1 and 2. 

According to 


Sumpter Township 
Clerk Joan Oddy, the 
Flying W Rodeo has 
been the recipient of 

several awards. She 
noted there also will 
be a horseshoe pitch- 
ing contest and a 


Bingo players invited 

Bingo enthusiasts can participate in the 
games scheduled each Friday at 6 p.m. at 
the Sumpter Community Center, 23501 
Sumpter Road. 

The event is a fund-raiser which be¬ 
nefits public safety in the community. 


“beeper ball” game 
plus many other 
events. 


HAVE A 
TAnoo 

PARTY 

★ ★★ 

697*3840 

12 Noon to 9 pm 


WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT 
ESTATE PLANNING OR 
PRE-PLANNED FUNERAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

Listen to: 

A NEW RADIO SHOW: 
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Wednesdays at 1 p.m. 
on: 

iwoa iMjr 

fOdOAilt INFORMATIVE LISTENING 

With Tom Botwinski and 
Chris Ziomek 
Call 421-0707 With Your 
Questions On Future Planning 


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OPEN MON., THURS., FRI. 10-8, Tues., Wed., Sat. 10-6 
4405 JACKSON RD. ANN ARBOR 769-9815 


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ssociated Newspapers. Inc. 


Page 11-A 


Fertilization is the key to mak¬ 
ing the 250 acres of farm land 
a success at harvest time, Bel¬ 
leville farmer Don Dickerson 
said. At the left, Dickerson 
makes the fields ready for ferti¬ 
lization. High-tech equipment, 
such as the fertilizing device he 
is refilling at the left, is an in¬ 
tegral part of his current farm¬ 
ing life, even though Dickerson 
admits that is a vast change 
from the way things were when 
he started in “the business” in 
1938. Dickerson rents the 250 
acres of farm land, and he 
prays for a bountiful harvest 
each year. And although he 
often tires of the workload in¬ 
volved in the job, Dickerson 
said he has no plans of retire¬ 
ment for many years down the 
road. 


S mokestacks and high- 
rise office buildings 
may line the perimeter 
of his property, but on 
Don Dickerson’s 250 acres of Bel¬ 
leville land, the only products 
that will be manufactured will be 
those produced by Mother Na¬ 
ture. 

Born and raised in Belleville, 
Dickerson, 64, has been a part of 
the rural farm scene since 1938. 
And, he said, the vast experience 
he has garnered in farming has 
given him some insight into the 
plight of farmers who must till 
the land and farm the soil while 


last year. For, according to the 
veteran farm hand, participating 
in a career that has been around 
since the country was founded 
has a few drawbacks - financial¬ 
ly and physically. 

But that’s not to say that Dick¬ 
erson hasn’t let a little bit of 
high technology creep into his 
business. Why, Dickerson would 
be lost without his modern plow¬ 
ing equipment, he said, and har¬ 
vest season would be twice or 
even three times the chore if 
names like John Deere weren’t 
present on the farm. 


living in the high-technology 
world of the 1980s. 

Dickerson is sympathetic with 
such national farming focuses 
such as the Farm Aid events of 


photostoiy 


guy 

wQiren 


ROADSIDE 

RETAILERS 


Area farmers are 
making ‘house calls’ 


Calm dog’s fears 
with noise lesson 



Dear Mr. Morris: 

We have a problem with our 10-year-old 
'part-Shepherd Beagle. She is becoming 
very hyper when we have summer storms 
and firecrackers. Nothing seems to help. 
She trashed my closet, tearing shoe boxes 
to pieces, etc. 

Any suggestions? Would a deep box with 
: shredded paper, so she could ‘dig in’ help? 
The doctor does not approve of tranquiliz- 
^ ers unless absolutely necessary. 

‘ JANE C. WEN 

Wayne 

i Thanks to Mrs. W. of Wayne for the nice 
letter she wrote regarding this column. It’s 
gratifying to know we can be of help. 

Mrs. W. has a pup fearful of storms. This 
is a very common occurrence in dogs, and 
to pinpoint the cause one would have to 
have stayed with that dog’s litter to see the 
conditions under which it was nursed and 
! weaned and cared for from birth because, 

: many times, this is where the fear is 
? taught. The mother may have been afraid 
of storms and passed on this environmen- 
V tal trait to her pups. 

To eliminate the dog’s fear of storms, 
take some inflated balloons into the yard 
and go outside with the dog on a leash. 
While the dog is walking with you around 
the yard, inflate the balloons. Act noncha¬ 
lant and calm when walking near the bal¬ 
loons. The dog may sniff at the balloons or 
act suspicious or even ignore them. In any 
case, it is up to you to be relaxed and by 
doing so, convey this attitude to the dog. 

After a few trips around and through the 
balloons, when you have reached a dis¬ 
tance from any balloons, have another per- 
son begin popping them, one - then two at a 
. time. This is very important. You must 
remain calm, continue walking the dog 
even if the dog begins jolting away or acts 
■ frightened. After a few steps forward, sit 
the dog and give a lot of verbal and physic¬ 
al praise. The whole point is to instill in the 
dog’s mind the sound itself is not harmful 
and he must learn to trust your judgement. 

This exercise must be repeated every 
week - not on the same day or same time of 
; day - to build up the dog’s confidence in 
’ himself and in you and to create a toler- 
' ance to the noise. It won’t happen over- 
night. This fear is difficult to correct but it 
can certainly be done as long as you have 
the patience. 

After the dog has become “immune” to 
the balloons being popped outside, do the 
exercise in the baseipent or other large 
room inside the house. Follow the same 
procedure as outdoors. Ultimately, the dog 
will be able to tolerate 20-30 balloons (like 
= the sound of fireworks) being popped in the 
: same room he is in without any reaction. 


Got A Lawn, Plant Or 
Gardening Problem? 

Listen to: 

“GREEN PLANT WORLD” 

Wednesdays at 9 a.m. 

on: 

f090Aib INFORMATIVE LISTENING 

With Horticultural Experts 

Don Juchartz and 
Gayle Sarkesian 

Call 421-0707 With Your 
Horticultural Questions 


Got a Major Appliance Problem?? 
Listen to: 

'The Appliance Doctor” 

Thursdays and Fridays at 8 a.m. 
on: 

iwamBair 

1090Ait INFORMATIVE LISTENING 

Hosted By: 

(Dr.) Joe Gagnon & Nurse Eddie 
Call 427-0707 With Appliance 
Questions and Consumer 
Rip-Off Concerns 


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the hospital 
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call 

Health Crmnector. 



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When you depend upon 
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Health Connector is a 
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Simply call Health Connec¬ 
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For more information 
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May 13, 1987 F; 


Page 12-A 


Associated Newspapers, Inc. 


IMPORTANT NEWS 

FOR THOSE SUFFERING FROM 

• AUTO ACCIDENTS 

• WCRK INJURIES 

• PERSONAL INJURIES 

DON’T DELAT! 

CNIROPRACTIC NEALTN CARE 
IS VITAL TO TOUR RECOVERT 



INSURANCE PLANS PAY 

FOR CHIROPRACTIC CARE INCLUDING 

NO FAULT • BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD 
WORKER’S COMPENSATION and Many Others 


ON-THE-JOB INJURIES 


The most common occupational injury is 
sacroiliac strain. It occurs when the sacrum or 
tailbone slips from its normal position in rela¬ 
tionship to the bones of the pelvis. There is ex¬ 
tensive muscular and ligamentous strain. The 
pain is excruciating and movement of the legs 
is restricted. Often the sciatic nerve becomes 
involved which produces even greater 
disability. 

A person suffering from sacroiliac strain 
assumes a bent forward position. Any attempt 
to stand tall results in a shaq) and stinging 
pain. This type of strain is serious. If unatten¬ 
ded a sacroiliac strain can I6ad to chronic 
weakness of the region. 

Almost as common as sacroiliac strain is 
spinal strain, or what we often call a “wren¬ 
ch^ back”. This injury results from improper 
lifting, straining when pushing heavy objects 
and poor working posture. It can be felt 
anywhere along the spine. There may be an in¬ 
jury to one or more vertebrae. If the strain oc¬ 
curs in the upper back, shoulders and arms 
may become involved. There is muscular ten¬ 
sion and soreness. Any type of motion causes 
increased pain and all positions, whether sit¬ 
ting, standing or lying, may be uncomfortable. 

If you are a working man or woman, an oc¬ 
cupational injury could place a great fmancial, 
emotional, and physical burden on you and 
your family. It is your right as an employee to 
be protect^ as much as possible in such a case. 
It is for this reason that Worker’s Compensa¬ 
tion laws have been enacted in every state. 
Their intent is to assure the injured worker the 
best care available. 

Specific tems vary from state to state, but 
in general this means you are entitled to com¬ 
plete coverage of health care expenses incur¬ 
red due to an injury, and partial or complete 
compensation for loss of wages. 

If you are injured your most important con¬ 
sideration will be the type of care you choose, 
since this will probably determine how much 
pain and anxiety yoq will have to suffer, and 
for how long. 



important provision of Worker’s Compen¬ 
sation which is often overlooked is the right to 
select the doctor and type of treatment which 
best suits your condition. 

iSpinal and sacroiliac strain are only two of 
the disabling conditions a worker may suffer 
with as a result of an on the job injury. But 
since back injimies account for one-tenth of the 
total time loss injuries in industry, it is the area 
which deserves attention. And it is in this area 
in which chiropractic can achieve great suc¬ 
cess. Chiropractic attention will quicKjy reveal 
^e invplved vertebrae and corrective ad¬ 
justments will bring aboht a quick relief of the 
symptoms and a rapid correction of the 
disorder. 

If you or one of your loved ones are hurt on 
the job, consult our Chiropractic Life Center 
immediately. Modem scientific chiropractic 
proc^i^es reduce suffering, time loss and the 
possibility of permahent serious injury. . 



AUTO ACCIDENT 
VICTIMS 


That 

Sudden Stop , 



Broadside 
Impact Pi 



Rear-End 

Impact 


Neck and spinal 
injuries, as a result of 
automobile accidents, 
are among the fastest 
growing health pro¬ 
blems in the county 
today. The ever in¬ 
creasing number of 
automobiles on our 
crowded highways 
provide the ideal op¬ 
portunity for the ty^ 
of accident that results 
in sudden impact in¬ 
juries. 

Whiplash is the 
most fr^uent result of 
the sudden impact in¬ 
jury. The victim ex¬ 
periences severe 
headaches, shoulder 
pain, neuralgia of the 
neck and many other 
symptoms which are 
seemingly unrelated. 
When the head and 
neck are violently 
thrown forward and 
then backward, one or 
more vertebrae in the 
spine can slip out of 
normal position, in¬ 
terfering with the 
transmission of vital 
nerve energy. 

Another common 
injury occurs when a 
person is thrown from 
the seat to the floor of 
a car, or against the 
car door. The sudden 
impact will be to the 
lower spine and, if the 
shock is great, 


vertebrae in this area 
will become 
dislocated. The symp¬ 
toms of such an injury 
can include severe 
back pain, bladder 
disturbances, kidney 
disorders and 
menstrual distress 
among others. 

As a result of any 
sudden impact injury, 
there may be sharp im- 
pingement of the 
nerves and consequent 
ill effects upon the vic¬ 
tim’s general health. 

With modern 
scientific methods, we 
can quickly locate the 
vertebral injury. 
Then, with scientific 
and corrective spinal 
adjustments, we can 
re^im the vertebrae 
involved. Even a 
minor spinal injury 
can result in an 
unlimited variety of 
distressing and painful 
effects. Many disabl¬ 
ing conditions occur 
years after an 
automobile accident, 
but can be traced back 
to the sudden impact 
injury. 

Our Chiropractic 
office specializes in 
treating sudden im¬ 
pact injuries. See us 
immediately after any 
type of accidental in- 
jury. 




1214 S. 
WAYNE RD. 
WESTLAND 


CHIROPRACTIC LIFE CENTER 728-8100 


WE’RE EASY TO FIND! 


XJ 

GC 

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k. 

. 3 
XI 

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Cherry Hill 


O’DELL 


CLINIC 



xi 

QC 

Palmer 

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$ 

Michigan Ave. 








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Airport: a world 
in and of itself 

By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


Rush hour traffic almost never ends 
at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. 

And while southeast Michigan resi¬ 
dents affectionately refer to their air¬ 
port as Metro, few know little more ab¬ 
out this local international transporta¬ 
tion hub than the millions of travelers 
who annually pass through. 

Metro is the 10th largest airport in 
the United States, according to Mike 
Conway, airport spokesperson. The 
airport occupies 10 square miles on 
4,900 acres of land in the heart of the 
city of Romulus. The first square mile 
of property was purchased by Wayne 
County in 1929 and operations began 
the next year. 

Last year, county officials announced 
a major $143-million expansion of the 


facility which includes a new concourse, 
moving sidewalks and several other 
substantial additions and renovations, 
Conway said. 

Also last year. Republic Airlines 
merged with Northwest Airlines to 
form the third largest airline in the na¬ 
tion and selected Metro as an operation 
hub. 

Metro Airport has come of age. No 
longer is it a far away place in the mid¬ 
dle of nowhere utilized by only a few 
business men. As area residents in¬ 
crease mobility and airlines reduce 
fares, people of all ages and back¬ 
grounds are using the airport more and 
more. 

Delphine Fairbanks, airport man¬ 
agement coordinator, noted, “There’s 
even the world class Marriott Hotel 
with 166 rooms.” Marriott also oper¬ 
ates a lounge, dining room and 12 cock¬ 
tail lounges throughout the three air¬ 
port terminal buildings. 

“The airport employs 9,000 people,” 
stated John Garvin, airport tenant re¬ 
lation manager. “Only about 250 of 


those are county employees. Nineteen 
major airlines schedule flights from 
Metro. There are five commuter 
flights, and about 20 to 25 different 
businesses operate in the airport.” 

The airport serves as a major inter¬ 
national port of entry into the United 
States “with full customs and im¬ 
migration clearance.” It also handles a 
majority of local business cargo and 
logs more than 117,000 incoming and 
outgoing flights annually, according to 
county officials. 

Some businesses service the air 
traveler exclusively such as car ren¬ 
tals, or the parking lots on which ten 
thousand cars can be parked. Other 
businesses cater to more general needs 
like shoe shines, haircuts, magazines, 
food, drink and, of course, video 
machines. Several independent 
businesses boast a Metro Airport office 
address. Insurance and telegrams also 
are available. 

The airport maintains a first-class 
fire department of 35 full-time firemen 
working on three shifts. Security is pro¬ 


vided by the Wayne County Sheriff’s 
department, including mounted offic¬ 
ers who patrol the airport roads. Also 
on hand are two new “deputy dogs” 
used for the enforcement of federal 
drug laws, noted Wayne County Sheriff 
spokesperson Nancy Mouradian. 

More than one county official has re¬ 
ferred to the airport as a “city within a 
city,” and local city officials with a cer¬ 
tain amount of what could only be 
termed sibling rivalry describe the air¬ 
port as “autonomous.” 

And if the airport is a “city within a 
city,” then it is truly a city that never 
sleeps. People arrive and depart at all 
hours of the day and night. 

Airport officials note crime is not a 
“substantial problem.” However, in 
the same breath they note traffic prob¬ 
lems are increasing. 

Modem technology has transformed 
Metro Airport into a transportation cen¬ 
ter geared for the traveler of the 21st 
century. 













The business people at Metro Airport like Carol Wallace manager 
of the Candy Shop and Herb Kulzer, official airport barber, are 
happy to serve their traveling customers. Charles Kovach of 

Charlotte North Carolina enjoys the service with a smile, anp 

photos by Guy Warren/staff photographer 


Business: Service ‘a must’ 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 


“The competition is good,” said tenant 
relations manager John Garvin at Detroit 
Metropolitan Wayne County Airport. 
“Competition is so good!” he stressed. 

“But no new businesses will be added as 
part of the ongoing expansion,” he added. 
Twenty to 25 businesses currently operate 
on airport property. 

Herb Kulzer is the only barber at Metro 
Airport. For almost 15 years now, he’s 
fought the high pressure take-off dead¬ 
lines of his passenger customers. He oper¬ 
ates one of two on-site barbershops at the 
airport. 

He said business has been slow for the 
past 4-5 years but has picked up recently. 
“Airlines have scheduled flights closer 
together and people don’t have enough 
time between connecting flights. 

One of his customers, Charles Kovach 
of Charlotte, North Carolina said, “I occa¬ 
sionally get my haircut at the airport. 
With more and more delays between 
flights, I have the time.” 

“I used to get more traffic in here. The 


shop opened in 1958 with five full-time 
barbers. Plenty has changed since then,” 
Kulzer noted. 

Linda Battislone manicures men’s fing¬ 
ernails in the barber shop. “I’ve been 
very busy,” she added. 

The airport houses four general type 
stores which offer travelers magazines, 
souvenirs and other assorted sundry 
items. Two stores in the airport exclusive¬ 
ly sell candy. 

Manager Carol Wallace of Romulus at 
one of the candy stores, conceded “busi¬ 
ness could always be better.” She said the 
store sells no particular thing but “a lot of 
jelly beans.” 

The store operates the only Lotto 
machine in the airport and sells over 1,000 
per day. “That’s really good,” she said. 

The airport offers first aid facilities, 
two restaurants, toys, gifts, magazines, 
instant photos, video games, ice cream 
and a duty free shop. 

An observation deck where hard core 
plane watchers view landings and 
takeoffs is often filled to capacity. 

“Metro airport is the place to be,” joked 
Mike Conway airport spokesperson. 


Growth 

Area looking to 
airport expansion 

“The construction season is in full 
gear,” said Mike Conway, Detroit Metro¬ 
politan Wayne County Airport spokesper¬ 
son. And he’s not kidding. 

With $143-million worth of expansion in 
progress at the Airport located on ten 
square miles within the city of Romulus, 
the growing pains felt by the airport ex¬ 
tends way beyond its borders. 

“It is difficult to find any area in or 
around Metro that is not somehow being 
improved or expanded. About half a bil¬ 
lion dollars worth of long range improve¬ 
ments are being planned for Metro,” Con¬ 
way said. 

This first phase of development in¬ 
cludes 30 individual projects designed to 
accommodate the dramatic airline 
growth in the Detroit market, according 
to Conway. 

Selected projects include, a brand-new 
two-level concourse, moving side¬ 
walks, improved ticket and baggage 
handling areas, a new taxi way, an under¬ 
ground hydrant fuel system and construc¬ 
tion of a new Crash’Fire'Rescue building. 

In five years, enplanements, the num¬ 
ber of passengers arriving and departing, 
doubled from 4 million to 8 million, Con¬ 
way said. 1986 figures were up one million 
from the year before. 

“The number of passengers has really 
skyrocketed. Direct flights are up 41 per¬ 
cent. Much of this has to do with the mer¬ 
ger of Republic and Northwest airlines. 
Certain projects may change as needs 
change, ” he added. 

International traffic is expected to in¬ 
crease. Northwest Airlines now occupies 
a complete terminal after three other air¬ 
lines relocated in the other two airport 
terminals. The baggage handling area 
alone will triple in size, thus eliminating 
some existing baggage problems. 

“Metro Airport is an important link 
within the overall economy of the entire 
Metro area. Projections show that the 
potential exists for even greater growth,” 
he said. 


At this point, construction is going on 
around the clock. “It’s dramatic and ob¬ 
vious,” he added. 

One thing he stressed was that airport 
operations are financed completely from 
the airlines which use the facility and not 
“bv taxpayers.” 









































































































May 13, 1987 



eddings 


Sturtz — 
Wisniewski 


Deborah Sturtz of Belleville 
and Ted Wisniewski of Belle¬ 
ville were united in marriage 
at 4 p.m. March 7 in a double¬ 
ring ceremony at St. 

Anthony's Catholic Church, 
Belleville. About 150 people 
attended the service in which 
Father Raymond Skoney 
officiated. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Sturtz. 
The groom is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Thedore Wisniewski. 

The church was decorated 
with gardenias, freesia, gla- 
diola, mums and white pew 
bows. Music was provided by 
Kathy Briggs and Mary Pose- 
gay, who sang The Wedding 
Song. 

The bridal gown was long, 
satin and ivory, with a 6-foot 
train, high neckline, puffed 
sleeves of satin and net with 
appliques. Her bodice was net 
and satin with appliques of 
beads and sequins. Her skirt 
bottom was edged with lace 
scallops. Her veil was an ivory 
hat with netting. 

She carried a bouquet made 
of roses. 

Maid of honor for the occa¬ 
sion was Christi Wisniewski, 
sister of the groom and best 
friend of the bride. 
Bridesmaids included the 
bride’s cousins. Rose Laginess 
and Renee Chamerlain- 
Onsted, and the groom’s sis¬ 



Mr. and Mrs. Ted Wisniewski 


ter, Karen Wisniewski. 

Best man was Paul Wis¬ 
niewski, the groom’s brother. 
Ushers were the bride’s 
brothers, Greg and Michael 
Sturtz and Adam Wisniewski, 
the groom’s brother. 

A reception followed the 
wedding service at Thomas’ 
Crystal Gardens, Southgate. 
Afterward, the two traveled to 
Orlando, Fla., for their one- 
week honeymoon. 

They have made their new 
home on Willis Road, Belle¬ 
ville. 

The bride is a 1984 graduate 
of Belleville High School. She 
works at Hydra-matic, Ypsi- 
lanti. 

The groom is a 1980 gradu¬ 
ate of Belleville High School 
and has served in the Air 
Force. He is employed by 
Atchinson Ford, Belleville. 


new onivob 


Elyse is 
a first 


Elyse Aurora Allard was 
born the first child of Robert 
and Patricia Allard of Impe¬ 
rial Highway, Westland, at 
1:53 p.m. March 21 at Oak- 
wood Hospital in Dearborn. 

The infant made her debut 
weighing in at 5 pounds, 11 
ounces and measuring 19 in¬ 
ches. 

She is the new granddaugh¬ 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Swires of Westland, Mable 



Elyse Aurora Allard 


Allard of Westland and Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Allard of 
Wyandotte; and the new 
great-granddaughter of Mil¬ 
dred Swires of Fort Myers, 
Fla. 


Foxes have 
a new son 


Daryl Ryan Fox is the 
newest child of Daniel and 
Sandra Fox of Howe Road, 
Wayne, born at 10:52 p.m. 
March 25 at Garden City 
Osteopathic Hospital. 


The infant made his debut 
weighing in at 4 pounds, 8 1/2 


ounces and measuring 19 in¬ 
ches. 

He is the new brother of 
Jason, 7, Larry 4, Dustin, 3, 
and Jimmy, 3; and the new 
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Fox of Canton and Mr. 
and Mrs. Daniel Doss of 
Romulus; and the new great- 
grandson of Frances Patrick 
of Wayne, Vivian Fox of 
Wayne and Mr. and Mrs. 
James Mink of Kentucky. 


Andrew is 
number 2 


Andrew Christian Mielke 
was born the second child of 
Bruce and Jennifer Mielke of 
Century Court, Canton, at 6:22 
a.m. April 5 at Annapolis Hos¬ 
pital, Wayne. 

The infant made his debut 
weighing in at 8 oounds, 7 


Walker ~ 
Jennings 


Claire Ann Walker of Wayne 
and Todd James Jennings of 
Westland were united in mar¬ 
riage May 9 in a double-ring 
ceremony at the First Congre- - 
gational Church in Wayne. The 
Rev. Robert Millar officiated. 

The bride is the daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Walker. 
The groom is the son of Dr. 
and Mrs. James Jennings. 

Music for the service was 
provided by the church organ¬ 
ist. The church was decorated 
with peach and ivory roses. 

The bridal gown was a satin 
and ivory floor-length dress, 
with pearl accessories. She 
wore an ivory, Victorian-style 
hat, laced with tiny pearls and 



Mr. and Mrs. Todd Jennings 

a veil. Peach and ivory roses 
with babies’ breath were in 
her bouquet. 

Maid of honor for the occa¬ 
sion was Julie Saka, a friend 
of the bride. Bridesmaids 
were Carol Charboneau, Gail 
Reit2el, Dawn McCoy and 


The bride works as a type¬ 
setter with the Wayne County 
Intermediate School District. 
She is a 1983 graduate of 
Wayne Memorial High School. 

The groom attends Eastern 
Michigan University and 
works at American Airlines. 


project: 



ounces and measuring 21 1/2 
inches. 

He is the new brother of 
Matthew Adam; the new 
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. 
Christian Sucoe of Wayne and 
Mr. and Mrs. Don Mielke of 
Plymouth; and the new great- 
grandson of Lauretta Sucoe of 
Bedford and Edith Martini of 
Livonia. 


Korgals have 
a daughter 


Daschi Christine Korgal was 
born the first child of Steven 
and Kerry Korgal of Westland 
April 12 at St. Joseph Mercy 
Hospital, Ann Arbor. 

The infant made her debut 
weighing in at 9 pounds, 12 


ounces and measuring 23 in¬ 
ches. 

She is the new granddaugh¬ 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kor¬ 
gal of Belleville and Mr. and 
Mrs. Ron Zielinski of Ypsilant- 
i; and the new great- 
granddaughter of Frances 
Korgal of Belleville, Sophie — 
Rose of Belleville and Julie 
Adomitis of Ypsilanti. 


f 1 


Christina is 
number 2 


Christina Audrey Shandro 
was born the second child of 
Steve and Kathie Shandro of 
Church Street, Belleville, at 
6:36 p.m. March 12 at St. 
Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann 
Arbor. 

The infant made her debut 
weighing in at 8 pounds, 6 
ounces and measuring 20 1/2 
inches. 


She is the new sister of Jen¬ 
nifer Ann, 2; the new grand¬ 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Tanner of Franktown, Colo., 
and Mr. and Mrs. Dough 
Shandro of Calgary, Alberta, 
Canada; and the new great- 
greatdaughter of Florence 
Tanner of Weatridge, Colo., 
Mrs. Opal Wertin of St. 

Joseph, Mo., Jean Adams of v > 
Red Deer, Alberta, and Helen- 
Shandro of Ganges, British f 
Columbia, Canada. t. 


Daus have 
a new son 


David and Deanna Dau are 
the proud parents of a baby 
boy, Jonathon David, born 
March 23 at Beyer Memorial 
Hospital, Ypsilanti. 

The infant made his debut 


weighing in at 8 pounds, 12 
ounces. 

He is the new grandson of " 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Dau of Gar¬ 
den City and Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerald Bachman of Belleville; « 
and the new great-grandson oCr 
M r. and Mrs. David Esch of .m 
Belleville and Mr. and Mrs. .?i. 
James Bachman of Belleville^u'J 


Mark is 
number 1 


The infant made his debut 
weighing in at 7 pounds, 1 " _ 

ounce and measuring 20 inchesT; 


Mark Anthony Guyor is the 
new son of Debora Fullner and 
Mark Guyor of Belleville, bom 
at 4:29 a.m. April 28 at Oak- 
wood Hospital, Dearborn. 


He is the new grandson of 
Paul Fullner of Canton, Mr. ' 
and Mrs. Fred Wilson of Bell^' 
ville and Harry Guyor of Bel-‘^^ 
leville. 


Peggy Earle, also friends of 
the bride. Flowergirl was 
Janie Lynn Agemy, the bride’s 
niece. 

Best man was Gregory Gill. 
Ushers includes the groom’s 
brothers. Brad and Mark Jen¬ 
nings and friends Larry Cole 
and John Ericson. 

About 120 guests gathered 
after the ceremony at the wed¬ 
ding reception. The two 
traveled to Hawaii for 10 days 
for their honeymoon. They will 
make their new home on New¬ 
berry Street, Wayne, 


Send us 
your news 


The Associated Newspapers is pleased 
to announce news of your engagement, 
wedding, birth or anniversary. 

Forms are available in our main office in 
Wayne - 35540 Michigan Ave. - and in our 
Belleville branch office. 

Photos may also be submitted with your 
announcement. A $5 processing fee is 
charged for all photos submitted. There is 
no charge for publication of the announce¬ 
ment. 

Announcements are generally printed 
within two publication dates following sub¬ 
mission. For more information, call our 
newsroom at 729-4000. 


Help us find the recipient of WCAR’S “CITIZEN OF' 
THE YEAR" award. If you know of someone who has^ 
been helpful to others, send in their name and a briefV* 
explanation of their good deeds to; --r ^ 


“Citizen Of the Year” 

WCAR-RADIO 

CN-WCAR 


Livonia. MI 48151 


The .v-cipient will be awarded a (chauffeured) dinner foil'T., 
four at the beautiful RISTORANTE DI MODESTA and»K 
$100 00 in gift certificates to LAVDA’S JEWELERS',^ 
and WALTER’S HOME APPLIANCE. * 

Winner will be selected by WCAR and announced on June’’ * 
1. 1987 so hurry! ‘ 


WCAR TALK 

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il?»- 























































^associated newspapers 


may 13, 1987 


C elebration. Come 
on. They’re going 
to celebrate and 
party with you. For 
weddings, graduations, show¬ 
ers and birthdays. And you 
can be ready to let the good 
tastes roll by following a few 
simple rules and regulations 
of entertaining large groups 
of people. 

The foods chosen for a 
gathering, as well as how 
they are displayed, are essen¬ 
tial in creating an attractive 
and elegant atmosphere. An 
international buffet, for ex¬ 
ample, can give an instant 
theme and festive aura to any 
meal. 

Buffets - the newest and 
most often, easiest, way to en¬ 
tertain a crowd - are a great 
way to take the heat off the 
host or hostess during the 
spring and summer entertain¬ 
ing seasons. The sounds of 
wedding bells and graduation 
yells may fill the air, but the 
! real secret of making the buf¬ 
fet a success is in serving an 
; enticing, yet simple, meal 
that requires little advance 
• preparation. 

The traditional three-course 
meal is often too rigid when 
entertaining more than just a 
few people. With the in¬ 
creased interest in health 
I consciousness and varied 
'diets, formal meals can be 
.difficult to cater to every¬ 
one’s like and needs. Thus, 

_ the buffet offers the freedom 
to serve something that will 
satisfy everyone, whether it 
takes the form of an elabo¬ 
rate spread or a simple 
picnic. 

To make your party-serving 
‘'abilities easier, choose foods 
that are varied, easy to make 
and can set at room tempera¬ 
ture for an hour or so without 
spoiling the taste. However, 
c when serving the buffet, 

' make sure someone is 
' assigned to the task of keep- 
. ing a close watch on the supp¬ 
ly of foods. No one likes to 
I watch someone else eat some- 
« thing that is no longer in 
• supply at the buffet table. 

» Here’s a few time-tested re¬ 
cipes that are sure to make 
! the goods times roll at your 
; parties time and time again. 


• SPICY SHRIMP SPREAD 

: 1 8-ounce package cream 

; cheese, softened 
J 1/2 cup sour cream 
3/4 teaspoon cumin 

* 1 cup (4 ounces) 100- 

1 percent shredded monterey 

2 jack cheese with jalapeno 
2 peppers 

2 1 6-ounce bag frozen, 

! cooked tiny shrimp, thawed, 
2 drained 

1 1/2 cup chopped green 

2 olives 

2 1/4 cup pecans, chopped 

2 Combine cream cheese, 

2 sour cream and cumin, mix- 


TORTELLINI WITH CREAM 
SAUCE 

1 8-ounce package cream 
cheese, cubed 
3/4 cup milk 

1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated 
parmesan cheese 
Dash of ground nutmeg 
Dash of pepper 
1 7-ounce package dried 
tortellini, cooked, drained 
Combine cream cheese and 
milk; stir over low heat until 
smooth. Stir in parmesan 
cheese, nutmeg and pepper. 
Place hot tortellini on serving 
platter; top with cream 
cheese mixture. Sprinkle with 
additional nutmeg, if desired. 
Four to six servings. 


DOWN HOME BREAD 
PUDDING 

1 8-ounce package cream 
cheese, softened 

1/2 cup sugar 

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 

2 cups milk 

2 eggs, beaten 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

6 cups raisin cinnamon 
bread cubes 

Combine cream cheese, 
sugar and cinnamon, mixing 
well until blended. Add milk, 
eggs and vanilla; mix well. 
Combine with bread cubes; 
let stand 10 minutes. Spoon 
into greased 1-1/2-quart cas¬ 
serole. Bake at 325 degrees, 
50 minutes. Serve with 
cream, if desired. 

Eight servings. 


APPLE TEASERS 

Raisin cinnamon bread 
slices, cut into rounds 
Mild natural Cheddar 

cheese _ 

Thin apple slices 
For each appetizer, cover 
bread with cheese; top with 
apples. 


TEMPTING SKEWERS 

Red grapes 
Green grapes 
Pitted black olives 
Green olives 
Cherry tomatoes 
Kiwi fruit, peeled, cut into 
chunks 

Small whole onions, 
drained 
Melon balls 
Salami chunks 
Pineapple chunks 
Sharp natural Cheddar 
cheese, cut Into 3/4-inch 
cubes 

For each appetizer, place 
any ingredient, except cheese 
on frilled wooden pick. Insert 
pick into cheese cube. 


PORK AND PASTA STIR FRY 

1 tablespoon corn starch 
1 tablespoon white wine 


page 3-b 


1 egg white, beaten 

1/2 lb. lean pork, cut into 
thin strips 

6-ounces uncooked whole 
wheat spaghetti 

3 tablespoons oil 

1 garlic clove, minced 

1/4 teaspoon crushed red 
pepper 

4 cups firmly packed chop¬ 
ped spinach leaves 

1 red bell pepper, cut into 
1/4-inch slices 

3 green onions, sliced 

4 1/2-ounce jars sliced or 
whole mushrooms, drained 

3 tablespoons soy sauce 

In small bowl, combine 
corn starch, white wine and 
egg white. Add pork; stir to 
coat well. Cover; set aside. 

In large saucepan, cook 
spaghetti to desired doneness 
as directed on package. 

Drain. 

In wok or large skillet, heat 
oil. Stir-fry garlic and 
crushed red pepper in hot oil 
for one minute. Add pork; 
stir-fry for three minutes or 
until pork is no longer pink. 
Add spinach, red bell pepper 
and green onion; stir-fry for 
two minutes. Add spaghetti, 
mushrooms and soy sauce; 
stir-fry for 30 seconds or until 
hot. Four servings. 


FRUIT TART 


21 shortbread cookies, 
finely rolled, (about 1-1/2 cups 
crumbs) 

2 tablespoons sugar 

3 tablespoons margarine or 
butter blend, melted 

2 (3-3/8 ounce) packages 
vanilla instant pudding 
1-1/2 cups milk 
2 cups peach yogurt 
Assorted fresh, frozen or 
drained canned fruits (straw¬ 
berries, grapes, peaches, 
etc.) ^ 

In small bowl, combine 
shortbread cookie crumbs, 
sugar and margarine. Press 
onto bottom and l-inch up 
side of 9-inch springform pan. 

In medium bowl, prepare 
pudding according to package 
directions for pie, using milk - 
and peach yogurt; pour into 
prepared crust. Chill until 
firm, at least two hours. 

To serve, remove side of 
pan; arrange fruit on tart. 
Makes eight servings. 


FRESH COLADA PUNCH 


3/4 cup cream of coconut 
3/4 cup pineapple juice 
3/4 cup fresh lime juice 
3/4 cup cognac 
Pineapple wedges and 
whole strawberries for gar¬ 
nish 

Combine cream of coconut, 
pineapple juice, lime juice 
and cognac in pitcher. Pour 
into ice filled glasses and gar¬ 
nish with skewered pineapple 
and strawberries. 

Makes three cups. 


ing until well-blended. Add 
monterey jack cheese, 
shrimp and olives; mix well. 
Spread mixture evenly into 9- 
inch pie plater; sprinkle with 
pecans. Bake at 350 degrees 
for 20 minutes. Serve with 
crackers or tortilla chips. 


. TIME 

Let the 
good tastes 
(cook and) roll 



Chocolate cake: The real American treat that can’t be beat 


J If there is one staple of life that proves “Man 
.does not live by bread alone,’’ it has to be choco- 
,late cake. 

2 They can be as delicate as clouds and so light 
2one fears they will float off the plate or heavy and 
2rich, to remind the palate of the intense induction 
!of calories with every bite. It doesn’t matter, 
|chocolate cake is, without a doubt, a mainstay in 
jthe American diet. Well, in most American diets, 
janyway. It would appear that apple pie may have 
•been overbilled - to many it ought to be: Mom, 
• the flag and chocolate cake. 

2 But oh, the wonderful differences in this treat. 

, There are chocolate angel food cakes, chocolate 
Jtreads, chocolate pudding cakes, chocolate rolls 
;and then, the ultimate, chocolate fudge cake. 

I Here are three recipes for chocolate desserts 
ihat will, without a doubt, delight the palates of 
chocolate lovers or dessert lovers of any age. One 
is a little more difficult, but the results are well 
worth the work. Enjoy! 


GERTIE’S CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE 

13X9X2 Loaf pan, buttered and floured 
2_sticks butter 
4 s quares baking chocolate 
22 cups sugar 
* 4 eggs 

'2 cups chopped pecans or slivered almonds 


just desserts 



1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted 
1/2 teaspoon baking powder 
1 teaspoon vanilla 


Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 

Melt butter with chocolate over hot water. 
Cream sugar and eggs thoroughly and then add 
the chopped nuts and flour sifted with the baking 
powder. Slowly add the melted chocolate and but¬ 
ter, then vanilla. Pour into the prepared pan and 
bake for 15 to 20 minutes. 

Ice the cake, while still warm, with any un¬ 
cooked chocolate icing. 

This recipe is an absolute treasure, and only 
after ha ving enjoyed the results can it be prop¬ 
erly appreciated. 


LAST MINUTE CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE 

9 inch square pan 
1/3 cup butter, melted and cooled 
2 ounces premelted, unsweetened chocolate¬ 
flavoring (2 packages) 

1 egg 

1 cup sugar 
1 1/4 cup flour 
1/2 teaspoon baking soda 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
1/2 teaspoon vanilla 
3/4 cup water 

1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips 
1/2 cup walnuts or pecan halves. 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 

Combine all ingredients except chocolate 
pieces and nuts right in baking pan. Beat with a 
fork until smooth and creamy, about two minutes. 
Scrape bottom and sides of pan with rubber spatu¬ 
la after one minute of beating. Spread batter 
evenly in pan, sprinkle with semisweet chocolate 
chips and arrange nut halves over top. Bake in 
preheated oven about 30 minutes. Cool in pan and 
cut in squares to serve. 

MY FAVORITE CHOCOLATE ROLL 

Cookie sheet, buttered, covered with a layer of 
waxed paper, and buttered again. 


5 eggs, separated 
3/4 cup sugar 

6 ounces sweet chocolate (Baker’s German 
Chocolate Bar) 

3 tablespoons cold water 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

1/2 teaspoon vanilla (nope, that’s not a misprint) 
1 cup heavy cream, for whipping 
3 tablespoons sugar 
Confectioner’s sugar or cocoa 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees 

Beat the yolks and the sugar until lemony. Melt 
chocolate with water and cool. Add to the egg 
mixture with one teaspoon vanilla. Blend well. 
Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour the mix¬ 
ture onto the cookie sheet evenly and bake for 10 
minutes. Reduce heat to 300 degrees and continue 
baking for another 5 minutes or until lightly 
browned. Remove from oven and cover the top of 
the cake with a cold, wet cloth. Chill for one hourJ 
Remove the cloth and loosen the cake from the 
pan. Turn out on fresh waxed paper. Remove the 
bottom paper, now on top, from the cake, peeling 
back carefully. Whip the cream with the 3 tables¬ 
poons sugar and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla until very 
stiff. Spread cake with whipped cream and roll up 
like jelly roll. Dust the top with confectioner’s 
sugar or cocoa for garnish. Refrigerate until 
ready to cut into slices to serve. 


( 
























































fi F Ff f f f jf-FJTirwwmaiw-BiMjr jr •rwi 


associated newspapers 


sports scene 


a 


page 4-b br 


may 13, 1987 




Romulus stuns old 
baseball nemesis 


By TOM MOORADIAN 
ANP Staff Writer 

Coach Dennis Stoh called it 
“his best week as coach.” 

For two good reasons: 
Romulus knocked off Ypsilan- 
ti, the defending class A state 
champs 7-5, and also disposed 
of Dearborn Fordson 14-6. It 
was the first time during his 13 
year tenure as the Eagles’head 
coach that one of his teams has 
managed to beat Ypsilanti or 
Fordson. 

“After a 0-6 start, you can 
understand the frustration the 
team and I had,” Stoh said la¬ 
ter. “This past week was the 
best week we have had around 
these parts in baseball for a 
long time.” 

Romulus came-from- behind 
twice to squelch the state 
champs. The Eagles trailed 2-1 
after three, then grabbed the 
lead 4-2 in the fourth. However, 
Ypsi erupted for three runs in 
its fifth for a 5-4 advantage. 
Then, in the bottom of the sixth 
Romulus came up with the 
sixth and seventh runs for the 
victory. 

Back-to-back homers by 
Kevin Wojtyko, with one 
aboard, and Derrick Ander¬ 
son’s solo blast culminated the 
three-run Romulus rally in the 
fourth. In that pivotal sixth, 
Steve Malgay sliced a two-run 
single with two outs to seal the 


‘‘This past week 
was the best week we 
have had around these 
parts in baseball for a 
long time. ” 

victory. 

Brian Newcomb, who pitch¬ 
ed the fifth and sixth innings, 
got credit for the victory. He 
was relieved by Keith Brothers 
in the seventh. Brothers got the 
save. 

Reliever Jim Clemens suf¬ 
fered the loss for Ypsilanti. 

With five batters - Brad 
Boyd, Brian Newcomb, Jim 
Kusibab, Brothers and Joe 
Schuster - contributing two hits 
apiece, Romulus subdued 
Fordson. Schuster turned in 
with a homer and a double and 
four runs batted in to help re¬ 
liever Steve Hoinka chalk up 
the victory. 

Stoh hopes his Eagles can 
maintain the pace and head 
into the Class A pre-district 
tournament game at Milford in 
stride. 

“This team has turned ev¬ 
erything around and has the 
confidence, I believe, to sur¬ 
prise a lot of other teams before 
the season ends.” 



Heading for Cincinnati 

Former Associated Newspapers’ All-Area runningback, John 
Holifield of Romulus, will have a shot at making it in the National 
Football League. Holifield, a runningback at West Virginia, was 
drafted in the 12th round of the recent NFL draft by the Cincin¬ 
nati Bengals. The 6-1, 208-pound ballcarrier is a 22-year-old 
senior who is majoring in political science. As a prep, Holifield 
played for Coach Don Foley, and the outstanding athlete also 
won letters in basketball. 


State champ 
tests Tigers 
at district 


By TOM MOORADIAN 
ANP Staff Writer 

Belleville has the dubious 
honor today of taking on de¬ 
fending Class A state baseball 
champ, Ypsilanti, in their first 
test of pre-district competition. 

And, on a positive note. 
Coach John Bertz and his club 
appear as ready as they will 
ever be for the state champs. 

Belleville pounded Trenton 
13-1 and 4-1 to sweep a doub¬ 
leheader from its Wolverine ‘A’ 
Conference rivals last week. 
And in the process may have 
found itself a starting pitcher. 

Junior right-hander Blaine 
Armstrong threw 12 strong in¬ 
nings during the week and gave 
up only two runs. 

“Our pitching has really im¬ 
proved, specifically, the per¬ 
formance of Blaine (Arm¬ 
strong) was a highlight last 
week,” said Bertz. “Obviously 
Ypsi won’t be taking chances 
against us and probably will 
throw their number one pitcher 
against us.” 

The doubleheader sweep 
against Trenton lifted Bellevil¬ 
le to a 3-4 won-lost conference 
record. 


The Tigers exploded for four 
runs in the first inning that led 
to losing pitcher Jeff McGre¬ 
gor’s demise. He was relieved 
by Tim Kostreva who marfeged 
to shut Belleville out the rest of 
the way. 

In the opening inning, Steve 
Ostrowski worked McGregor 
for a walk, then Kelly O.’Neal 
drilled a McGregor pitch for a 
double, scoring Ostrowski. Bill 
Ashley stroked a run-scoring 
single for Belleville’s second hit 
and when Pat Ringwelski also 
singled and Ashley scored on an 
error, that was all for McGre¬ 
gor. Kostreva got Rodney Schel- 
lenberger on an infield out, but 
not before Ringwelski managed 
to cross home plate. 

The victory went to Jerry 
Bitner, his first of the 1987^am- 
paign. 

Ostrowski went the distance 
in the 13-1 victory as he struck 
out seven and walked none for 
the victory. Loser Tom Martin 
was yanked in the first inning 
after Belleville tilted the 
scoreboard four times. 

Belleville sealed the decision 

(See BELLEVILLE, page 4-B) 


Parks, Ford find gold at Wayne track Invitational 


By TOM MOORADIAN 

,ANP Staff Writer 

Displaying the strength that 
has established them as one of 
the top prep track teams in the 
area, Wayne Memorial defe¬ 
ated a field of 13 on Saturday to 
retain its own invitational 
track & field championship. 

Under a cloudless skey and a 
tan-offering morning sun. 
Coach Joe Grasley and his 
thinclads claimed eight first 
places and five seconds en 
route to 136 team points and 
their second consecutive 
Wayne invitational title. Ypsi¬ 
lanti was second with 105 
points, followed by Westland 
John Glenn (53), Willow Run 
(40), Plymouth Salem (39), Ply¬ 
mouth Canton (35), Belleville 
(24), St. Martin DePorres (20), 
Garden City (12), Trenton (11), 
Dearborn Heights Crestwood 
(9), Highland Park (6). Ann 
Arbor Huron and Dearborn 
Heights Robichaud failed to 
score a point. 

Grasley was elated at his 
team’s successful defense of 
the title. 

“Against some outstanding 


competition, I felt we showed a 
lot of determination and de¬ 
sire,” Grasley said. “The vic¬ 
tory certainly provides us with 
the momentum we need going 
into a very crucial part of the 
season.” 

Wayne clashes with Monroe 
today and the Trojans, undefe¬ 
ated and state ranked, are 
picked to unseat the champs on 
the Wolverine ‘A’ Conference 
throne. The Zebras will also 
join a throng of local and area 
teams Friday at the Class A re¬ 
gional championships hosted by 
Ypsilanti. 

Wayne received exceptional 
performances from Dave 
King, Steve Hearndon and Dar¬ 
rin Tatum at the invitational. 
Each walked away with a pair 
of gold medals. 

King won the shot put with a 
toss of 48 feet, 11 inches. Team¬ 
mate Steve Warner finished 
second with a 48 feet, 5 inch 
effort. King also claimed a gold 
in the discus, winning with a 
heave of 149 feet. 

Hearndon set the pace in the 
800-meter as he covered the 

distance in 2:02.6. He also cros¬ 
sed the finish line first for the 


300-meter hurdles, leading 
teammate Tony Adams to the 
wire. Hearndon’s winning time 
was 39.1, while Adams had the 
third best time at 40.7. 

In the high hurdles, Adams 
came up with a victory for his 
15.1 performance. 

Tatum dominated the 200 and 
the 400-meter events. He was 
clocked in the winning time of 
22.5 and 50.1 in the events, re¬ 
spectively. 

Wayne’s final gold was 
claimed by Derrick Allen who 
toured the 3200 meter event in 
9:54.5. 

Ypsilanti earned a first in the 
2-mile relay thanks to a 8:15.4 
run with the Zebras trailing in 
second in 8:16.9 thanks to 
Allen, Darnell Hill, Dave Rod¬ 
riquez and Hearndon. 

Westland John Glenn’s Dan 
Liedel continued to dominate 
the distance events as the 
Rocket senior struck gold in the 
1600 meter, beating Allen to the 
wire with a 4:28.6 run. Allen’s 
second place time was re¬ 
corded as 4:31. 

Wayne’s 800-meter relay 
team also was second best with 
Cory Wilson, Adams, Dave 


Rodriquez and Brian Nolan 
who were clocked in 1:32.9. 
Wayne also earned a silver 
with Grasley’s 1,600 meter re¬ 
lay lineup of Tatum, Hearndon, 
Wilson and Rodriquez who lost 
the gold to Ypsi. Ypsilanti’s 
winning time was 3:24.7. 

Ypsilanti came back to 
dominate the girls’ division, 
piling up 100 points more than 
the runner-up. Dearborn 
Heights Robichaud. Ypsi had 
175 team points as compared to 
Ypsi’s 75, followed by Ply¬ 


mouth Salem 53. Wayne and 
Glenn were tied for fourth 
place with 44 points each. High¬ 
land Park was sixth (43); then 
Crestwood (18) and Belleville 
( 11 ). 

Glenn received an outstand¬ 
ing effort from Tanyo Rouser 
in the long jump. She won the 
gold medal with a leap of 15 
feet, 4 1/4 inches. 

Wayne got a silver from its 
3200-meter relay as Christine 
Bayne, Kathy Dillon, Jeanette 
Brown and Lisa Kunz turned in 


the second best time of 10:54.2. 
Bayne also had a silver for her 
2:36 performance in the 800- 
meters. The Zebras’ 400-n3eter 
relay of Burton, Antoiniptte 
Hixon, Annette Hayes'^nd 
Yolanda Brown was clocked in 
53.3. 

.sa 

Wayne was fourth with 
Pauline Freeburn in the 400- 
meter dash (1:05.7) and with its 
1600 meter relay team of 
Tamara Burton, Bayne, 

(See INVITATIONAL, pagq 4-C) 






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May 13. 1^3/ 


Associated Newspapers. Inc. 


rage b-B BR 


Brown, Franchak sign 
college intent letters 


Two notable members of last 
season’s Westland John 
Glenn s outstanding football 
team have made their college 
choices and will be an intricate 
. part of the 1987 college football 
scene this fall. 

Brian Brown and Joe Fran¬ 
chak, named to the Associated 
Newspapers’ All-Area and 
numerous post-season honor 
teams, have signed national 
letters of intent to attend and 
play football on the college 
level. 

Brown, a 5-10, 210-pound 
offensive lineman who 
anchored Glenn’s offensive 
line that was instrumental in 
lifting the Rockets to the state 
Class A semifinals, will play 
his college football at Albion 
College. 

He’ll be joining former Glenn 
teammate, Dan Strehl, on the 

Invitational 

Freeburn and Tangeria Pitts 
(4:37.2). 

Belleville was represented in 
the winner’s circle by double 
gold medal winner Deon Ford 
and sprinter Joe Parks. 

Ford captured a first with a 
leap of 19 feet, 5 1/2 inches in 
the long jump. He also had the 
best performance in the high 
jump, clearing six feet for the 
victory. 

Parks beat all competitors to 
the wire in the 220-yard dash, 
hitting the wire in 23.54. 

Parks and Ford each earned 
silver medals with Parks mis¬ 
sing a double when he finished 


Albion roster. 

In the meantime, Franchak, 
a 6-1, 205-pound center and de¬ 
fensive end, has chosen Ferris 
State College to hone his foot¬ 
ball skills. Franchak will be 
reunited with Rockets Tony 
Svaluto and Don Croft on the 
Bulldog roster. 

Chuck Gordon, Glenn’s 
veteran head grid coach, talked 
' about his two stellar grid play¬ 
ers’ choices. 

‘H’m very confident that 
they'll both do well. Everyone 
connected with the Rocket foot¬ 
ball program is pulling for 
their success.” 

In addition, David Strehl 
signed with Grand Valley and 
all-stater, Mike Hammontree, 
will be heading for Ypsilanti 
and Eastern Michigan Uni¬ 
versity in the fall. 


(Continued from Page 4-B) 

second in the 100-yard dash in 
10.6. Ford’s 2:09.16 was the 
second-best time for the 880- 
yard run. Teammates Greg 
Hardmon contributed a second 
in the 330-yard low hurdles in 
41.70 and Jeff Borders was run¬ 
ner up in the discus with a 135 
feet, 7 inches toss. In the long 
jump, Andre Brantley brought 
home a silver with a leap of 18 
feet, 6 inches. 

Belleville split with Wolver¬ 
ine ‘A’ Conference rivals last 
week. The Tigers turned back 
Wyandotte 86-41 while losing to 
Wayne Memorial, the defend¬ 
ing league champ, 94-34. 


Belleville 

with a six-run sixth inning. 

Ashley came through with a 
pair of hits, collecting two RBIs 
and scored four times, while 
Ostrowski helped his own 
cause with a run-scoring dou¬ 
ble in the sixth. O’Neal chipped 
in with a double and a triple and 
scored twice. 

In a week that saw Belleville 
win three of four, the Tigers 
also crushed Clinton 10-4 at the 
Ann Arbor Tournament as 
Armstrong chalked up his first 


(Continued from Page 4-B) 

victory in his first start The 
good-looking junior had four 
strikeouts and three walks and 
gave up six hits. 

Ashley got to losing pitcher 
Doren Campbell for a triple 
and scored twice and Ostrows¬ 
ki had a double and two runs 
scored. Armstrong also helped 
his cause with a two-run single. 

Belleville launched the in¬ 
vitational with a 17-5 setback at 
the hands of Ann Arbor 
Pioneer. 


Huron has high hopes 
at Class regionals 


The biggest chal¬ 
lenge of the 1987 high 
school track & field 
season awaits area 
teams as they 
attempt to qualify 
for the state finals. 

. Belleville and 
Romulus are sche¬ 
duled to compete on 
Rriday at the Class A 
regional cham¬ 
pionships, while 
New Boston Huron 
will travel to Monroe 
Jefferson on 
o'Saturday. 

: “I believe that we 
have a few kids who 
can survive the re-, 
gional and qualify 
:for state,” said 
Huron Coach Kevin 
Rousch. “But it is 
going to be tough.” 

Athletes must fin¬ 
ish first or second in 
any of the 17 events 
,pr meet qualifying 
distances or times as 
established by the 
Michigan High 
School Athletic 
Association to adv¬ 
ance to the state 
meet. 


In the meantime, 
Rousch is hoping to 
see his mile relay 
team qualify for 
state. His lineup for 
that event includes 
Steve Bartlett, Paul 
Hill, Larry Swick, 
and Jon Tackett 
whose best time is 
around 3:36. 

Trevor Miller has 
a shot at qualifying 
for state in the dis¬ 
cus, according to 
Rousch. Miller has 
had a toss of 136 feet, 
10 inches. Huron’s 
other hopeful is 
Tackett, in the long 
. jump (20 feet, 8 in¬ 
ches). 

Huron swept 11 of 
16 events enroute to 
a lopsided victory 
over Airport. The 
victory evened 
Huron’s conference 
record to 2-2 on the 
season and 3-2 
overall. 

Tackett accounted 


for two of the 11 
firsts as he leaped 20 
feet, 4 in the long 
jump and ran a 10.8 
in winning the 100- 
yard dash. 

The Chiefs domin¬ 
ated the relays as 
Bartlett teamed 
with Ron Rich, 
Swick and Paul Hill 
to finish first in the 
2-mile relay with an 
8:41. In the mile re¬ 
lay, Bartlett again 
led off for the Chiefs 
and Hill, Tackett 
and Swick fashioned 
the winning time of 
3:40. 


Huron also won 
the 440-yard relay 
with Hill, Mitch 
Dwyer, Brad Camp¬ 
bell, and Chris Fos¬ 
ter who turned in the 
winning time of 48.8. 
Hill, Jerry White, 
Campbell and 
Dwyer were the win¬ 
ning combination for 
the 880-yard relay. 

Before Saturday’s 
regional tests, the 
Chiefs have River- 
view and Flat Rock 
to contend with. Flat 
Rock will visit the 
Chiefs’ track on 
Thursday. 


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prep sports colendor 


frock 


Wednesday, May 13 

Garden City at Romulus - 
3:30 p.m. 

Westland John Glenn at Wal¬ 
led Lake Central - 3:30 p.m. 

Farmington Harrison at Ply¬ 
mouth Canton - 3:30 p.m. 

Livonia Franklin at Livonia 
Churchill - 3:30 p.m. 

Plymouth Salem at North 
Farmington - 3:30 p.m. 
Thursday, May 14 
Monroe at Wayne Memorial 
Fordson at Belleville 
Flat Rock at New Boston 
Huron 

Thurston at Robichaud 
Saturday, May 16 
State regional track & field 
championships 


girls' frock 


Wednesday, May 13 
Garden City at Romulus 
Walled Lake Central at West- 
land John Glenn 
Livonia Churchill at Livonia 
Franklin 

Plymouth Canton at Farm¬ 
ington Harrison 
North Farmington at Ply¬ 
mouth Salem 

Thursday, May 14 • 

Fordson at Belleville 
Flat Rock at New Boston 
Huron 

Wayne Memorial at Monroe 


Robichaud at Thurston 
Saturday, May 16 
State championships 
Tuesday, May 19 

Wolverine ‘A’ Conference 
championships at Lincoln Park 


fennls 


Wednesday, May 13 
Wayne Memorial at Romu¬ 
lus - 3 p.m. 

Western Lakes Activities 
Conference Championships at 
Plymouth Salem High School 
Robichaud at Fordson 
Friday, May 15 
Regional Championships 
Saturday, May 16 
Regional championships 


girls' soccer 


Wednesday, May 13 
District championships 
Friday, May 15 

Belleville at Ann Arbor 
Pioneer 


golf 


Wednesday, May 13 
Plymouth Canton at Saline 
Brighton/Pinckney at Ply¬ 
mouth Salem 
Friday, May 15 
Regional championships 


boseboll 


Wednesday, May 13 
New Boston Huron at Airport 


Westland John Glenn at Ply¬ 
mouth Salem , 

Livonia Churchill at Farm¬ 
ington Harrison 
Plymouth Canton at Livonia 
Franklin 

(x) - All games at 4 p.m. unless otherwise 
Indicated. 

Thursday, May 14 

Southgate Anderson at Belle¬ 
ville 

Wayne Memorial at Fordson 
Westland John Glenn at Livo¬ 
nia Franklin 

Robichaud at Willow Run 
Friday, May 15 

Riverview at New Boston 
Huron 

Adrian at Romulus (DH) 
Walled Lake Central at Livo¬ 
nia Churchill (DH) 

Plymouth Salem at Walled 
Lake Western (DH) 

North Farmington at Ply¬ 
mouth Canton (DH) 

Monday, May 18 

New Boston Huron at Flat 
Rock 

Erie Mason at Romulus (DH) 
Westland John Glenn at 
Farmington 

Livonia Churchill at Ply¬ 
mouth Canton 

Walled Lake Western at 
Livonia Franklin 
Plymouth Salem at Livonia 
Stevenson 

Highland Park at Inkster - 
3:30 p.m. 


Tuesday, May 19 
Belleville at Wayne Memo¬ 
rial 

Inkster at Ecorse 


girls' soffboll 


Wednesday, May 13 
Dexter at Belleville (DH) 
Airport at New Boston 
Plymouth Salem at Westland 
John Glenn 

Farmington Harrison at 
Livonia Churchill 
Livonia Franklin at Ply¬ 
mouth Canton 
Inkster at Willow Run 
Thursday, May 14 
Belleville at Southgate 
Anderson 

Ypsilanti at Romulus (DH) - 
3:30 p.m. 

Fordson at Wayne Memorial 
Livonia Franklin at V/est- 
land John Glenn (DH) - 3:30 
p.m. 

I.C. Baptist at Robichaud 
Friday, May 15 

New Boston Huron at River- 
view 

Romulus at Taylor Kennedy - 
6 p.m. 

Livonia Churchill at Walled 
Lake Central (DH) 

Plymouth Canton at North 
Farmington (DH) - 3:30 p.m. 

Walled Lake Western at Ply¬ 
mouth Salem 
Monday, May 18 
Flat Rock at New Boston 
Huron 



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tie Arts & Crafts 60 A 

116 Building Materials 6? 

Business & Offce Eqtjpmeni 63 

Farm Equipment & Supplies 65 

^ Fuel 1 66 

Garden Plants & Supplies 67 

Garden Produce 60 

Lawn & Garden Supplies 64 

4 Q Machmery & Tools 72 

44 Miscellaneous Hems 6i 

43 Miscellaneous Sales 60 

Monuments & Cemetery Lois 4 

Musical Merchandise 73 

45 Sporting Goods 74 

46 Wanted to Buy 82 

'' PETS-LIVESTOCK 

Arvmai Fer>q S5A 


Pets Supplies 50 

Poultry Liveslocli 54 

Riding Horses Stable^. 55 

RECREATION 

Aircraft 73 

Boats & Accessories 75 

RV s 77 

SnowmoOites *6 

REAL ESTATE 

Acreage f*? 

Business Property 102 

Cados & Townrouses kx Sate 106 
Farms & Acreage 103 

Houses lor Sale *05 

Income Property 100 

Lake & Resort 107 

Lots lor Sale nO 


Mobile Homes Lois 104 ^ 

Real Estate toE*chanqe 111,- 

Wanted Real Estate " 

RENTALS 

Apartments for Renf 91 - 

Banquet Hails 92 - 

Business Places k/ Rem 92 

Condos & lownhouses 
lor Rent 9lAr 

Cottages lor Rpnt % T 

Dupieres lor Rem 'X)7 

f arms 4 Land for Rem '0^ 

Garages lor Rerit '*4'^ 

Houses Icr Rem <6^' 

f/ob-ie Homes lor Ren: <17; 

f/oo>ie Home Lots to* Rem % ~~ 

Rooms lor Rert 67 

Storage iM 


page 6-b 


may 13, 1987 


1. Obituaries 


GLADYS G. 
ADLER 

Arc 72. of Howell, died May 8. 
1987. Dear mother of Beverly 
Bichold, Lawrence Adler and 
Nancy Peters, sister of Irene Ho¬ 
ward. Edna John.'ion. Lcla Jen¬ 
nings and Velma Jenson. 10 
grandchildren and 5 great¬ 
grandchildren. Funeral services 
were held May 12. at DAVID C 
BROWN FUNERAL HOME. 460 
' E. Huron River Dr.. Belleville, 
with Rev. Mary E. Hoff officiat¬ 
ing. Interment at Hillside 
Cemetery. 

MARTHA 

ARQUETTE 

Age 44. of Belleville, died May 8. 

• 1987. Beloved wife of David Lee, 

• Sr., dear mother of David L.. Jr., 
and Dianna Lynn, daughter of 
Kenny Arnett and Jeanette 
Krawsezak. sister of Maiy IrN\’in. 

, Denver Carnes, Randall, Delbert, 

- Marie and Sadie Arnett and two 
grandchildren. Funeral services 
' were held May 11 at DAVID C. 

BROWN FUNERAL HOME. 460 
] E. Huron River Dr., Belleville 
with Rev. Walter L. Henning offi¬ 
ciating. Interment at Washtenong 
Memorial Park. 

DONALD W. 

BILLS 

Age 77, of Romulus, died May 7. 
1987. Beloved husband of the late 
Florence, dear father of John and 
Larry, grandfather of Ann. John 
Jr.. Dwayne. Andrea, Nathan and 
Jenny and two great¬ 
grandchildren. Funeral scrs'iccs 
were held May 9 at UHT FUNER¬ 
AL HOME. 35400 Glen wood Road, 
Westland with Rev. David HoUen- 
dcr officiating. Interment at Un¬ 
ion Chapel Cemetery. 

DEREK 
DUPREE 

Age 18. of Westland, died May 9. 
1987. Beloved son of Judith and 
James, dear brother of Lisa, 
grandson of Catherine and Byron 
Dixon, Jimmy Witherspoon and 
Maxey & Gertrude Dupree 
Funeral services will be at the 
UHT FUNERAL HOME. 35400 
Glenwood. Westland. May 13 at 
11:30 a.m.. in state at Kirk of Our 
Savior Church from 12 Noon until I 
p.m. with Rev. Neil Crowley offi 
ciating. Interment will be at Cadil¬ 
lac Memorial Gardens West. 

BEVERLY J. 
FIELHAUER 

Age 44. of Westland, died May 8, 
1987. Beloved wife of James, dear 
sister of Ralph and Roger Schmit- 
Uing. Funeral services were held 
May 11, at LENTS FUNERAL 
HOME. 34567 Michigan Ave., 
Wayne, with Rev. Ralph Fischer 
officiating. Interment at Glen¬ 
wood Cemetery. 

LAWRENCE D. 
FOUST 

Age 88. of Romulus, died May 9. 
1987. Beloved husband of Hazlc B.. 
dear father of Hershel W.. brother 
of Alma Griffin, nine grandchil¬ 
dren and 9 great grandchildren. 
He was a member of Romulus 
senior citizen club. Funeral ser¬ 
vices were held May 12. at BAUM- 
CRANE FUNERAL HOME, 
Romulus. MI, with Rev. Margery 
Schleicher officiating. Interment 
at Romulus Cemetery. 

JOSEPH A. 
GILBERT 

Age 77. of Westland, died May 6. 
1987. Beloved husband of Mary, 
dear father of Michael Sr. and 
Joann Vasely, brother of Sarah 
Sofie. also9grandchildren. Funer¬ 
al services were held May 9 at 
LENTS FUNERAL HOME. 34567 
Michigan Ave.. Wayne with Fr. 
Andrew Nicckarz officiating. In¬ 
terment Cadillac Memorial Gar¬ 
dens West. 

MARLIN C. 
GREEN 

Age 72. of Belleville, died May 9, 
1987. Dear brother of Elmer Stet- 
Uer. Ralph Stcttlcr and Bcaulah 
Thomason, preceded in death by 
his wife, Marie, in 1985. Funeral 
services were held May 11 at 
DAVID C. BROWN FUNERAL 
HOME. 460 E. Huron River Dr., 
Belleville with Rev. Margery 
Schleicher officiating. Entomb¬ 
ment at Michigan Memorial Park. 
Donations to Michigan Cancer 
Foundation or Diabetes Assn, 
would be appreciated. 


JESSE 

JONES 

Age 62. of Bcllcvillo. died May 8. 
1987. Beloved husband of Ernes¬ 
tine. dear father of Roland Weav¬ 
er. Patricia Burke and Gloria 
Lucas, also five grandchildren. 
Funeral services were held May 
11 at UHT FUNERAL HOME, 
35400 Glenwood Road. Westland, 
with Rev. Robert Millar officiat¬ 
ing. Interment at Cadillac Memo¬ 
rial Gardens West. 

DAVID 
McCOY JR. 

Age 74. of Westland, died May 1., 
1987. Beloved husband of Hazel M 
(Longboat), dear father of Roslynn 
E. McCoy-Mesles. Naomi Denise 
Shognosh and David III. grand¬ 
father to Daniel David. Christian; 
Nebeesh, Muhnoomiun. Peshaun- 
quet. Zhahwun. Maggie, Carrie, 
David IV. He was retired from 
Ford Motor Company as an ex¬ 
perimental painter. Funeral ser¬ 
vices were held May 4 at VER- 
MEULEN MEMORIAL FUNER¬ 
AL HOME. Trust Member 100. 
Officiating the funeral was Rev. 
James Severance. Palmer Road 
Baptist Church. Interment at 
Cadillac Memorial Gardens West. 

DALE H. 
MOORE 

Age 56. of Westland, died April 29. 
1987. Beloved husband of Beverly 
J. (Cobb), dear father of Darlene 
Rowden. Kevin. Shaunc Boren. 
Wayne, and Daryl, dear son of 
Harry and Eleanor, 2 brothers and 
3 sisters, also 10 grandchildren. 
He was a wood model maker and 
belonged to Faith Community 
Moravian Church. Canton. Funer¬ 
al services were held May 2 at 
VERMEULEN MEMORIAL 
FUNERAL HOME. Trust Mem¬ 
ber 100. Officiating the funeral 
was Pastor William Myers. Jr. In¬ 
terment at KnoUwood Memorial 
Park. Canton. 

JOSEPH-JOHN 

PRICE 

Age 73, of Belleville, died May 4. 
1987. Beloved husband of Helen, 
dear father of Mrs. John (Gloria) 
Eichenscher. also sui^'ived by 4 
sisters and 2 brothers and 4 grand¬ 
children. He was a member of St. 
Anthony Mens Club. K. of C. 
Wayne. D.N.A. - P.L.A.V. - V.F.W 
Bell. - Bell. Moose. Funeral ser¬ 
vices were held May 7 at PAW- 
LUS-ROBERTS BROS. FUNER¬ 
AL HOME, 209 Main St. BeUevUlc 
with Father Raymond Skoney 
officiating. Interment Michigan 
Memorial Park. 

WANDA C. 
SCHOMMER 

Age 73. of Wayne, died May 6.1987. 
Beloved wife of Frank, dear 
mother of Mclita Meyers, grand¬ 
mother of Darryle and Deborha 
Meyers. Funeral services were 
held May 9 at LENTS FUNERAL 
HOME, 34567 Michigan Ave.. 
Wayne, with Rev. Robert Millar 
officiating. Interment Glenwood 
Cemetery. 

VERNIE E. 
SENIFF 

Age 74. of Taylor, died May 6.1987. 
Beloved husband of the late 
Ariinc, dear lather of Beverly Sul¬ 
livan. Eugene E.. Mrs. William 
(Sharon) Gorring. also7 grandchil¬ 
dren. Funeral services were held 
May 9 at PAWLUS-ROBERTS 
BROS. FUNERAL HOME. 209 
Main St.. Belleville with Edwin 
Hoff officiating. Interment Union 
Udell. 


4. MonumentsCemetery Lots 


CADILLAC MEMORIAL Gar 
dens West, Lots 262. 3 & 4 in Block 
A. Lot 43 Block E (choice areal, 
best offer, all or part, call 419-866- 
6831 after 5 p.m. 


TWO CEMETERY lots. Knoll- 
wood Memorial Gardens, with 2 
vaults Sc 1 double marker, 728- 
3808. 


5. Personals 


AUTO LOANS 

Nations #I credit cstablishcr and 
re-establishcr. 

272-2400 

Day or Night 




^autn-Crane-' 


36885 GODDARD 

ROMULUS 


941-9200 


WILLIAM A. CRANE 





DAVID C. BROWN 

FUNERAL HOME 

460 E. Huron River Drive 

Directors 

DAVID C. BROWN DAYLON R. DANIEL II 

Belleville 697-4500 


FUNERAL 


LENTS HOME 

WE HAVE BEEN SERVING BOTH PROTESTANT 
& CATHOLIC FAMILIES SINCE 1941 
J. Lents T. Lynch G. Elcholtz C. Lenti 

721-5600 34567 Michigan Ave.. Wayiie 


PAWLUS ROBERTS BROS. 
FUNERAL HOME 

Since 1932 

209 Main Street 

Belleville 697-9400 


UHT FUNERAL HOME 

Harold Rediske Jr., Director 

35400 Glenwood Road 
Westland 721-8555 


VERMEULEN MEMORIAL 

FUNERAL HOME 
980 N. Newburgh Road WESTLAND 

Inflation-Prolected 326-1300 ~ TrUSt IC "Z 

Funeral Home 


Funeral Pre-Plan 


6. Legals-Notices 


Charter Township 
of Canton 

POLICE AUCTION 
(PUBLIC ACT 218, 
Public Acts of 1979) 

DATE: SAT . MAY 16, 1987 
TIME; 12:00 NOON - UNTIL 
COMPLETED (Public inspection 
will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 
12:00 noon.) 

LOCATION: 1150 S. CANTON 
CENTER. CANTON TOWNSHIP 
TERMS: CASH ONLY - DAY OF 
SALE 

ITEMS: APPROX. 65 BICYCLES 
RANGING FROM VERY GOOD 
TO VERY POOR CONDITION 
(PARTS) 

ALSO: Various general items - 
tools - lawnmowers - hubcaps. Va- 
riou.s township-owned surplus 
office equipment. Various miscel¬ 
laneous fire department equip¬ 
ment. All equipment must be re¬ 
moved same day - as is basis. NOT 
RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCl 
DENTS. 

John Santomauro. Dir. of Public 
Safety 

Linda Chuhran. Township Clerk 
Publish: May 6& 13. 1987. 


NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by 
the undersigned that on Friday 
May 22. 1987 at 4 p.m. at Bailey's 
Towing. 29333 Hildebrant. Romu¬ 
lus, MI County of Wayne a public 
auction of the following vehicles 
will be held: 

77 Honda 2dr SBC5067547 

77 Chevy 2dr IN69L7J256602 

78 Ply 4dr HL4IC8F154454 

73 Pont 2dr 2L57R3P381116 

73Chev4dr IL69H31154185 

Publish: May 13. 1987 


NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by 
the undersigned that on Friday 
May 22., 1987 at 4:30 p.m. Don’s 
Midwest Towing. 28486 Beverly 
Rd.. Romulus. MI County of 
Wayne u public auction of the fol¬ 
lowing vehicles will be hold; 

76 Ford Sta-Wgn 6H40HI77603 

74 Ford ‘2dr 6G21H228749 

77 Chev 2dr 1Q87U7LSI30*17 

77 VW 2dr 1773550472 

75 Ply Sta-Wgn BB2BE5X12437I 

74 Chev 2dr 1H57H41688255 

81 Dodge 4drlB3BL18B0BD2614I3 
71 Buick 2dr 433721G602765 

71 Chev PU CE141F830506 

72 Toyota 2dr KE20276884 

73 VW 2dr 1332238590 

78 Merc 4dr 8Z66A638534 

Publish: May 13, 1987 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by 
the undersigned that on Friday 
May 22. 1987 at 3:15 p.m. at Cro- 
va’s Towing. 37385 Goddard. 
Romulus. MI County of Wayne a 
public auction of the following 
vehicles will be held: 

76 Ply HP29C6B169929 

74 Kaw MC KH1AX250AE009249 

?? Ford PU FI0YLH56I68 

?? Buick 2dr 444671H180675 

?? Ford PU F26YCF31855 

75 Ford 2dr 5K91LI72260 

78 Dodge 2dr XS22K8R144205 

77 Chev 2dr 1V77B7U167068 

71Chcv2dr 1645711216I03 

?? Sus MC GT55018739 

83 Ford 2drlFABP0449DWI45113 
Publish: May 13. 1987 


“GET LEGAL” 

Building License 
Seminar 
By 

Jim Klausmeyer 

-Building Trades 
-Homeowneis 
-Apartment Owners 

Prepare for the 
May State Test 

Limited Enrollment 
Instructor 
Dave Hatflied 

(313) 941-0062 

Sponsored by 
BeflevflIeYan Buren 

Community Education 

697-9123 


LARGE 

BOLD 

TYPE 

Attracts more 
Readers! 

Remember to use bold 
type in your next 
classified ad* 


NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC SALE 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by 
the undersigned that on TYic.sday. 
May 19.1987. at 10:00a.m. at West- 
land Police Impound Yard. 37501 
Cherry Hill Road. Westland. MI.. 
County of Wayne a public auction 
of the following vehicles will be 
held: 

71 Plymouth RP23G1G20.5861 
75 Chev CGY255U7I2I790 

74 Ford 4XI0Y282I32 

78 Moped 3026282 

74 Olds 3N39K4M 219220 

66 Ford 6H3IT191775 

78 Chev 1B68E8Y186689 

75 Buick .tR57H5H 125086 

Publish; May 1.3. 1987 


LEGAL NOTICE 
NOTICE OF APPLICATION 
Notice is hereby given that Manu¬ 
facturers National Bank of De¬ 
troit. Manufacturers Bank Tower. 
100 Renaissance Center. Detroit. 
Michigan 48243 has filed an ap¬ 
plication with the Comptroller of 
the Currency on May 14, 1987 as 
specified in 12 CFR 5 of the Com¬ 
ptroller's Manual lor Notional 
Banks, for permission to establish 
a domestic branch at the following 
location: 

Southeast comer of 
Joy Road and Morton-Taylor 
Road, 

Canton. Michigan 48187 
Any person wishing to comment 
on this application may file com¬ 
ments in writing with the Deputy 
Comptroller of National Banks. 
440S. LaSalle. Suite 2700. Chicago. 
Illinois 60605. within 30 days after 
the date of this publication. The 
non-confidential portion.^ of the 
application are on file with the De¬ 
puty Comptroller as part of the 
public file. This file is available for 
public inspection during regular 
business hours. 

Publish; May 13. 1987 


8. Entertainment 



ROBERT EUGENE GAINER, 
PLEASE contact your mother. She 
needs your help. 

595-8651 



HYPNOSIS HELPS WITH 

• WEIGHT CONTROL 

• STOP SMOKING 

• Phobias 

• Insomnia & Much More 
LOIS MUNKACHY, Ph.D. 


PAST-LIFE THERAPY IS 
OUR SPECIALTY 

UNIVERSAL SELF-HELP CENTER, INC.^ 

51 E. HURON RIVER DR. 

BELLEVILLE - 697-7480 


.TY _ 

w 


MUSIC FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS 
Contemporary • Rock 
Specializing in 
Weddings 

•GAILORDS ” 

Call for Informotion 

676-8535 

DISC JOCKEY 

Professional Sound 
and Light Show. 
Largest in Michigan. 
Competitive Prices 
After you’ve seen and 
heard the rest 
(Book the Best)! 

D&G 

RECORDINGS 

277-8975 

BUS FOR HIRE. Family reun 
ions, groups, churches, etc Call 
between 11 7, 7294)630_ 

Weddings Banquets 

Jerry Ma.sscy 
Professional Singer 
All Occasions 
SPRING OFFER 
595^1969 

METRO DETROIT PARENTS 
Without Partners will be having a 
Metro Dance on Sal. May 23. 1987 
from9pm to lam alThc Democra- 
Uc Club. 23400 Wick Rd. Taylor. 
MI. Music by D J. Cash Bar $4.00 
members. $5 00 public. For more 
information call 562-2523 or 8S5- 
1208 eves 

9. Lost and Found 


LOST; BLACK dog with 
white chest, medium 
sized cockapoo, Cherry 
Hill/Wayne Rd. area, 
Westland, 595-0530. 

REWARD. 


FOUND. COCKER spaniel. 721- 
1859. 


FOUND: MAY II. small black, 
long haired dog, could be Minia¬ 
ture Dachshund, vicinity of Avon¬ 
dale Sc Woodbome. 728-8273. 


ATTENTION 

JOBS SERVICES AVAIUBLE 
IN YOUR COMMUNITY 

You will be able to go to your City Hall or Community 
Center to find out about The Downriver Community 
Conference 
JOBS PROGRAM 
We will be in your Community on: 


May 4 

9am-11:30am 

Taylor 

Monday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Romulus 


1:30pm-4pm 

Lincoln Park 

May 5 

* 9am-11:30am 

Flat Rock 

Tuesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Brownslown 


1:30pm-4pm 

Southgate 

May 6 

9am-11:30am 

Wyandotte 

Wednesday 



May 7 

9am-11:30am 

Gibraltar 

Thursday 

1:30pm-4pm 

River Rouge 

May 8 

9am-11:30am 

Allen Park 

Friday 

2pm-4pm 

Melvindale 

May 11 

9am-11:30am 

Riverview (comm, cen.) 

Monday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Grosse lie 

May 12 

9am-11:30am 

Rockwood (comm, cen.) 

Tuesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Ecorse 

May 13 

9am-11:30am 

Trenlon 

Wednesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Woodhaven 

May 18 

9am-11:30am 

Taylor 

Monday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Romulus 


1:30pm-4pm 

Lincoln Park 

May 19 

9am-11:30am 

Flat Rock 

Tuesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Brownstown 

May 20 

9am-11:30am 

Wyandotte 

Wednesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Southgate 

May 21 

9am-11:30am 

Gibraltar 

Thursday 

1:30pnrh4pm 

River Flouge 

May 22 

9am-1130am 

Allen Park 

Friday 

130pm-4pm 

Melvindale 

May 26 

9am-1130am 

Riverview (comm, oen.) 

Tuesday 

1:30pm-4pm 

Grosse He 

May 26 

9anv1130am 

Rockwood (comm, oen.) 

Tuesday 

1.30pm-4pm 

Ecorse 

May 27 

9am-11.30am 

Trenton 

Wednesday 

130pm-4pm 

Woodhaven 


•Unless otherwise noted, services will be available at your 
City or Township Hall. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at 

283-9700 

equal opportunity program 


31. Help Wanted Sales 
WANTED-SALES 

Reliable person for plumbing re¬ 
tail .store Must have experience in 
sales. Pari or full lime. Call 722- 
4170 

BUY OR SELL AVON $5 to start, 
if you are in need of a rep. call 
697-1447._ 

PARTY PLAN 
EXPERIENCE? 

Conlcmpo Jewelry will appoint 
mgrs. to lop position, average 
$300-600/Wk . ideal for ladies. 292- 
532-1 or 291-.5340. 

PARTY PLAN people, if you need 
money, love lingerie. Undercover- 
Wear is for you. .595-7436. 

EXPERIENCED SALESPER¬ 
SON for window and siding com¬ 
pany. Our salesmen make be¬ 
tween $600-1200 per week. Two 
positions available, call 722-3333. 

32. Help Wanted 

CASHIERS $22.5-275 WKLY 
WILL TRAIN 

NOW HIRING. INC. .543-7800 

DEMONSTRATORS 

NEEDED 

Do you like people^ Arc you avail¬ 
able F'riday Sc Saturday of the 
week? Need extra income? We 
arc busy and in need of more rep¬ 
resentatives. Free training, call 
846-7092 Monday - Friday, 10-12 
noon or 1-3 pm for interview. 

RECEPTIONIST $250 WKLY 
WILL TRAIN CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543-7800 

ADULT COUNTER Saleslady 
wanted for part time ice cream 
and candy work. Experience help¬ 
ful but not necessary. Corden’s 
Candy Carousel. 26300 Michigan 
Ave . Inkster. 565-2505 


COMPUTER POSITIONS 
WILL TRAIN CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543-7800 

LIVE IN light housekeeping, 
an.swcr phone, single dad. I child, 
free room, board, .salary, ideal for 
responsible person over 18. 682- 
.m 5 ._ 

PAINTERS $8-12 HRLY 
NO EXPERIENCE 
NOW HIRING. INC 54,3-7800 

Work While Children 
Are In School 

Permanent part lime file clerks in 
the Wayne. Plymouth and Farm¬ 
ington Hills area, flexible hours, 
no nights or weekends, .send re¬ 
sume to: T F'rancis. P.O. Box 
3635,5, Gro.sso Poinlc. MI 482:16. 

AIRLINE JOBS 

WILL TRAIN CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC. .543-7800 

CANTON 

AREA 

Blue Jean Jobs 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
Come with a friend and work 
together, cam and Icam. call TSl. 
280-9711 


CONSTRUCTION $10-15 HRLY. 

NO EXPERIENCE 
NOW HIRING, INC .543-7800 


LPN’s/RN’s 

starting salary based on years of 
experience, immediate full be¬ 
nefit package, desirable location, 
opportunity for advancement, 
flexible hours, all shifts available, 
full and part lime. Van Buren Con¬ 
valescent Center. 44401 1-94 Ser¬ 
vice Dr., or call 697-8061 


NURSES 

AIDES 

all shifts available, full and part 
time, paid orientation, competi¬ 
tive salary. Van Buren Convales¬ 
cent Center. 44401 1-94Service Dr., 
or call 697-8051. 


DRAFTING $10-14 HRLY. 
WILL TRAIN CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC 543-7800 


MACHINE SHOP 

Temporary assignments near 
your home, apply at 

SOMEBODY 

SOMETIME 

23400 Michigan Avenue at Outer 
Drive. Dearborn. 565-3.500. 


EXPERIENCED 

PAINTERS 

728-9169 45.3-1.388 


MANAGER TRAINEE 
$250-100 WK 

MALE FEMALE CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC. .543-7800 


HAIRCARE 

CLINICS 

hiring full time licensed cosmeto- 
logi.sts. Advanced training, sal¬ 
ary. paid bcnclits. don’t delay! 
Call John Ryan Associates today. 
I-H00-.552-4870 


DRIVERS $250-125 WKLY 
NO EXPERIENCE 
NOW HIRING. INC .543-7800 

HOSPITAL JOBS ! 

$6-12 HRLY WILL train' 

NOW HIRING. INC 543-7800 


The Rampart Security 

now has immediate openings, full 
or part lime. $3 7.5-$9.I3 per hour. 
Ypsilanti-Belleville-Romulus 
area, must have vaUd Michigan 
driver’s license and vehicle. Apply 
in person only. Mon-Fri. 10am - 
4pm. 777 E Eisenhower Parkway. 
Ann Arbor. 


LABORERS $10 HRLY : 
NO EXPERIENCE - 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543-7800 


REHABILITATION 
AIDES 

We re dedicated to highest quality 
in our small unique rehabilitation 
center, you will be trained by our 
professional rehab, team, apply 
only if you arc a sensitive, hard 
working person who wants an 
achieving job in health care, call 
911-1142. E O E 


MAIL CLERK 

WILL TRAIN CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543-7800 


COLLEGE 

STUDENTS 

Temporary jobs available in bir»- 
dcry and liKht as.scmbly. apply at 

SOMEBODY 

SOMETIME 

23400 Michigan Avenue, at Outer 
Drive. Dearborn. 565-3.500. 


AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR 
NO EXPERIENCE 
NOW HIRING. INC. .543-7800 


SECRETARY 

12 noon - 8 p.m. 

SALES 

Apply within Joy Hall. Joy Road .3 
blocks E. of Middlebelt. behind 
Dominos. 


CARPENTER TRAINEE 
$8-12 HRLY. CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING. INC .543-7800 

Groundsman 
lor apartment complex, call 261- 
8010. 


HANDYMAN PORTER 

to Close lounge six nlgliis a week. Hve 
liours a nlgtit. Must be a non-drinker and 
have a supplemental disability or retire¬ 
ment Income. 


Call Greg 
729-4324 


NOW HIRING 

BUSSERS 

Full Time 
^3.50 

APPLY IN PERSON- 


BOB EVANS RESTAUFIANT 
FORD RD. & 1-275 
CANTON 


ACCOUNTANT 

Dynamic, expanding service organiza¬ 
tion is seeking a "take charge” indi¬ 
vidual for its corporate staff located in 
the Metropolitan Detroit area. If you 
have: 

• A Bachelor’s degree in accounting 

• 2 to 3 years public accounting ex¬ 
perience 

• Excellent analytical skills, and en¬ 
joy supervising others 

We may have what you are looking for. 
We offer an excellent salary and benefit 
package as well as an opportunity to 
interact with top management. Please 
send your resume and salary require¬ 
ments in confidence to: 

Director of Finance 
P.O. Box 294 

Sterling Heights, MI 48311-0294 
Equal Opportunity Employer 


Work Available 
Immediately 

Register At Our 
Belleville Office 

Recruiting men & women for 
light in(justrial & clerical work in 
Belleville area, (days & after¬ 
noons. 

CALL 699.-1033^^ 

visit our new office located in the 
back of H & R Block Bldg, on the 
South Side of Main St. 

369 Main St. 

Office hours 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

1^1 |\|^lyGirl 

IXLL J People 

SERVICES 

Equal Opportunity EmplOYer M/f/H 




SUMMER JOBS 



|Funded through Downriver 

Summer Youth Employment 
& Training Program 
(SYETP) 

SYETP offers the opportunity for youth age 14- 
21, to gain practical work experience, earn 
money, and develop new skills through employ¬ 
ment in a summer job. Worksites for SYETP will 
include: 

- porks and recreational areas 

- schools 

- municipalities 

- hospitals 

- day core centers ond community centers 

- public, non-profit corporations 

To qualify you must live in one of the Downriver 
communities, be 14-21 years of age and meet 
Federal Income guidelines. Handicapped and spe¬ 
cial education youth also qualify. 


Community Conference 
Michigan Youth 
Corps 
(MYC) 

If you ore on unemployed Michigan resident be¬ 
tween the ages of 18-21, you con be working this 
summer! The Michigan Youth Corps will offer sum¬ 
mer jobs which ore: 

- 6-12 weeks long 

- 30-40 hours per week 

- paying $3.35 per hour 
Worksites for Youth Corps jobs will include: 

- state and local porks and recreotionol areas 

- highways (not construction work) 

- public non-profit corporations, institutions and 
colleges 

- municipalities 

- day core centers 

- recreation departments 

- hospitals 


How to apply: 


IN PERSON: 

16121 Eureka Road 

(between DIx & Allen) SOUthgate 


BY PHONE: 
Call 

284-5088 


Equal Opportunity Program 















































































































































May 13. 1987 


Mbsocialed Newspcipetti, me. 


32. Help Wanted 


PACKERS 

NoiHicd for all Ihixv shift.s. Apply 
Mon. - Fri. fwmHa.m. lo-liilUp.lp. 
at \'^\ Mix R(l.. Weslland. 


drivers wanted, male or 
(cmalo. part lime, full time, apply 
in person Wayne & Brownie.s Cab. 
:UiIIP Michigan Ave.. Wayne. 


LI MO DRIVERS $425 WK 

MALE FEMALE WILL TRAIN 
NOW HIRING. INC. .54:1 7800 

LPNS OR RNS for afternoon and 
midnight shift, apply in person 
Livonia Nursing Center. 2Si)IO Ply¬ 
mouth Road, Livonia. 


NURSE 

in our progressive elosetl-head in¬ 
jury rehabilitation renter, we’re 
dedicated to the highest quality 
care. To complete our excellent 
loam, we're looking for a high 
energy LPN or RN to work lull 
time midnights. Part lime RN or 
LPN position al.so available. For 
moix' information, please call O-II- 
1142 or send resume to: Applelree 
L;ine. :UKKKt Cha.se Rd. Romulus. 
MI 48174. 

EOE M/F 

IVIaintenance Man 

for apartment complex. Must be 
ex|>erienced. Call 261-8012. 


HELP IS 
AS NEAR AS 
YOUR PHONE 

• Need A Job Or Schooling? 

• Need Healthcare But You’re 
Out of Work? 

• Need Help in Finding 
Answers To Your Problems? 


CALL THE 
DCC HOTLINE 
TODAY AT 

283-9700 


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM 


FLEET SERVICE 

American Trans Air is present¬ 
ly hiring individuals in its fleet .ser¬ 
vice department (cleaning & 
stocking of the aircraft) for our 
Detroit base. Applicants with pre¬ 
vious hotel housekeeping, janito¬ 
rial upkeep, etc. are encouraged 
to apply. Days & hours will be 
ba.scHl on aircraft movement. De¬ 
pendable transportation a must. 
Some heavy lifting required. 

Applications will be taken Mon¬ 
day thru Friday. 8;:i0 a m. & Il ;:i0 
a m. (attention Sally Porter) at 
American Trans Air Bldg., 719 W 
5>ervico Rd.. Detroit Metro Air¬ 
port Phone inquiries will be taken 
Monday thru Friday btwn 8::U) & 
9:30 a.m. )942-4(i:ifi). E.O.E/AA. 


PAINTER 

wanted. Also, must do small 
patchwork. Call (>97-4137 for phone 
interview. 


DANCERS WANTED, lop pay. 
must be 18, apply within BT’s, 
14417 Michigan Avenue. Dcar- 
boni. 313-8-10-4(^0 ask for Linda. 


ANN ARBOR AREA manufactur¬ 
er is now accepting applications 
for the following positions 
PROFILE EXTRUSION 
TECHNICIAN 

applicants must have a strong 
mechanical background, capable 
of developing dyes, setting up 
jobs, and trouble shooting equip¬ 
ment. 

MATERIAL HANDLER appli¬ 
cants must be familiar with plas¬ 
tic injection molding machinery'. 

MACHINE OPERATORS ap- 
plieants must be experienced 
machine operators for second and 
third shifts. 

We offer a competitive salary, 
benefits and profit sharing Send 
resume to: P.O. Box M-If>88, Ann 
Arbor. Mich. 48108 and/or 973- 
1120 . 


EARN EXTRA CASH over $100 
in a month • by donating plasma 
Receive $18 on your first donation 
with this ad only! YPSILANTI 
PLASMA CENTER. 813 W. Michi¬ 
gan Ave.. Ypsilanti. 482-8790. 




ATTENTION 




COLLEGE STUDENTS 
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
Job Description: 

Assembly - Packaging - Warehouse 


• NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

• MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE 

• MUST HAVE OWN TRANSPORTATION 

• MUST BE ABLE TO WORK 8 HOUR SHIFTS 

COME IN TODAY 

_ 9-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday _ 

SOMEBODY SOMETIME 

UVONIA 

19203 Merriman (Comer of 7 Mile) 

(Village Fashion Mall) 


COME JOIN 
THE BEST AT 
E.T.S. 

We offer you the career counseling 
and alternatives best suited to 
achieving your goals. Tempor¬ 
aries earn respect, learn new 
skills and make new friends while 
working at choice suburban cor¬ 
porations, We offer good pay and 
bonuses for your good clerical 
skills. Call Judy, Monday thru Fri¬ 
day. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

EMPLOYERS 

TEMPORARY 

SERVICE 

m-nm 42.'>-5770 

Never a fee! 


GRINDER 
I D., O.D. 

Surface grinders wanted, must 
have own t(x>l.s and .S years experi' 
cnee. Carbide experience a plus 
good wages and excellent be 
nefits. Apply: Moeller Manufae 
turing. 4772r> Michigan Ave.. Can 
ton. iK'tween H::U) am - 3 pm. 

Cashiers Needed 

exciting position available for peo¬ 
ple who want to work, experience 
is required. Apply in person at: 
Acroplex Newsstands. South Ter¬ 
minal. Detroit Metro Airport, or 
call for appt. at 9-12-4657. 
JANITORIAL CLEANERS. Men 
& women. Part time evenings in 
Wayne area. Call weekdays 3 p.m 
4:30 p.m. at 675-:t328. 


r^age 7-3 


CASHIERS 

no exp. needed, students welcome, 
$4 per hour, days-afternodns- 
rnidnights. full time/part time. 
Apply at: 

TOTAL SERVICE STATIONS 
Schoolcraft & Merriman 
Schoolcraft & Farmington 
Livonia 

Ann Arbor & Lillcy 
Mill & Wilcox 
Plymouth 


WE ARE NOT FOOLING ... Clas- 
sific<l Ads will get results for you. 
Call 729-3300 to advertise! 


DIRE(Tr CARE staff. Mature and 
assertive individuals needed to in¬ 
struct the mentally impaired. Re¬ 
quirements: high school diploma, 
valid driver’s licen.se and excel¬ 
lent verbal skills, afternoon and 
midnight positions open. $4.25-4.50 
an hour, near Metro Airport. Call 
Miss Gurskey at 753-4804 between 
11 a.m. 3 p.m. only. 

Immediate 

Employment 

Garden City carpet store needs 
part time phone solicitors. Earn 
up to $6 per hour. Great for stu¬ 
dents and homemakers, call 261- 
7700. 


AUTOMATIC 
SCREW MACHINE 

A major supplier to the aircraft 
industry needs experienced sel up 
operators for: 1'/i RAH Acme 
Grindley. 2'/4-6 Wickman & Brown 
and Sharpe #2 Ultramatic auto¬ 
matic screw machines. Good 
working conditions, wages and be¬ 
nefits. Apply MocUcr Mfg., 47725 
Michigan Ave. Canton btwn 
a.m. - 3 p.m. 


EXCELLENT INCOME taking 
short phone messages at home. 
For info, call 504-649-7922 Ext 
1H(MA. 


NOW HIRING 

Full & Part-time Waitresses 
Earn Top Dollar 
Days St Nights 
No Experience 
Necessary 
Apply in Person 

Greg’s Emergency Room Lounge 
311,50 Palmer 
at Merriman 


COUNTER 

PERSON 

Bray’s Hamburgers. :J5650 Ford 
Rd.. Westland. $4 plus per hour. 



MSTAUflAMTt 

MANAGEMENT 

DEVELOPMENT 

The largest family restaurant chain in the state of 
Michigan, has immediate positions for Managers avail¬ 
able for all levels of Management In the Ann Arbor & 
Dearborn area. 

We offer the best benefit package in our industry, 
competitive starting salaries, plus a bonus pro¬ 
gram & excellent opportunity for advancement. If you 
are currently employed in an unchallenging stagnant 
position, if you enjoy the one on one contact with 
people and feel you can hire, delegate, organize & 
motivate others. .. Then we would like to talk to you. 
Submit a resume, a personal letter or you may apply 
in person at the following location. 

Elias Brothers 
Corporate Headquarters 
Personnel Office 
4199 Marcy 
(10 mile & Ryan Rd.) 

Warren. Mi. 48091 


EO.E 


M/F 


MANAGEMENT TRAINEES 

The Road to Success... 

. . .is with ua. Detroit area transportation 
company is looking for individuals to join 
our local operations. If you; 

• Have a degree in transportation or 
management 

• Are available to work all shifts 

• Have a general knowledge of the 
Detroit geographical area 

We are what you are looking for! We offer: 

• Exposure to top management 

• On-the-job training 

• Excellent starting salary and benefit 
package 

• Growth opportunities 

Don’t hesitate. Send your resume today to: 
Operations Manager 
P.O. Box 294 

Sterling Heights, MI 48311-0294 
Equal Opportunity Employer 



• busiMts 

• prof^Mionol 


diredoiy 


associated newspopers 


Coll 729-3300 or 697-9191 for Roto Infomtotion 


Ak Coodirioning 


BuiMAg SiippHos 


CorpoAfry 


CoAstructioA 


BRENNAN’S 
HEATING, COOLING 
& REFRIGERATION 

Commercial & Residential 

722-1145 

24 Hour Service 


AhjmiAum Sidfatg 


Fiberglass & Asphalt 
Roofing Products 
Singles from $18.99 
7-4 :30 M-K 
7:30-12:00 SAT. 

Metro Wholesale 

41700 Michigan 
Canton. Va mile W. of 1-275 

397-0178 

’ Ask About Our Super-plu.s 
Labor Saving Metric Shingles 


WOW! 

WHAT A CARPENTER!!! 
All work done 

Low Prices Free Estimates 
’’Everything a Specialty” 

699-9102 

Gregg Nanci Steve 


ALUMINUM SIDING 
SECONDS 

from 37.95 sq. 

We also carry a complete line 
STORM WINDOWS and DOORS 

Call ASTRO 
ALUMINUM CORP. 
at 291-5900 


AppKoAC* lUpoir 


Siding. Trim. Seamless 
Aluminum Gutters $1.50 
per foot. Thermal Vinyl 
•’ Replacement & Storm 
Windows 

FAMILY OPERATED 

UCENSED INSURED- 

292-3423 654-28871 


Wholesale 
PrIcesI 
ROOFING 
-AU TYPE8- 

• Shingles 

(20 Year Warr.) 

• Coatings 

• Felt Paper 

MWN RIVHI 
BUK. SUPPUES 

24344 Ecorse Rd. 
(Nr. Telegraph) 

201-7350 


CEDAR DECKS 

Only Quality Material 
is Used • 

Built to Last and at 
A Very Reasonable Price 
For Free Estimate 
CaU Bob 

729-4569 


G & T Construction 

Roofing & Cement 

• NEW ROOF 

• RE-ROOF 

• SHINGLES 

• DRIVEWAYS 

• PATIOS 

• SIDEWALKS, etc. 

• NEW PORCHES 
& EXTENDED 
PORCHES & 

REPAIR 

Senior & Retiree 
Discounts 

24 hr. Emergency Repair 

For Free Estimate 
Call 729-8406 


Eie<fricoi CoAlrocfors 


WHIPPLE ELECTRIC 
COMMERCIAL. INDUSTRIAL, 
RESIDENTIAL 
Maintenance St installations 
Services, violations. 

ceiling fans. 

Ucensed, insured. 

24 hour service. 

946-4688 


Carpet Cleaning 


METRO-WEST 
CARPET STEAM 

Carpet steam cleaning spe¬ 
cial: Living room St hall $20 
Spring Special 

Living room St hall $20 

Bedroom walkways $5 

397-9767 


LAMANCE 
FENCE CO. 

Free Estimates 

697-9399 


CefMAt/ Conavte 


DR. WALT’S 
$10 HOUSE CALL 

8 years of fast, dependable 
service 

★ Refrigeration 
★ Appliances 

941-4440 


BuDdezIng/TruckiAg 


BULLDOZING 

TRUCKING 

SAND Sc GRAVEL 
Driveways Repaired 
No Job Too Small 

H. Tkachuk 
& Sons 
Call 941-1467 


LAMBERTO 

CONSTRUCTION 

CORP. 

ALL TYPES OF 
CEMENT WORK 
No Job Too Big 
or Too Small 
Licensed & Insured 

455-2925 

FREE ESTIMATES 


R&S 

CONSTRUCTION 

CONCRETE WORK 
HOME REMODELING 
GARAGES - ADDITIONS 
DRIVEWAYS 
SIDEWALKS 
DECKS - PORCHES 
BLOCK FOUNDATIONS 
CARPENTRY St 
ALUMINUM 
NEW St REPAIR WORK 
UCENSED BUILDER 
25 YEARS 

WAYNE WESTLAND 
FREE ESTIMATES 

BOB 

422-6444 427-7566 


DISCOUNTED WIRING 
SUPPLIES 
Bratcher Electric 
35728 Van Bom. Wayne 
722-0037 


Fencing 


JOHNSON 

BROTHERS FENCE 

Residential & Commercial 
All Types of Fence 
Chain Link St Wood 
No Job Too Small 

942-9070 


Drywoll 


Horn* 

ImfrovMMOt 


Asphalt Paving Phimhing 0 Excavating 


E. MARTIN 

CEMENT & TRUCKING 

Driveways, garage floors. 
Sidewalks St Porches 
SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT 

722-4652 


DRYWALLING 

PLASTERING 

DrywaU installed or 
repair, piaster St drywall 

Good Service 
Good Prices 
722-0586 


KITCHENS 

Additions, Baths. Rec. 
Rooms, Siding, Replacement 
Windows. Cabinets. Counter 
Tops. Painting. 

WM. McNamara 

LICENSED BUILDER 

459-2186 


Bactrkal Contractors 


BEN MEYER’S 
ASPHALT 

We specialize in sealing and 
paving. 

- LICENSED - 

941-5498 


HURON CLINTON 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Sewers, water lines. Have your sewer and 

plumbing other plumbing installed 

Uednsed Master only by a licensed 

Plumber master plumber. 

941-3799 


REY-MART 
ASPHALT 

Driveways. Parking Lots. Seal 
Coating, Bulldozing and Grading. 
STATE UCENSED 
- Office Hours 8 to 5 

. 941-5580 


Printing 


eagle graphics 


Dathrooms 


Ceramic Tile 

Bathroom Remodeling 
Kitchen Remodeling 
Corian Marble St Formica 

KEN FISHER 
721-8656 


Quality typesetting 
and printing 
Call Carmeledia Clark 

729-4000 


ROWE SUPPLY CO., JNC. 'SZ 

33920 Van Bom, Wayne, Ml Industry 

(Wholesale and Retail) 

“OVER 11,000 ITEMS” 

AIR CONDITIONERS. AIR COMPRESSORS, MICRO WAVE OVENS. 
MOTORS. IDOLS. LIGHT BULBS. COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 


721-4081 


WHEN fT COMES TO ELECTRICITY 

PRO IS ROWE” 

ROWE ELECTRIC, INC. 

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial 

We Repair Hi Bay & Parking lot Lighting 

_ 721-4080 


Improvement 


RrfT»o0eirfv> 

Cvttxfy 


fMr.nBuUd 

.4i//hi AU untin ittk nvl. 

Marengere & Associates, inc. 
274-6663 

• ROOFING • SIDING 
• GARAGES • ADDITIONS 
• KITCHENS • BATHS • REC 
ROOMS • DECKS • WOOD. 
CLAD St VINYL WINDOWS 
•STEEL. WOOD & STORM 
DOORS 

Anything You Need 
We Do Our Own Work 
Aja#rlca's Total 
Property Service TOom' 

E icr aUH nConip.ini . 
inaepenafnry O^eo .ma Opef.iie>j 
-•lOa^R-eUILO INTERNATIONAL 


Landscaping 


TOP SOIL 
SAND & GRAVEL 
LANDSCAPE 
SUPPLIES 

397-3120 722-0150 


ROTOTILLING 
Large Area 
Grass cutting 

Lawn Grading St Leveling 
Plowing Si Discing 

72M053 397.^1 

FREE ESTIMATES 


lawn Waintenonce 


FertUizing - Lawn 
Sprang 

Crabgrass, Weed Sc Insect 
Control 

QUALITY - Licensed St Insured 
SERVICE - Prompt, 
careful St personalized 
PRICE - low COST 
APPUCATION PLUS 
PREPAID DISCOUNTS. 
SPECIAL 
INSECT 
CONTROL 
$18 

Reg. $25 for an average 
3,0(» sq. ft. lawn 
CALL FOR FREE 
ESTIMATES 

Supreme 
Lawn Service 
RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 
INDUSTRIAL 

941-2760 


To Advertise 

Call 729-3300 



lawn'Moint»nQnc» 


MICHIGAN LAWN 
MANAGEMENT 

Complete professional lawn 
care. For free estimate call 

461-9729 


maintenance 


CONTRACT 
MAINTENANCE 
Industrial, commerical 
janitorial services. 
Two weeks free if not com¬ 
pletely satisfied. 
References 
941-5785 


Manuments 


Sff WHAT TOO tUT Al 
NUCMCAMS LAtCfST ULtCUON 

Allen ^ 

'^nonimentsbic. 

590 S MAIN STIEET 
NOfiTHVUIE. MICHIGAN 4il6J 
FM (313) 34^-0770 


P€iinfin9 


INTERIOR-EXTERIOR 

PAINTING 

Specializing in Quality, 
not production painting 
Free Estimates 
REFERENCES 

JOSEPH 563-8229 

Leave message 


A & H PAINTING CO. 

All Work Guaranteed 

• Wall doctor on duly 

• Drain surgeon on call 

• Tub enclosurc.s $149.(X) 

326-1838 


M & B Painting 

15 Years Experience 
Interior & exterior painting, 
wall papering, drywall repair, 
stucco, ceilings. 
Quality Work Free Estimates 

Call Mark • 261-4943 


p«st control 


KILL PESTS 

To exterminate roaches, 
fleas, rats St other pests. En¬ 
forcer Product.^ are the 
strongest you can buy. 
Guaranteed! Available at 
Ace Hardware, Tru Value 
Hardware St other partici¬ 
pating hardware stores. 


Roofing 


BARNETT 
ROOFING & SIDING 

★ RESIDENTIAL ★ 

A COMMERCIAL ★ 

★ INDUSTRIAL ★ 
Shingles - Single Ply - Built-up 
Licensed St Insured 
FREE ESTIMATES 
Over 28 years experience built 
into every job 

41700 Michigan Ave.. Canton 

397-8122 


ALL PRO 

Roofs o Gutters • Siding 
New St Repairs 
PROFESSIONAL 
Reasonable Reliable 
Licensed St Insured 
ALL AREAS 
John Williams 776-5167 


JOHN PRAYER 
ROOFING 

COMMERCIAL 

RESIDENTIAL 

Free Estimates 

19270 Middlebelt 
Romulus 

(313) 753-4160 


PRICE RIGHT 
ROOFING 

Best Quality Work in Town 
LICENSED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

291-8180 


J & B ROOFING 
HOT ROOFING 

Shingles, tear offs, etc. 
Emergency Repairs 
FREE ESTIMATES 
GUARANTEED WORK 
IN WRITING 

721-5517 697-1331 


AL’S ROOFING 

New Roofs 
Roof Repairs 
(I do my own work) 

563-2112 

941-3531 

FREE ESTIMATES 


Hoflariag 


PLASTERING 

DRY WALL 
GUARANTEED 
IMMEDIATE SERVICE 

William Duty 

PAl-2412 


MISTER 

ROOF 

LICENSED • INSURED 
WRITTEN 
GUARANTEE 

• SHINGLES 

• TEAR-OFFS 

• ONE PLY 

• METAL 

• RUBBER 

• HOT TAR 

DfV. OF GREAVES 
INC. BUftJTERS 

«99-6555 


profrSMonai lyptfig 


IVonder IVriter 

Professional Resume 
Word Processing 
& Writing Services 
Economical Rates 

15J Main St. Suite 1 

Belleville 697-8600 


Tro# Sfivke 


POWERS 
TREE SERVICE 

Trimming - Removal 
Stumps. Hedges St 
Clean Up 

Insured 

Free Estimates 
425-7617 


JESSE’S TREE 
SERVICE 

• Trimming 

• Removal 

• Stump Removal 

33 YEARS EXPERIENCE 
FREE ESTIMATES 
595-6407 722-302 

(evenings) 


WoH Washing 


HANDYMAN . 

t 

Wall and window cleaning, rugs 
and floor cleaning. Painting and 
all types of home repair, alumi¬ 
num cleaning and roof repair. 

471-26P« 835-8610 


Woltrpioofing 


LEAKY BASEMENT? ^ 
Mr. B’s * 
Basement I 
Waterproofing 

Licensed. Guaranteed. ^ 
FHA Approved Methods. ’ 
Free E.stimates 

753-9226 928-0450 


METRO BASEMENT 
WATERPROOFING, 
INC. 

Work guaranteed in writ¬ 
ing. Free Estimates 
Metro Waterproofing will 
beat any written estimate 
459-1699 


TO OUR 
READERS: 

If you feel there is mis¬ 
leading or unethical 
advertising in the Ser¬ 
vice Guide, please call 
legitimate concerns to 
our attention, and we’ll 
try to assist you. If you 
are not satisfied with 
work done by any Ser¬ 
vice Guide advertiser, 
the Better Business 
Bureau may be able to 
help you. 
































































































































































































Page 8-B 


Associated Newspapers, inc. 


iviay u, i»o/ 


LAUNDRY MAT allendant Ma- 
lure person, retirees welcome. 
Call 721-0:1.50. 

— RELIABLE 

EXPERIENCED 

WAITRESS 

needed. Day shifl. good lips. Must 
apply within. Canton Cafe. 42(KJ0 
[) Michigan Avc.. Canton. No phone 

calls pica.sc. 

GAS STATION. Now sel(-,scrve 
needs exp. help to run con.solo. 
29240 Ecorse Rd.. Romulus 
(Ecorse St Middlcbcll). 721-8958 

!”( PAINTERS HELPER wanted. 
iQ. must have transportation. Send 
rn- reply to: Painter. P.O. Box .578, 
Dept. C. Wayne. Ml 481H4. 

OFFICE CLERK 

‘‘ Part-time for Romulus apartment 
^ complex, call 8am - 5pm only. 595- 
461.5. 

★ATTENTION* 

Sharp, ambitious women 
needed to hire and train demon- 
slrators for Christmas Around the 
World. 

WEEKLY PAYCHECK. 
TRIPS. FREE TRAINING. NO 
im'ESTM ENT. CALL 477-2520.' 

„ MEDICAL 

d RECEPTIONIST 

11 needed, full time for new Oncology 
practice in Wayne/WesUand area, 
experience in billing, typing, 
dictation, medical spelling, nons- 
moker. 697-0889. 

DALY 

* DRIVE-IN 

Mature waitress wanted. 

722-4288 

i SALES/MANAGEMENT 

n Arc you looking for a sales position 

h that offers challenge and oppor- 
r- lunily and high income wdlh cxcel- 
i- lent training and a friendly work 
c environment? Well, why not work 
for Michigan’s largest growing re¬ 
tail chain and share our wealth? 
We offer paid training, bonuses & 
mcdical/dcntal insurance. All 
YOU need is two years sales ex¬ 
perience. For an interview today, 
call 427-9190. 

^ Clerical $7-9/Hr. 

WILL TRAIN CALL NOW 

.557-1200 

^ Job Network Inc 

MAINTENANCE 

PERSON 

experienced in plumbing for 
Romulus apartment complex, re¬ 
tiree ok. 595-4615. 

DIRECT CARE 
^ WORKERS 

• (or Romulus home for hearing im- 
*■ paired, opening in June. P.M. and 
midnight shifts. Full and part lime 
® openings. Must be at least 18. have 
^ sign language training or experi¬ 
ence and a good driving record, 
c CaU 661-5474 or 4296076. 

DRIVEWAY SALESPERSON 
)- with tow truck experience. Apply 
in person, 35520 Van Bom Rd.. 
Wayne. 

IMMEDIATE 
^ OPENINGS 

Data entry operator for busy 
warehouse office. Flexible hours, 
shipping and receiving experience 
helpful. 728-7100. 

Driver $11.50/Hr. 

NO EXPERIENCE CALL NOW 
557-1200 

j Job Network Inc. 

LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE 
worker. FuU time. Energetic & de¬ 
pendable. 753-9500. 

BABYSITTER. RELIABLE, 

P Taylor area, own transportation, 

, 941-1899 or 595-0067 

- CASHIER NEEDED afternoon 
shifl. must apply in person be¬ 
tween 10 A.M. and 3 P.M. Mon. - 
Fri.. Airline Parking Inc.. 8325 
Merriman. Romulus, 48174. 

AUTO MECHANIC 

FuU time. Superior Auto Sc Truck 
Service. 307 Davis. BcUeviUe. 697- 
5811. apply in person. 

BABYSITTER NEEDED. slaiT- 
ing June 1. mature adult or teena¬ 
ger. Cherry HiU - Venoy area, my 
home or yours, 721-5068. 

CLEANING $350 WKLY 

NO EXPERIENCE 

NOW HIRING. INC. 543 7800 

ATTENTION 

Our new rapidly growing firm has 
many fuU lime openings, no ex¬ 
perience necessary, company 
training. $250 a week guaranteed, 
call Wednesday 10-6 pm St Thurs¬ 
day 192 pm only. 595-6629. ' 

WANTED MATURE dependable 
prep cook. 981-6877. 

Light Factory Work | 

5555 TreadweU, Wayne j 

ABSOLUTELY. THE best home 
parly plan opportunity!!! Under- j 
coverWear’s tasteful ladle’s ling- 
crie. Earn $$$. trips, gems and 
furs!!! 397-0980. 

WAITRESS 1 

banquets and restaurant, full or l 
part lime. Apply; New Hawthorne l 
Valley. 7300 N. Mcrriman. West- 1 
land. ] 

Construction $13-15/Hr. ' 

NEED TO HIRE CALL ' 

557-1200 1 

Job Network Inc. * 

WANTED DIETARY aides, apply i 
at Livonia Nursing Center. 28910 1 

Plymouth Road. Livonia. 1 

MARKETING ^ 

$400-600 WKLY ENTRY LEVEL “ 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543-7800 ‘ 

' a 

MANAGEMENT 5 

POSITION » 

Opening in the fast paced businc.ss ^ 
of rent to own. people with renUil ^ 
or retail cxpieriencc. who enjoy ® 
working with people .should apply. 1 
the position requires working with c 
.sales, deliveries and collections. 1' 
exceUenl base pay with incentives 
and benefits. eaU today. 3,54-74*10 , 

or send resume to Michigan Rent ^ 
To Own. 21665 Telegraph. South- 
field. Ml 48634. ^ 


) MOVING SALE. 3'2‘25 Hubbard. 

II Woyne. North off Michigan Ave. 

May 14 St 15, t)-6 p.m. If raining. 

- May 28 St 29. 

'* HUGH YARD SALE, toys galore, 
misc. Starts 10 a.m. Thursday. 
May I4lh thru May 17th. 15410 
Prospect. Dearborn (back of K- 
L Mart at Michigan Avc. at Grecn- 
field). 

” GARAGE SALE, clothes, toys. 

. crafts, misc. May 14-15-16. 10 a.m. 

to 6 p.m. 439 E. Huron River Dr . 
BcUeviUe. 

[' MOVING SALE. misc.. 2 beds, 

’’ Kodak Carousel, books. Chairs. 

34525 Ash. Wayne. Thursday St 
- F'riday only 

MOVING SALE, furniture, hou.se- 
hold goods, clothing, misc.. Sat. St 
Sun.. 8am-5pm. 3959 Garfield. 
Wayne. 2 blocks S. of Michigan. 2 
blocks W. of Mcrriman. 

GARAGE SALE - 34566 Chestnut. 
Saturday. May 16. 95 pm., boys 
clothing, gas refrigerator, misc. 

YARD SALE. 4-family, May 11.15 
St 16. 9-6 pm. 9455 Biddle. 
Romulus. 

~ 61. Miscellaneous Items 

- SANYO CAR equalizer, never 
been used. $100. please call after 
.5pm. 72I-7I64. 

SHREDDED PAPER 
$1.00 BAG 

CALL 729-4000 

EXT. 263 

ELEC. 30” STOVE, scif-cican; 
yellow; like new; best offer. 359 
9166 

TWO FULL size box spring St mal- 
^ tresses. $110 per .set. One queen 
set. $180 new. 562-4373. 

OVAL DINING room tabic with 
r four high back chairs, walnul. 

J, $125.3299351. 

r FOR SALE, sofa bed. dressers, 
room divider and more. CaU after 

6 p.m. 94I-33I8. 

'• FOR SALE. ‘24 ft round Doughboy 
pool with filler $400. .595-1135 after 

0 4 p.m 

r DARK PINE, king size waterbed. 

^ 3drawcrsoncachsidc. velvet blue 
patchwork comforter, good condi 
lion. $800. 728-1424 after 5 pm 

BLACKSMITH ANVIL made in 
g England 1858. nice ring, $09 .50. 
call 422^918 

0 HOSPITAL BED Manual Excel 
i lent condition. $180 or best offer. 
For information, call 278-6841. 

1973 NOVA. $175. console stereo 
* $50. 25 in color TV $100. all work 

^ good but must go. 6991274 

- EIGHT HORSEPOWER Simplic 
ity riding lawn mower. $100. 277- 
1 H6H4 

„ KENMORE WASHER Sc dryer 
good condition, will scU separate, 
call 7296746 

SPIEGEL ROTXJTILLER. cotton 
candy machine Sc stand. /Vito Sax. 
Trumpet, Banjo. 12 string guitar, 
e Violin. Trombone with extra 
valve, music mixer. Rugel horn, 
r Baritone Sax. Organ. Solovox. 942- 
0792. 

0 TOY BOXERS, colorful, extra large 
and safe for your child. $50. 699 
2089 

^ STOVE & REFRIGERATOR, ex 
celicnt condition. $225 for both, 
will .separate. 565-2942. 

FULLY EQUIPPED hospital 

J bed, motorized adjustment. $525. 

CaU Joan Dyer at T294000or after 
> 6 p m . Joe at 4S5-3S42. 

MOVING-MUST sell. 16 cu ft 
chest type freezer. $120. large 

* glass top dinette table with 6 

• chairs. $75; king-size 5 piece, all 
r wood bedroom sel. $250. 326-6776. 

J CLASSIC. UNIQUE, one of a kind 
, chair made from a Cyprus Irco 
‘ stump. di.splaycd for years at the 
former Big Daddy’s I>pn in Saline. 
4294475. 


32. Help Wanted 


Cashiers - Stock 
HELP WANTED 
All Shifts 

Starting $:t7r> to $-1.oo hr. 
AF'PLY NOW y\T 
£VEN ELEVEN - WAYNE 1 
AT 

AVONDALE. WESTLAND 


IMPOSSIBLE 


MI ‘Wl.'il. Attention Personnel. 


RN 


Avo. & Annapolis. E.O.E. 


721-0735 or 722-17X>. 


NURSE AIDES 


lis. E.O.E. 


CAREER 

OPPORTUNITY 


MI 48111 or call 697-5903. 


CANTON 
AREA 
Blue Jean Jobs 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
Come with a friend and woi 
topelhcr. Earn and learn. Call 
Temporary Specialists 
NO FEE : 


THE ASSOCIATION 
FOR RETARDED 
CITIZENS 
WESTERN WAYNE 


9100 to arrange for an interview 


in person. A2Z Rentals. 1007 S 
Wayne Rd.. Westland. 


SORTERS AND NAILERS 
Romulus. Full time. $4.00 an hour. 


outdoor work. 559-7744. 


ducts, etc. Good income. No ex- 


ext. 735 


LIGHT 

INDUSTRIAL 


term assignments. Above aver¬ 
age wage. 

565-8060 

AIDA PERSONNEL 
SERVICES 


HAIRSTYLIST & 
NAIL TECHNICIAN 

Wanted for Salon in Wayne area 
Experience preferred. Call 729 
7010. 


Manager Trainee 

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs 


40 ambitious people immediately. 
Various positions open from 
ground floor to upper manage¬ 
ment. no exp. necessary. If you 
would like to make $7-10 an hour 
while in training, call now for im¬ 
mediate appointment. First come, 
first served. 261-1511. ask for Mr. 
Green. 


RECEPTIONIST 

With Wang experience. Long 
term. Livonia area. Myriad Hu¬ 
man Resources. 827^13. 


NURSE 

needed for new Oncology practice 
in Wayne/Westland area, experi¬ 
ence in IV’s and all forms of Che¬ 
motherapy. nonsmoker. 697-0889. 


Bonanza Family 
Restaurant 

now hiring for all positions. Apply 
between 2-4. Mon-Thurs. 34435 
Michigan Avc. Wayne. 


DREAM JOB! Showing designer 
jewelry, no investment, ab.solute- 
ly no collecting or delivering, call 
Jan 728-2560. 


PART TIME 
FULL TIME 

two positions available, flexible 
hours, excellent training prog¬ 
ram. For information, call Mrs. 
Davis. .326-1166. 


HELP WANTED. Wash Tub 
Laundry Mat, .37500 Huron River 
Drive. Romulus, part time. 941 
7033. 


DELIVERY PERSON. Retiree 
preferred. Must have good geog¬ 
raphical knowledge of Wayne. 
Westland, and surrounding com¬ 
munities. Apply in person. Keller 
& Stein Florist. 42158 Michigan 
Avc.. Canton. 


BINGO 


MONDAY SATURDAY 


American Leg. Aux. 

11 :30 a.m. 

11800 Michael. Taylor 
(Telegraph-Brest R(d.) 
946-8399 


AM. LEGION 
POST 200 

630 P.M. 

11600 Mchael. Taylor 
946-6399 

TUESDAY 


Wayne Memorial 



Football Boosters 


American Legion 

630 p.m. 


Post 111 

K of C. HaJI 


Bingo 6 p.m. 

35100 Van Bom, Wayne 


4422 S Wayne Rd . Wayno 

722-7274 




WRECKER DRIVER wanted 
experience preferred, light and 
heavy duty equipment, apply 
2f);i:i.3 Hildebrandt. Romulus, Oam 
- .5pm. 


Factory $10-14/Hr. 

BENEFITS CALL NOW 

.5,57-1200 

Job Network Inc. 


STUDENTS 

We have immediate openings for 
temporary light industrial and 
clerical assignments located in 
Plymouth. Livonia St Farmington 
Hills, must be 18 and have reliable 
transportation and phone, call 
now for appointment. 

STAFF BUILDERS 

Temporary Personnel 
42541367 


ARC WELDER 

Light Gauge Metal 

for hollow metal shop. Must lay 
out ow'n w'ork, use of radial arm 
saw and hand tools required. 
Wages based on experience. Be¬ 
nefits available. Call Tom at 397- 
1940 between 3-5 pm. 


ACCOUNT CLERK 

part time, college courses or de¬ 
gree with computer experience. 
$8..57-9.54 hourly. Contact Mrs. 
Gray. Wayne O I Library 
Federation. ;13030 Van Bom Rd 
Wayne. 


WELDERS 
FULLTIME CALL TODAY 
NOW HIRING, INC. .543-7800 


BURGER KING 

Newest location in Western 
Wayne Co. now hiring for day shift 
($3.75/hr> and late night shift 
($4.00/hri. Apply 11550 Belleville 
Rd. before 11 a.m. or after 2 p.m 


BUSY WAYNE Dental office 
needs chairside assistant. Totally 
familiar with four-handed dentis 
try. Good pay and benefits. Call 
btw. 12-2 daily. 721-7624. 


Experienced 
Certified Mechanic 

full time. 728-5030 


SUMMER 
BLUE JEAN JOBS 

Assemblers, packers St ware 
house workers needed immediate¬ 
ly. Long and short term assign 
ments in the Canton and Livonia 
areas. Available now 

MGM 

OFFICE SERVICES 
474-7766 


ELECTRONICS 
$275-125 WKLY. WILL TRAIN 
NOW HIRING. INC. 543 7800 


BARTENDER 
BARMAID 

banquets and restaurant, full or 
part time Apply; New Hawthorne 
Valley. 7300 N. Mcrriman. West- 
land. 


FLIGHT ADMN. 
CLERK 

American Trans Air. the nations 
largest domestic St international 
Charier Airline with scheduled 
service, has a clerk/typist position 
available in our F/A Admn. De¬ 
partment at our DTW base. This 
detailed oriented position requires 
40/50 WPM typing skill, filing, 
photo copying and collating accur¬ 
ately in a high energy environ¬ 
ment. Candidate must have excel¬ 
lent communication skills, inven¬ 
tory knowledge and have the flex¬ 
ibility to work weekends. 

Phone inquiries will not be 
accepted. EOE/AA. Please send 
resume and salary history to; 

F/A Admn aerk-1750-DTW 
AMERICAN TRANS AIR 
P.O. Box 51609 
Indianapolis. Ind. 46251 


FACTORY JOBS 
$7-15 HRLY. WILL TRAIN 
NOW HIRING. INC. .543-7800 


RN or LPN 

to work three days a week on our 
afternoon shift. Job involves su¬ 
pervision. passing medications 
and assisting with patient care on 
our 38 bed wing Phone 971-1433. 
M F. 9 a.m. to4:30p.m Whitehall 
Convalescent Home. 3370 Morgan 
Road. Ann Arbor. 


EXPERIENCED MEDICAL re¬ 
ceptionist needed. Contact Belle¬ 
ville Fool Center at Belleville 
Square or by phone. 699-3668. 


PIZZA HUT 

is now accepting applications for 
all positions, full or part time. 
Must be dependable, hard w-ork- 


Rd.. Belleville. 


AUTO WORKERS 
HRLY WILL TRAIN 
HIRING, INC. 543-7800 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 
We are seeking men and women of 


BANK TELLERS 

RLY. WILL TRAIN 

NOW HIRING. INC .543-7800 


after .5pm. 


able rates, references. 326-0509. 


40. Business Opportunity 


EXT 2403. 


MI. very reasonable. 5)41-1616 
697-8522. 


45. Music Lessons 


QUALIFIED TEACHERS 
ano. Organ. Keyboard, Violi 
Guitar. Voice 
NOW AVAILABLE 
BAND INSTRUMENT 
LESSONS 

KEYBOARD 
WORLD 
Call 729-2220 
ALSO PIANO TUNING 


35. Situations Wanted 


RANDY’S LIGHT HAULING. 
One ton stake truck. We dq tree 
trimming, grass cutting, yard 
cleaning, call kinds of general 
work. 941-2349. 


HAIRCARE FOR 
THE HOMEBOUND 

Haircut. Set. Permanent, Tint, 
Manicure, Pedicure. Eyebrow 
Arch. Carol. 721-4759. 


T-N-T. INC. total security for par¬ 
ties. weddings any special occa- 
sion. Call 722-0405. Mr. Melvin. 


G & S ODD JOBS 

Reasonable Rates • Tree Trim¬ 
ming • Painting • Lawn Care. 313- 
595-7085, Ask For Gene, 7am - 
8pm. 


LIGHT HOUSECLEANING. 
Wayne/Westland. Monday, 
Wedne.sday, Saturday afternoons, 
3-4 hours, $20, honest, dependable, 
reference available. Sharon 722- 
3638. Mon.-Wed., 12:30-7:30 p.m.- 
Fri.. before 11 am or after 4:30 
pm-anytime Sat. 


50. Pets^Supplies 


GROOMING 

POODLE 
SCHNAUZER & 
MOST BREEDS 
722-1081 


PEKINGESE 
STUD SERVICE 


Stock. 


722-4063 


females. 47‘l-5762. 


Call 7294)080 after 5 p.m. 


1854 after 5:30. 


57. Antiques 


miles May 16-17. (313)429-9303 


Antiques 

BEFORE THE TURN 
OF THE CENTURY 

• Oak Cylinder Top Desk 38 ’ Wi 
42” High. $450 

• Oak Dresser St Bcvillcd Mur 
42” Wide. - has matching $350 


Wide. $275 


aU for $1,000. CaU 728^)829 


59. Auctions 


planning a public auction May 16. 
1987 at 10 a m. in the area of the 
Department of Public Serv ice gar 
age located at 37095 Marquette 


ment, misc. tools and misc. items. 


Stor-N-Lock Storage Co . 300 lots 
of unclaimed furniture, ap 
plianccs and misc. will be sold at 
our salesroom. 32536 Michigan 
Ave.. Wayne. Sat . May 16. at 7 00 
pm. Inspection; 9:30 am. day of 
sale until sale lime. J. Wofford. 
Auctioneer. 721-1939. 


AUCTION - SUNDAY. May 17. 
11:15 am. 3 mi. N. of Saline. 2'/4 mi 
W. on Textile Rd. Antique buggy 
with brass hubcaps and silver 
trim. Cutler sleigh, both with fills 
(nice), player piano and 60 rolls, 
farm equipment. WD Allis Chal 
mers and related equipment, 
household-including Grinnell 
Spinet piano. Scars 12 HP mower, 
western saddles and lack, many 
more items. A1 St Luella Keeney 
owners. Terms: Cash. Halchishak 
Auction Service. 31:M28-7867 


60. Miscellaneous Sales 


THREE FAMILY yard .sale 4028 
Edmund, comer of Myrtle. West 
of Howe, North of Annapolis. Fri. 
Sc Sat. 9-7. Sunday I04>. 


BASEMENT SALE miscel¬ 
laneous items. 1-9 pm. call 397- 
K328. 


COLOSSAL 

Rummage Sale at St. Paul United 
Church of Christ. 24136 Goddard. 
Taylor. Just West of Telegraph. 
Wed., May 20. 9-8 p.m. Sc Thurs., 
May 21. 9-5 p.m. Everything im¬ 
aginable. 


BLOCK SALE 
Wayne Road and California. May 
I5th. 16th. 17lh - 2 camper trailers. 
40 ft. ladder truck. 40 ft. hydraulic 
boom truck. 14 ft. Van Truck, 
Chevy grain farm truck, 2 utility 
trailers, lots of miscellaneous 
furniture. Hutch and chairs, kitch¬ 
en outfit, humidifier, antique 
grandfather clock, couch and 
chairs with end table and a lot 
more!!! 800 gallon 3 section ferti¬ 
lizer. 300 gallon underground gas 
tank, 90,000 BTU hanging furnace, 
wood stove with fan and pipe, 1976 
Dodge dump truck, air compress¬ 
or heads. Jeep frame and running 
gear. 


GARAGE SALE. Lots of Misc. 
items. 2140 Alberta. Westland 
Venoy-Palmer area. Fri.. Sat.. 
Sun. 9-9 


GARAGE SALE - 1286 Selma, 
Westland (North of Palmer) Re¬ 
frigerator. hou.sehold. tools, toys, 
games.' books, clothing, misc. 
May 14. 15. 16 9-5 pm. 


SUPER BLOCK SALE - May 1,5- 
17. California Sc Wayne Rds. (be¬ 
tween Pennsylvania Sc Eureka in 
Romulus), glass, tools, furniture, 
antiques, clothes & mi.se Much, 
much more. 


GARAGE SALE. New Sc used arti¬ 
cles. 35725 Ronald, Romulus (I bik 
off Wayne Rd. Sc Wick) Wed., 
Thurs.. Fri.. Sat. 11-6 p.m. 


BIG YARD SALE May 23rd and 
2^nh, Sam - ?. Traclor-Ford-9 end. 
plows, discs, snow blade. 1979 Dal- 
sun pickup with new cap. dump 
truck, rolotillers. and all kinds of 
other misc. items. 22000 Haggerty 
Road. Belleville. 

GARAGE SALE. May 14. 15 & 16. 
9-4pm, water beds, snowmobile, 
baby items, etc., 485 Sunningdalc, 
Inkster. 

SUNFLOWER SUB Garage Sale. 
May 14-16,9 am til ? W. of Canton 
Center Rd,, N. and S. of Warren 
Rd., watch for yellow balloons. 

YARD SALE - 35140 Melton. West- 
land, Fri . Sat., May 15.16.9-6, lots 
of furniture, 2 sewing machines, 
bikes, misc. 


QUEEN BEDROOM ouHit includ 
Ing nighlstand. beautiful condi¬ 
tion. like new, $700; several other 
items also for sale. 722-1326. 


64. Lawn & Garden Supplies 


TWO ROTOTILLERS. HHP. $425 
Sc $8.5. 942-1716. 


65. Farm Equip.Supplies 


JOHN DEERE3 point hitch Bu.sh 
Hog. $350, manure spreader. $300. 
B & N Farmnll. very good cond . 
asking $1,000. 1953 Golden Jubilee 
Ford, like new. $3,500. call after 
6pm. 911-7908 


68. Garden Produce 


SAYRE’S RED 
BARN MARKET 
OPEN 

Top quality flower and vegetable 
plants, hanging haskel.s. bulk 
.seeds, also Southern vegetable 
varieties. On Ecorsc Rd. htw. 
Haggerty and Belleville Rd 
Hours 9-8 Mon-Fri.. H-6 Sal Sc Sun. 
Call .397-2763. 


72. Machinery & Tools 


CROWN ELECTRIC, hydraulic 
fork lift. $400. 277-8684. 


73. Musical Merchandise 


UPRIGHT PIANO 
Excellent Condition 
‘ $750 
461-1375 


BRIGHTER 

FUTURES 

Can bo found by following up on 
the opportunities listed in today’s 
Help Wanted section. Don’t miss 
out! 


75. Boats/Accessories 


17FT. ALUMINUM 40 HP John¬ 
son Elec. Start-Trailer. $600. Cu.s- 
lom built 4 X K utility trailer, Exc. 
Cond.. $.350. 729-31(V1 before 3 p.m. 
721-0164 after. 


1978 CUSTOMCRAFT JET. 19 ft. 
mctalflake hull. 460 Ford engine 
with Berkley pump, low hours, 
exc. cond., Roadrunner custom 
trailer $6800. 981-1474. 


BOAT Sc TRAILER. 19 ft . $1,200. 
912-1716 


77. Recreational Vehicles 


1978 STARCRAFT POP-UP cam 
per. sleeps H. good condition. 
$1,500. 7K2-9173. 


$$ CHALLENGE $$ 

You Can’l Find A Belter Deal 
Or Quality Selection Of 

• New Motor Homes 

• • Rock wood A A C 

• * Frontier A & C 

• Micro Mini Homes 
** Sunland Express 

• • Sun Rader 
Trailers by Reelwood 

• Prowler 

• Regal 

• Lynx (New Basement models) 
Al.so Viking Folding Tent Cam¬ 
pers 

H. W. MOTOR HOMES 

9HI-I535 or 397-0101 
9 111 6 - Mon-Sal Canton 


TRAVEL TRAILER. 16 ft . $62.5. 
728-5861 


CAMPER. SELF' contained, 
sleeps 6. nice. $1,400. 912 1716 


82. Wanted to Buy 


WANTED ORGAN or piano play¬ 
er for Wayne Christian Center. 
For more information call 728- 
1709 


87. Rooms for Rent 


PUBLISHER'S 
NOTICE 

All real estate advertised in this 
newspaper is subject to the Feder- 
al Fair Housing Act of 1968. which 
makes it illegal to advertise any 
preference, limitation or discri¬ 
mination based on race, color, re¬ 
ligion. sex. or national origin, or on i 
intention to make any such prefer 
once, limitation, or discrimina 
lion This ncwspapior wiU not kno¬ 
wingly accept any advertising for 
real estate which is in violation of 
the law Our readers are hereby 
informed that all dwellings adver- 
ti.scd in thl.s newspaper are avail¬ 
able on an equal opportunity 
basis 


ROOM BY THE month. aU utili¬ 
ties paid, house privileges, work 
ing person preferred. 721-8656 


90. Duplexes for Rent 


NORWA\TME DUPLEX.2br $325 
per month. $325 sec dep Immedi¬ 
ate occupancy. ‘TiH 2835. 


NORWAYNE. 2 BR. fenced yarxi. 
carpeted, freshly painted, no pets, 
$325 plus secunly. T28-H308 


WESTLAND (MERRIMAN 
Palmen. Attractive 3 br. duplex, 
unfurnished, exc. cond $425 
monthly. Call 4-8 p m. 274-6202 


91. Apartments for Rent 


67. Garden Plants & Supplies 


“PETUNIA LAND” 

IS OPEN! 

25 varieties of petunias, all other 
annual flower Sc vegetable plants. 

ROBSON 

GREENHOUSES 

9015 Haggerty. Belleville)IVi mile 
N of I-91. I mile S. of Ecorse) 
6993399 :t97-‘2252 


WAYNE 

1 and 2 Bedroom Apts 
Plus Efficiency 
Apts Available 

728-0699 729-3321 


$170 PER MONTH 

• Welfare w'clcomc 

• Furnished available 

• Motel type efficiency 

f $170 Deposit 
Week or Month 

595-6972 697-7995 


Parkwood Manor / 

1-2-3 Bedroom Townhouses 

RENT STARTS AT *277 

Children Welcome 

^ Appliances ★ Carpet ★ Patio 
* Air Cond. * Swimming Pool 
★ Laundry Facilitjes ♦ Club Room 


Office Hours: 

Mon . Wed , Fri . 10 a m - .S p m Equal 
Tucji & Thur:i 10 a m 7pm Housing 
Sat 9a m I pm Opportunity 


8800 Parkwood Dr. 
Belleville 

699-2083 


MORGAN 
MANOR 
APARTMENTS 

1-94 & Wayne Road 


•ir 




i i 


i 

? 

• 


1 

1 ' 


1 

■ l \ 

\ iii 

!■ '* 





Applications being taken for 
seveial apartments, included 
in rent: heat, hot water, Olym¬ 
pic swimming pool, HBO, 2 
tennis courts. 

$404-445 for 2 bedroom 
apartments 

$360-380 for 1 bedroom 
apartments 

941 -7070 


AIRPORT AREA 

2 BDRMS. 

Appliances, DincUc. carpeting 
(lOVf Senior’s Discount) 

$3.50 Monthly 

VAN REKEN 
941-0790 588-4700 


WESTLAND 
Walk to Hudsons 

6813 Wayne Rd. Beautiful one and 
two bedrooms. Newly decorated, 
parking, air. pool, heat included, 
cable available. Seniors welcome. 
No pcLs. F'rom $410 NO APPLICA¬ 
TION FEES. OPEN 7 DAYS. 

721-6468 


91a. Condos & Townhouses for 
Rent _ 

WESTWICK 

SQUARE 

TOWNHOUSES 

2 & 3 bedrooms. Wayne-Wcslland 
.schools, appliances, gas. water St 
maintenance furnished, enjoy 
family co-op living. low monthly 
rates, yearly lax breaks and full 
basement, call Monday-Friday 
Oam - r)pm. .595-3444 

EQUAL HOUSING 
OPPORTUNITY 


RENT THIS 2 br Kids & pets 
okay. Good location. $450 .'P<2-447() 


$70. PER wf:ek 
U nfurnished 1 bedroom apart¬ 
ment. Call 5954J972. 


SPACIOUS TWO BEDROOM 
apartments, no deposit required. 
Includes heal, water, elegant club 
house and 24 hour maintenance. 
Conveniently located near Metro 
Airport St 1-91. 6992040. 


NORWAYNE. 1 BR. .stove, fridge, 
couple/baby welcome. $250 
monthly plus .security. 721-6009. 


INKSTER. NEAR Harrison St 
Michigan. 2 br.. newly dec. Safe, 
quiet area. $340.sec., $340 rent. 56.5- 
2912 


BUDGET VACANCIES, two and 
three bedrooms, good areas, low 
security deposits, childrcn-pots 
welcome. 548-1300. 


BELLEVILLE. 1 BR with fire¬ 
place on lake In 3-unil complex. 
$4.38 a month. No pets. .3496759 


INKSTER 

2 br apt., imm. occup . $2.50 plus 
deposit. S. of Michigan Avc. CaU 
4?1-5061. 


1 MONTH FREE RENT 

1 hr. $380 per month 

2 br. $430 p>cr month 
$500 required for movc-in 

Includes heat St water. No pets. 
Shown by appointment 
CaU 6-11-7707 

VAN HOWE APTS. 
5640 Howe Rd. 
Wayne 


FARMINGTON HILLS SUB¬ 
LEASE. 2 BR. 2 balhs. tennis 
courts, pool St covered carport. U>- 
catedat Greenhill Apartment, call 
47631111 


WESTLAND 

1 BR. newly decorated, carpeted 
appliances, air. heal. $34«. 9am 
7pm. 7295654 


WOODBURY GREEN. 2HK. 1'^.' 
baths, air. pool, appliances, in¬ 
cludes heat. 911-3196. 


92. Business Places (or Rent 


OFFICE SPACE 
FOR RENT 

Wayne Rd in Westland, ju.st South 
of I*almcr. 722-05.50. ask for Jon. 


NOW LEASING. TWO modern 
suites. Contact Kim Matthews at 
Associated Newspapers. 72!)-400(). 
shown by appt. 


FULLY EQUIPPED 
FAMILY STYLE 
RESTAURANT 

Seating for 125. no liquor, rca.son- 
ablc rent, good terms on purcha.se 
of equipment 3612 E. Michigan 
Ave.. Wayne, near Ford Plant 

647-7171 

COMMERCIALBUILDING 1809 
24(X)sq. ft. office building. Ideal for 
Doctor.-Dentist. Chiropractor Lo¬ 
cated across from Hospital. 
Mcrriman St Palmer. Westland 
Contact Greg. 729-4324_ 

92a. Banquet Halls for Rent 

AMVETS 

MEMORIAL HALL 
Available 
Westland 

ALL FACILITIES 
721-9440 

Catering Available 

93. Farms & Land for Rent 


THREE BEDROOM HOUSE. 
Stanford St.. Inkster. $356/mo . 
$706 moves you in. Immediate 
occupancy. 461-2223. 


AFFORDABLE. 2 BR for work¬ 
ing folks. Kids St pcLs okay. $375 
a?-4470 




98. Mobile Home Lots 
for Rent 


ECORSE ROAD near 275.28acres 
of land for rent. CaU LO .3-1938 


95. Houses for Rent 


WOODBURY GREEN 
BELLEVILLE 

Near 1-275 and 1-91 interchange 2 
br condo., 1*/^ baths, newly deco- | 
rated. Includes appliances, cen 
Iral air. pool with clubhouse. $t50 
monthly, includes heal' CaU F!arl 
Keim Really. 7292.500 


SHARP 3 BR. ranch in lovely 
neighborhood. Basement, fenced 
yard $;oo per month. 697-7101 or 
-128-9570 


ACT NOW 3 br . appliances, 
fenced yard, storage shed. $45i5 
:iK2-4470 


ONE BEDROOM, partially fur 
nished apartment in Sumpter 
Township. $75/wk plus security, 
421 2283 


BELLEVILLE. WALK To stores 
& church Two bedroom, exccUcnl 
condition, newly decorated Only 
mature couple need apply. No 
children or animals $425 includes 
all utilities. 697-8451 after 4 30 p.m. 


AVAIL^XBLE NOW 3 br . carpet, 
kids & peLs welcome. $4.50. .382- 
1470 


TWO /VND three bedrooms, good 
areas, low sccunty deposiLs, chil- 
drcn-pcLs welcome. .548-4300 


GET THIS 3 br . refrigerator Sc 
slave. Kids okay $325. 382-4-170 


WONT LAST. 3 br.. appUanccs. 
basement, garage, fenced yard. 
$160 382-4470. _ 

INKSTER.3 BR . Carpeted.$275a 
month $275 security. 326-8300. 


TRUCK TERMINAL WANTED 

Michigan-based company is looking for a truck¬ 
ing facility to lease or buy to accommodate growth. 

Facility must have 1500-2000 sq. ft. of office 
space. 1 acre of land, zoned industrial to allow truck 
parking and access to major highways (1-75,1-275, 
1-^). 

Terminal should be located in areas of Romulus, 
Wayne or Dearborn. 

We will share space with area mills and proride 
transportation services if requested. Immediate 
occupancy required. 

Call 846-7010 or 582-6996, ask for Terminal Man¬ 
ager. 


s l’.\ ( I <> I S A 1’ \ K IM 1 N 1 II «> \t I 



Experience lux¬ 
ury apartment liv¬ 
ing at its finest. 
Tastefully designed, 
conveniently located, 
securely protected 
...this is Fountain 
Park Westland. You’Ll 
be proud to call it 
your home. 

• Choice of spacious 1 
or 2 bedrt^m apart¬ 
ments with one or two 
baths • Washer & dryer 
in each apartment 

• Private entrance 
to each apartment 

• Kitchen complete 
with energy efficient 

Rentals from ^480 


R T M E 
\ f/ed/anJ/ 



GE appliances; 
; self-cleaning oven. 
14 cubic foot self¬ 
defrosting refngerator. 
dishwasher, garbage 
disposal and micro- 
wave oven • Insulated 
steel entry door with 
dead bolt security lock 

• Sound conditioned 
floors & walls • Private 
patios & balconies 

• Swimming pool 

• Tennis courts 




TELEPHONE: 
459-1711 

Fountain Park Circle 
Westland. MI 48185 

Open Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.in.-6:30 p.m.; 
Sat.-Sun. 12 noon-5 pjn. 


COACHMANS 

COVE 

Beautiful Mobile 
Home community 
right on Big Portage 
Lake. 

• Concrete street 
• Nat. gas 

• Regular & Double wide 
lots 3 miles N. of 1-94, 15 
minutes W. of Ann Arbor. 
$155/mo. 

517-596-2936 

ASK ABOUT 
OUR INCENTIVE 


INDIAN VILLAGE 
Mobile Home 
Community 

Jackson Area. 

1-94 & US-127 
Modem park, lovely spa¬ 
cious clubhouse, large 
swimming pool, large 
single and double wide 
lots, paved-well lighted 
streets, off street parking 
from $135 monthly 
Ask about our incentives 
and special spring offer 
517-764-3608 


100. Wanted to Rent 


ROOM AND BOARD in family 
home needed for 17 year old cirl. 
Payment guaranteed by Girl- 
stown Foundation. Will pay $350/ 
mo. Call Lori Knott 697-7242. 


101. Storage 


INDOOR-OUTDOOR CARPORT 
Boats, motortiomes. etc. Fenced, 
lighted, air. From $IOr"Open 7 
days. 483-5632. 


104. Mobile HomesLots 


MOBILE HOMES 
FOR SALE 

Handyman specials to be moved 
out of park Would make great 
specials. Many Mobile Homes for 
sale that can slay on lof Term.s 
available upon acceptance of ap¬ 
plication for homes remaining m 
park- 

485-6700 


1968 CA.MBR1DGE 12 x 60. good 
condition, nice arcar*MUST 
SELL! U500 397-8842. 


1981 FAIR.MONT. 14 x 70. 3 BRs. 2 
full baths. 7 X 12 expander. “5 x 7 
shed, on double lot. asking $15,000. 
7293735,_ 

North Mobile Homes 

sharp. 24 x 60. $2,760 movt^you in 
Holiday West. More fine Homes in 
area. Buy. .<elJ. trade - new Sc used, 
financmg available. 6997386. 

DOUBLE WIDE mobile home. 
Belle Villa. Belleville..^151.5 
days or 697-27X1 evenings* • • 

DOUBLE WIDE on large kU. 3 
bedrooms. 2 baths, family room. 
BcUcvillc area $13.500. 697-8691. 

105* Houses for Sale 

LOVELY - 
COUNTRY RAl^H 

3 brs.. c.xlra large kitchen, wood 
.stove in living room, both and 
kitchen newly remodclocir ncwer 
above ground pool, roof only' a f<^w- 
wceks old. large country lot. 
$51,900. Owner will look at all 
offers 

BRIDGE REALTY INC. 
697-4599 ' 


YOU DON'T HAVE TO GO 
VERY FAR. . . 



TO GET AWAY FROM IT ALL! 

• Spftclout 1 A 2 bedroom apartments, 
each with a fireplace and balcony or 
patio 

• Privata athlatic club featuring year- 
round Indoor-outdoor pool, sauna, 
steam bath, whirlpool and axarclae 
room. 

• Stunning clubhousa with flraslda 
lour>ga and gams room. 

• Secluded setting amidst woods ar>d 
duck ponds. 

• Cable television. 

• SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNTS ON 
MOST UNITS 

U^olcceit li^o 

apartments & atlrletic club 

261 -8028 

Conventlently locatad off Wayrta road, batween Warran and Joy. 
near tha Waatland Shopping Mall. Rental Offica a(^ Model Open 
10 a.m.-0 p.m. Dally. 


ENGLISH TUTOR house in 
Wayne. 3 possible 4 bedrooms, 
fireplace, basement, garage and 
fenced back yard that backs up to 
the nver. Price $52,000. call 7.2- 
3996, _ 

SOUTH DEARBORN HEIGHTS. 

2 bdrm. starter or retiree.-Newly 
painted. Family room with door- 
wall to deck. Large yard.^1 car 
garage. $29,900 CaU realtor 274- 
8911. 

BEAtnriFUL 
COUNTRY RANCH 

On about 2.66 acres. 3 brs.rFlonda 
room, great room. 2 fireplaces, 
patio and a beautiful view..$69,900 

BRIDGE REALTY INC. 
697-4599 

GARDEN CITY 

Immediate occupancy. Clean 2 br. 
ranch with I*‘j car garage. Good 
starter or retirement. Home 
maintenance free. $36,900 

CAMELOT 

525-5600 

First Time Offered 

country atmosphere, mainte¬ 
nance free. 3BR ranch, family 
room with fireplace, extra large 
living room, finished basement, 
many extras, priced to .soU. ask for 
Julia Weber. :»«-2200 

GARDEN CITY 

Super clean, 3 br. ranch with base¬ 
ment. 2^/1 car garage, large lot. 
newer carpeting, excellent area, 
$62,900 

CAMELOT 

525-5600 

MONROE COUNTV’. Sacrcs. neat 
looking place. Four bedroom alu¬ 
minum sided farm house, base¬ 
ment, garage, bam. other farm 
I buildings, more land available. 
I 4820 Newburg. Caricton _ 

i WESTLAND 2 BR - Norwayne 
Sub., up to code, new wiring, new 
plumbing, good repair, large lot, 
. quiet, clean neighborhood. $23,900, 
no agents please! 7296603. _ 

'' WAYNE’S 

i BEST BUY 

TTwo slor>’ aluminum older home. 

3 brs.. natural woodwork, great 
neighborhood. large living room, 
formal dining room. 2W car gar¬ 
age, biisemenl. Needs some TLC. 
$44,900 

CENTURY 21 
COOK & ASSOC. 

326-2600 

WAYNE 

SPACIOUS 

3 br Colonial with family room, 
wooii burning slove. I*!; balhs. 
basement and attached garage. 
Possible FHA-VA terms. $49,900. 
Immediate occupancy. 

ASK FOR LIZ SLOVIK 

:t26-2600 6990332 

Century’ 21 Cook 

WAYNE/WESTLAND 

SCHOOLS 

2BR doU house with garage, ask 
(or Sharon Rushlow. 

GEORGETOWN 

REALTY 

697-1414 ^”5254)555 

































































































































































































































































































































May 


13. 1987 


Associated Newspapers, Inc. 


Page 9-B 


105. Houses for Sale 

"WVYNE-VVESTLAND 

SCHOOLS 

‘f b'^". aluminum raiuh with 2 on 
tra-bi-s. in bascmonl, A must lo 

EAULKEllM 
WILL CO-OP INC. 
274-;n41 

Ask for KiTU'slino 


rit259 Niagara, Wayne 

BK bungalow 2 full balhs. sky 
lif^hl. rcmodclod kilchon. full 
* basement, move in condilion. Call 
Danny Kca. Hc/Max Boaixlwalk. 
" .'a2-n7oo. 


long, lean ranch 

On aiwul .•> acres. 2 bi-s.. family 
room. IVj baths, solar panels, hot 
tub. extra canning kitchen. 2 car 
attavhed Karaite and 2nd detache<i 
^qraKC. Homo is in the proce.ss of 
beioK redecorated. 

bridge realty INC 

697-451)9 


TW0^TX)HY home, -t nxim apart- 
mbWCup. H room down, l.-U» acres, 
Clinton Schools. $73.iXHl. .S17-*l5tv 

-um. 


- STATELY 
NEIGHBORHOOD 

Elegant two story home on 
wooded Ravine in “Old Wayne”, 
now car KaraKe, formal dininK 
roonS. lante livinu room with fire 
phipe, 2 baths, basement. 3 brs 
fabulous view. $78,900 

: CENTURY 21 

^COOK& ASSOC. 

-.T" 326-2600 


FIVE BH • brick. 2 balhs. 2 ear 
Karape. low down payment. KHA 
or VA terms, vaeant. $;M».ikh). -IHS- 
H-KXl. Inkster. 


ATTENTION 
METRO AIRPORT 
EMPLOYEES 

affordable family home in nice 
area. 3 HR. bath and a 1/2. brick 
ranch with basement and KaraKe. 
$:W.!X)U. Century 21 • Ttxl Dobbins. 

IMMEDIATE 

OCCUPANCY 

Spacious tri-level rt'ady to move 
into. 3 bi*s.. country kitchen with 
newer cupboards, family rt>om. 
patio, nice lot. 2 car KaraKe. 
W.S.tHX) 

Earl Kcim Westland 
729-2500 


REPOSSESSED 
BANK MUST SELL 

$2(X)U moves in. $3^1.(KX), 3 br. brick 
ranch. Newly decorated, new 
carpeliiiK. basement. KaraKe. 
Middlebcit-Chcrry Hill area. 
Westland schools. Call for 
address. Century 21 ABC ‘12.S-3250 


OPEN HOUSE 

May 17 from 2 to .S p. m. Owner will 
pay FHA and VA i>oinls. Come 
visit the cutest house on the block. 
l.Yl-l.S Colbert. Romulus (cast of 
Merriman. off Eureka. .$39,900 
Ask for Sandra Ackron. 697-1949. 
Clem Professionals. 


106. Condos & Townhouses 
for Sale 


INKSTER 

2 br. starter with completely re- 
Viibybled kitchen, central air. 
alarm system. 2 car KaraKe. Some 
-appliances included. $22,500. 

EARL KEIM 

- WILL CO-OP INC. 

274-3141 

Ask for Ernestine 


LAND CONTRACT 
TERMS 

are available on this extra sharp 2 
br.. IP.! bath condo. Buy today, 
move tomorrow. Immediate occu 
pancy. Only $:M.500. Call today. 

CAMELOT 

525-5600 


BELLEVILLE LAKE condo on 
water. 2BR. rent or .sale. $495 a 
month. 595-7.5>5 or 728-3100. 


ATCHINSON FORD SALES ’ 

BELLEVILLE 

SPRING INTO A USED 
CAR BUY TODAY! 

* 3,995 
* 9,595 
* 5,595 
* 5,095 
* 0,995 
,* 4,995 
* 6,595 
* 9,295 


nnitUSTAIKlDR. 

Auto., PS. PB. Air, Clean one •••••( 

19641150 CONVERSION VAN 

8 cyi.. Auto.. PS, PB, Air ••••••••( 

19M MERCURY CAPRI 

3 Dr.. V-8. 5 Sp.•••••••••••••( 

1965110 4 DR. LOADED 

PSrPB. Air •••••••••••••••( 

(965 CHEVY CAPRICE ClASSK 

8-Pass. Wagon, Loaded •#•••••#( 

1964 LID 4 DR. 

Auto, PS. PB. Air 

1965 F-50 PICKUP 

6 Cyl., PS. PB, w/Box Cover •••••• i 

1965 COUNIRY SQUIRE STA. WAGON 

PS^ PB. Air, Many other options • • • • • 

:>r 9800 BELLEVILLE ROAD 

BELLEVILLE 697-9161 


MONDAY & THURSDAY TILL 9 PM 
SAT 10-2 


WOODBURY GREEN 
BELLEVILLE 

Near 1-275 and l-!)4 inlcrchanKc. 2 
hr. . Ibaths, newly deeorateil, In¬ 
cludes appliances, central air. 
pool with clubhou.se. $-1.50 monthly, 
includes heal! Call Earl Keim 
Really. 72tI-'25(X). 


109. Income Property 


EIGHT. 1 BR. apartments. Romu¬ 
lus. $10.(XX) down. .595-6972. 


198-1 Ma/da(r26, luxury. 4 door. air. 
AM-FM & cassette, crui.so. Great 
buy. .$6,995. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just Wc.sl of 1-275 

453-4600 


112. Acreage 


CORBEN 
REAL ESTATE 

Two 10 acre parcels. Van Buren 
Twp. City water and sewers. Only 
.$:i.500 an acre. L.C. terms. Corben. 
.562-8.5.50 or 557-1764. 


LINCOLN. MILAN. Dexter area. 
1 - 10 acre site. RollinK. wooded. 
secludtHl L/C Hayes Real Estate. 
•UH-17H9. 


VACANT LAND 

.54 acres. Only $2000 an acre with 
terms. On Napier between Ford 
and Cherry Hill. Call Metni Wesl. 

261-3434 


113. Real Estate Wanted 


CASH IN 
24 HOURS 

For your home or land 
contract 

Call Ron At: 
COOK & ASSOC. 
326-2600 


WE PAY CASH 

for hou.scs and land contracts. Ask 
for GcorKc 

Advance of Michigan 
425-0816 


1 WILL make up your back house 
payments and .save your credit. 
call Ken. 45.5-1816._ 

114. Auto Accessories_ 

REBUILT ENGINE. 231. V6 and 
parts. 261-1943._ 

115. Autos for Sale 

1985 Trans Am - full equipment. 
includinK t-tops!! $9.9a5. 
GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1984 Ponliac Ficro. red. S.E.. 
:iH.00O miles, automatic. $6,990. 
Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 

28:i-:moo 


198:1 Buick Century, air. AM-FM 
stereo, wire covers. $5,995. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just West of 1-275 

453-4600 


1985 Camaro Sport Coupe, alloy 
wheels, automatic, air & more!' 
$6,985. 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


198:1 Chevy Celebrity CL. loadctl. 6 
cylinder. Sharp. $'1.8*18. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just West of 1-275 

453-4600 

1984 Subaru 4 door, only 25.000 
miles. Shari) $4.4*14. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just Wc.sl of 1-275 

453-4600 


1987 Baratla Coupe. Factory offi¬ 
cial! ! Compare to new and save!! 
$10,975. 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1981 Chevy El Camino. nice.shai)e. 

priced to sell. .$*1.66.5. 

Dick Genlhc Chev. 
‘28:i-:i4oo 


I9a5 AMC Alliance L. 4 door. auto. 
AM-FM ic ca.sscllc. priced to sell. 
.$2,995. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

PIvmoulh Rd. just Wesl of 1-275 

453-4600 


1978 Olds Cutlass Supreme 
BrouKham. 1 owner. 52.0(X) miles. 
Loaded. $3.9‘K). 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 

' 28:1-3400 


1985 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. hur- 
Kundy. 2:1,000 miles. $1L!XX». 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 
t 28:i-:i400 


I{W2 CORVETTE. bouKht in 198.1. 

loaded. low mileaKc. stored win¬ 
ters. $14,800. call Bob or Curt 722- 
7788. 


1986 Chevy Cavalier. 2 lone, full 
equipment. $6,9.54 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1986 Chevy Sprint, automatic, air. 
only 17.0(X) miles!! $5.9,52. 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1985 Chevy Cavalier. 4 door. 14.000 
miles. Slick. $5,984. 

Dick Genlhc Chev. 
283-3400 


1980 Chevy Monza. 2 door hatch 
back. auto. air. Krcat value. $L ia5 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just West of 1-275 

453-4600 


1980 Lincoln Mark VL 4 door, 
loaded, excellent condition. $6,486 
Dick Genthc Chev. 
28:i-:i400 


1984 Grand Ponliac LE. loaded. 
42.000 miles. $7,993. 

Dick Genthe Chev. 
28.3-3400 


LAW AUTO 
SALES 

722-5200 

TRANSPORTATION 


80SUNB1RD 

$895 

76 GRANADA 

$595 

79 HORIZON 

.$695 

TRUCKS 


84 CHEVROLET S-10 

$-1995 

83 CHEVROLET C-IO 

$4995 

83 NISSAN 

$3995 


.12115 MICHIGAN 
OPEN SATURDAYS 


1984 Buick Riviera, loads of t‘quip- 
ment. and nice. $9,995 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1986 Olds Cutlass Supreme 
loaded, I owner. $9,989. 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 
283-3*100 



BiROTHERS 

fORD 

33300 Ford Rd 
Westlar 



^,295 


Salesman of the Month 

Bill Locke 


“1987” Mustang 

3,000 Miles. Sunroof, Pwr., Loaded. 

“1985” Mustang Convertible 

Like New. %all for details 

"1985” Toyota SR-5 4x4 

Red w/Vvagon wheels. 

“1984” Dodge 

3/4 ton pick-up. Royal SE. Loaded. 


* 7,995 

* 8,495 


Over 50 years of satisfied customers 

call 421-1300 


1986 Chevy Cavalier. 4 door, bur 
Rundy. I owner. 14.000 miles 
$7,992. 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 
28.3-3400 


1986 Buick Skylark, 4 door. I4.1XX) 
milc.s. like new. loaded. $8,‘Jfr.{. 

Dick Genthe Chev. 

28:i-:m(K) 

1985 Buick l‘ark Avenue, loadcrl. 
blue. 4 door. $10,900. 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 

28:1-3400 

1980 EAGLE, -klr. $950. call after 
6pm or Sunday.s. ‘M1-2W14. 

I*J85 Cadillac Sedan Deville Fleet- 
wood. .31.000 miles. 1 owner. 
$14.‘XX), ! 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 

28,3-3*100 

1986 Camaro Iroc-Z. auto, l-lops. 
loaded. $13,777. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. ju.st We.sl of 1-275 

453-4600 

1976 GRANADA, exccllenl run- 
ninR condilion. 4 brand new lircs. 
rusly but Iru.sly. .$.3(X)or best offer. 
72‘)-9(r28. 

1983 PONTIAC (XXX). 4 door, fully 
loaded. .36,000 miles, very clean. 
$.5905 or make offer. 722-7726. 

1985 Camaro Iroc-Z. loaded, in- 
cludinR [lower seals, only 18.0(X) 
miles. $11,777. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. just West of 1-275 
453-4600 

1985 CHEVY CAPRICE Classic, 
excellent condition, loaded. 305 en- 
Rinc. $7,000. 722-1019 

1982 COUGAR - full power, mini 
condition, private owner. $2,700. 
728-6272. 35812 W MichiRan. 
Wayne. 

1969 MUSTANG MACH I. $!X)0; 
1976 MustanR Cobra II. $400. 728- 
1.399. 

1978 CHEVY CHEVETTE. needs 
minor repair on enRinc. new bat¬ 
tery. now transmission. $750 or 
best offer. .59.5-45:19. 

1979 FIREBIRD Formula T-Top. 
Rood condition. $2500 or best offer. 
941-5920. 

1978 DATSUN 510. GOpD trans¬ 
portation. $400 or best offer. Call 
after 6 p.m. 941-5707 


Tremendous 

Savings 

on import & domc.slic 
cars 

IhrouRh our consultinR 

service 

Good News Auto Network 
Call Mr. Dixon now!! 

729-0290 


1987 Chevy S-10 pickup. 5.000 

miles. 1 owner, stick, brown. 
$7,992. 

Dick Genthc Chev. 
283-:M<X) 


I9H2 MUSTANG - l-tops. 4 cyl.. 
Rood condition. 4 speed, am/fm 
cas.scttc. $2.6a5. 729-.3240. 

1986 PONTIAC 
GRAND-AM 

P.S.. P.B . Tilt. Cruise. Air. Sun¬ 
roof. 24.000 Miles, 5 speed. Hi-Tech 
Wheels. Rear Dcf.. 4 cyl.. $9(KX). 
49.5-1708. 


1980 SPIRIT DL. 1 sp. ExceUcnl 
condilion. 74.000 miles. $1.T50. 942- 
1020 . 


116. Trucks-Vans 


1984 Chevy S-IO pickup. AM-FM 
stereo. Sharp. $4,444. 

LOU LaRICHE 
CHEVY/SUBARU 

Plymouth Rd. ju.st West of 1-275 

453^600 


1985 Chevy Astro Van. pwr. .stccr- 
inR. brakes, air and lots more! ! 
$10.5X)6 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1985 Chevy pickup. 1/2 ton auto¬ 
matic. pwr. stccrinR/brakcs. lonR 
bod’ $6,872. 

GORDON CHEVROLET 
427-6200 


1984 Ford Bronco 11. 2 tone paint. 
Black/Silvcr. Chrome wheels. 
Loaded. $8,993. 

Dick Genthc Chev. 
283-:M00 


1974 FORD truck with recreation¬ 
al camper. 721-1368. 


1*178 CHEVY 3/4 TON pick-up. P/ 

S. P/B. 4 sp.. :i50 V-8 cnRinc. new 
exhaust, starter, clutch, and much 
more. $1350. will ncKoliale. 941- 
6187. 


1985 FORD TRUCK F-250. diesel 
6.9. 8’ bed. 4 speed, radial tires. 
.33.(X)0 miles. $86.50. H.W. Motors. 
981.1.5.T5 or 397-0101. Canton. 


1978 FORD E .350 Van. runs Rood. 
askinK .$700, 729-5990. 


1975 DODGE VAN. fully carpeted. 
AM-FM stereo, runs Rood. $500 or 
best offer. .397 .3404. 


118. Motorcycles 


1986 HONDA SPREE moped, 
black, excellent condilion. call 
.522-2274. 


FIVE HORSEPOV/EIl mini bike 
$1.50. 277-8684. 


1975 KAWASAKI .3.50. Rood dirt 
bike, no title. $100. 729-.3300 days. 
699-9102 after 6 p.m.. ask for 
Nanci. 


1981 Chevy CarRo Van. automatic. 
43.0(X) miles, very Rood condition 
$6,990. 

Dick Genlhc Chev. 
28:1-3400 



1*185 CMC Jimmy. 1 x 4. I owner, 
air. automatic. $9,890. Tahoe 
packaRe. 

Dick Genthc Chev. 
283-3400 


3 . 9 % APR FINANCING 

OR 

REBATES UP TO 200 


1982 Chevy C-104 wheel drive pick¬ 
up. 51.000 miles, short box. auto 
irans. air. pwr. steerinR. pwr 
brakes. $6,992. 

Dick Gcnlhc Chev. 

283-:J400 


1987 CAUIS 
COUPE 

Air. Auto, Stereo and Cassette, 
plus More, Derrx). Stk. #2265 

si0,625‘ 


1982 Ford 3 1/2 ton pickup w/ 
camper, sleeps 6. loilcl. loaded 
$7.99*1. 

Dick Genlhc Chev. 
2H3-3400 


1985 Chevy Customized Van. tu- 
tonc. hrown/Rold. completely 
loaded. 1 owner, 28.000 miles. 
$14,800. 

Dick Genthc Chev. 
283-:f400 

1986 Astro Van. loaded. 1 owner. 7 
passcnRcr seatinR. $11,900 

Dick Genthe Chev. 
283-34(X) 


1986 DELTA 
|“88”ROYALE BEGM 
SED. 

Loaded. Demo. Stk. #753 

n 2,765* 



All Prices 
Slashed 
Down 

NOW 

8,000 


1986 CUTLASS 
SUPREME BRGM. 
CPE. 

Loaded. Demo. Stk. #90 

^11,995* 


1986 CUTLASS 
CIERA“S” COUPE 

Loaded. Demo. Stk. #764 

n 0,382* 


1986 CUTUSS 
SUPREME BRGM. 
CPE. 

Loaded. Derrx). Stk. #90 

M 1,995* 


1987 CUT. CIERA 
SED. 

Ar. Pwr. Locks. Sler. with 
Cassette. Plus More. Demo. Stk. 
#2060 

S11,185* 


NEW ’86 DELTA 
“88” ROYALE 

Stk. #1006 

ni,875* 


1986 “98” REGENCY 
BROUGHAM SEDAN 

Demo. Loaded. Stk. #257 

*15,131* 



Oil Change, Filter & Lube 

*15 


IncMN f« TWf GM car h I 
fht-ivirt ell chm8. a «n oU 
I flltir. pregtf chanfs lobilcatleii. 
^ an4 a chick ol iltlirmtUI vd 
tranaaisalofl flnlis. 

E^jres 5-30-87 





USED CAR LOT 



24555 MICHIGAN AVE 
1 BLK. W OF TELEGRAPH 


565-6500 





24SS5 MICHIGAN 
1 Bik. W. of Toloeraph 


565-6500^ 


WRITE YOUR OWN CLASSIFIED AD 


SIMPLY FILL IN THE COUPON BELOW AND MAIL 
IN ALONG WITH YOUR PAYMENT. YOUR AD WILL 
APPEAR IN ALL 6 OF OUR PUBLICATIONS. 

WAYNE EAGLE • WESTLAND EAGLE • CANTON EAGLE 

• BELLEVILLE ENTERPRISE • ROMULUS ROMAN • 

• INKSTER LEDGER-STAR. 

*6“ - 1st 15 WORDS, 25^ EA ADD. WORD 




^ET POSITIVE re- 
..ae when you advertise in the 
Classified columns! Call 729-3300. 


PRICE IS IMPORTANT when 
you advertise somethinR for sale 
in the Classifieds. Increase your 
response by including the price! 
CaU 729-3300. 



MAIL TO: 

CLASSIFIED 

ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS 
P.O. BOX 578 
WAYNE, MI 48184 


.iv r-' 








^5W//V6 $^Q00 

P* SALE oowi 


DOWN* 




<D 


NAME, 


r: ADDRESS 
;.CITY_ 


PHONE 
CC#- 



1 

2 

- 

6 

7 


11 

12 


16 

17 


21 

22 


10 


13 


14 


15 


18 


19 


20 


23 


24 


25 


c 




1984 - 5 & 6 TEMPOS 

9 To Choose Fro.n 


PRICED FROM 


*3,995 


1981 BRONCO 4X4 

v-8. Auto. P/St, P/Br, Air, Low Mileage 


SALE PRICE 


*5,988 


1983 FORD CONVERSION VAN 

4 Captain Chairs plus Rear Couch. Tilt, Cruise. Factory Air, Stereo. 
2 TO CHOOSE 

*8,488 


SALE PRICE 


1985 EXP COUPE 

Beautiful Gold & Black Finish, Loaded With Extras 

*6,495 



SALE PRICE 


1983 MERCURY LYNX 

2 Door, 19,000 Actual Mites, Showroom Dean 

^3,488 


1979 CAPRI RS 

V-6. Auto. P/St. P/Br. Sun Roof. 
LOOKS AND RUNS LIKE NEW 


SALE PRICE 


^2,988 


1985 FIERO GT 

Jet Black Finish. Auto, AC, Tltt, Stereo, P/St. P Br 

PRICED TO SELL ^9,588 


1985 MUSTANG LX 

3 Door, V-6, Auto. A/C. Cassette. P/St., P/Br., Cruise 


SALE PRICE 


*6,988 


. 


1984 FORD CONVERSION VAN 

Beautiful 2-Tone Blue Finish, Dark Blue Cloth Intehor, Auto. Factory Air. 
Ciuise. P/SL, P/Br., 4 Captain Chairs, Table and Couch 

PRICED TO SELL AT 0,988 

1985 FORD T-BIRD 

One Owner, New Car Trade, Silver Blue Finish, Loaded with Extras 

SALE PRICE ^,988 

1986 ESCORT 4 DOORS 

7 To Choose From 

Auto. A/C, P/St., P/Br., Stereo 

PRICED FROM 1 05 

1986 ESCORT 

2 Door Auto PSt, A/C, 2-Tone Silver Finish, One Owner. New Car 

*5,388 

1984 ESCORT STATION WAGON 

Auto, P/St.. A/C, Stereo. Bright Red Finish 

$4 288 

SALE PRICE 

1985 FORD T-BIRD 

Full Power. Tilt Wheel. Cruise Control. AC. Stereo Cassette. 
LOOKS AND RUNS LIKE NEW 

SALE PRICE ^7,988 

1986 MUSTANG GT 5.0 

1 5 Spd.. A/C, Stereo, Cassette, Tilt, Cruise, Low Mileage 

1 SALE PRICE ^10,988 

1985 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 

4 Door. Full Power, Rus Many Extras 

SALE PRICE ^1 3,988 

1987 FORD AEROSTAR WAGONS 

Both 7 Pass., 3.0 Engines, Loaded With Equipment 

New Car Financing 

PRICED TO SELL 

TRANSFORATION SPECIAL 

1980 HORIZON - 4 DOOR 

Extra Clean, 2 Tone Paint, AQC 

SALE PRICE A'C, Stereo 

1985 FORD PICK UP F-250 

351 V-8. Auto. P/St.. P/Bf., AC. TiK and Cnjise plus Fiberglass Cap, 
Perfect for Towing 

I ^SALE PRICE ^8,488 

1985 FORD CROWN VIC 

4 Door, Luxury Interior, A/C. P/St, P/Br. P W, P/Seat. Tilt Wheel. 

Cnjise, Low Mileage, Must Be Seen ^ _ 

$Q 988 

SALE PRICE 


' With Approved Credit , 






37300 MICHIGAN AVE: WAYNE Ml 

721-656DTi 




' * ‘ ’ tr .iv I’'Hi'' ■ " 


1 






































































































































































































































»oo»: 


Page 10-B 


Associated Newspapers, Inc. 


XX K NKKD YOUR TRADE-IN NOW! TOP SSS 




1984 FLTD. BRGM. 
D’ELLEGANCE 


Triple black, leather int. 
Everything! 


1986 NEW 
YORKER FIFTH 
AVE.! 

9,000 act. miles, tilt, cnjise, 
leather. Better than new! 


$ 


13,995 »i 0,995 


1985 CIMMARON 

3,000. That’s Right, 3,000 
miles, auto., air, stereo tape. 
Better Than New! 

<9495 


1985 WINNEBAGO 
LE SHARO 

10,000 miles, super-charged 
turbo diesel, air, stereo, 
affordable! FAMILY 
SPECIAL! 


1982 BMW 3211 

Sunroof, air, stereo, road 
wheels, compare this. 

*8995 


1984 TOWN CAR 

Triple black, carriage roof, 
turbine wheels, LOADED! 


1976 LIMO 

Factory stretch, gold metallic, 
leather int., wires. Only one in 
town!. 


8895 *8995 


1982 MARK VI 

Carriage roof, leather wheel, 
leather int. Look at this! 


$ 


7995 


1986 CUTLASS 
CIERA BRGHM. 

4 dr., tilt, cruise, p. windows, p. 
dr. locks, rally wheels. Better 
hurry! 

*9885 

1981 COUPE 
DEVILLE 

Larxiau roof, wires, stereo/tape, 
velour int, urrcomparable! 


$■ 


3995 


$ 


8395 


1984 DATSUN 300 
ZX TURBO 

Anniversary edition, t-tops, 
stereo, cass., special paint This 
one in one of a kind. 

*10,995 

1983 MARK VI 
I DESIGNER 

4 dr., comp, dash, keyless, 

I alum, whls, some kinda steal at 

*8,995 

1978 COUPE DE 
VILLE 

40,000 act miles, vinyl roof, 
leather int., should be in your 
garage! 

*4695 

1979 SEVILLE 

50,000-one-owner miles, 
leather int., wires, tape. This 
one is spotless! 

Call Now! 

1984 ELDORADO 

Astro roof, leather int., cass., 
wires. Looking for the Right 
One! 

*12,495 


1984 SEVILLE 

Sim. conv. roof, wires, stereo, 
tilt, cruise. So much more on 
this one! 

*12,395 


1986 SEVILLE 

Cornilhian blue, leather int., 
wires. Today's carl Loaded! 




1985 VOLVO 760 
GLE TURBO 

Sunroof, auto, leather, wheels, 
stereo tape, you desire this 
one! 

*15,795 

1983 SEDAN 
DEVILLE 

30,000-one-owner miles, air, 
stereo, velour int. Can’t 
compare this one! 


1987 
SEVILLE 


23,995 


1987 

BROUGHAM 

* 21.595 


1987 

COUPE DE VILLE 

* 19,895 


1987 

ELDORADO 

* 23.495 


I y, ^ 

'.OTrrr,' 


'Tho cfirlng. sorvicing. selling Masler Dealer 
40475 Ann Arbor Hoad, Plymouth 
453-7500 
OponMon. & Thuta.'TII9PM 


» * ** •'irf 

MAsIlK 

niAIIK 




A Caring, Servicing, Selling Masler Dealer 

5901 S. Pennsylvania 

(1-96 exit 104, Pennsylvania Ave., North) 

Lansing (517) 393-5600 

Open Mon. & Thurs. 'Til 9 P.M. 'Z 

All Day Saturdays. !'/ 


•All loases—Tolnl paymonls 
may ho calculated by multi* 
lying the payment bv tho 
Jffrns All payments are plus 
•t% use tax All leases are 
tiased un approved credit 


*17,995 *4395 


1982 REGAL 
LIMITED 

4 Dr., two tone, velour, wires, 
tilt, cruise. Shopper’s only! 

$. 


1985 CAPRICE 
CLASSIC 

Air, stereo, velour int., loaded. 
Simply spotiess! 

*7395 


’80 CUTUSS 
SUPREME BRGM 

55,000-one-owner miles, 
Landau roof, road wheels, 
Super Sharp! 

*2495 


'84 FLEETWOOD 
BROUGHAM 

Silver metallic, velour int., wires, 
low miles, stereo cass. Hurry! 

*11,395 


’80 CUTUSS 
SUPREME BRGM 

65,000 one owner miles, 
Larxiau roof, road wheels 
Super Sharp! 


1984 FIERO SE 

Air, stereo, sunroof, GT tires. 


$, 


6395 


1985 ELDORADO 

17,000-one-owner miles, 
landau roo^ wires Should be 
in the showroom! 

*15,895 

1983 COUPE 
DEVILLE 

Sandstone metallic, wires, 
stereo, leather. It cannot find a 
fault! 

*7495 

1985 SEVILLE 
ELEGANTE 

Two-tone corisole. extremely 
low miles, stereo tape. Last of 
its kind! 

LIKE NEW 

1985 TOWN CAR 
SIGN. SERIES 

Carriage roof, alum, whls., 
stereo tape. Compare this one! 

*10,995 

’84 98 REGENCY 
BROUGHAM 

4 Dr., full vinyl roof, wires, fully 
loaded, look rx) rrxxe! 

*8695 


1980 ELDORADO 

Sim. conv. roof, leather int., 
wires. One owner just 
arrived! 

*5495 


1983 SEDAN LIMO 

Dark blue Cadillac limo, velour, 
fully loaded. Arrive in style! 

*15,995 

1984 TORONADO 
BROUGHAM 

Sim. conv. roof, leather int., 
wires, dual 6-way seats. 
Simply stunning! 

*9695 

1985 COUPE 
DEVILLE 

Charcoal metallic, leather, dual 
way, alum. whls. Hurry! 

*11,995 

1986 98 REGNCY. 
BRGHM. 

Leather int., tilt, cruise,p. 
windows/dr. locks, | 
Oldsmobile’s finest! 

*11,995 


1986 RIVIERA 

Comp, dash, wires, stereo tape, 
look at this one! 


2495 ■* 


U r: NEE1> YOUR TfiADE-IN NOW! TOP PAID 



WE NEED YOUR TRADE-IN NOW! TOP $$$ PAID WE NEED YOUR TRADE-IN NOW! 






















































































































































































































































































































































I 8tWHiBllia^VICfe& 1 


This special section has been de¬ 
voted to services for senior citizens 
in the western Wayne County area. 

hope you will use and save this 
section as a reference tool for the 
various services offered to seniors 
throughout the year. 

- Ray Day, managing editor 


shelter 


HOUSING INFORMATION is avail¬ 
able for section 8 and subsidized 
housing, cooperative housing, feder¬ 
ally-sponsored loan programs, refer¬ 
rals to affordable private housing, 
shared housing programs, retire¬ 
ment housing information, landlord- 
tenant information and referrals to 
human service agencies through The 
Information Center, 26807 Michigan 
Ave., Inkster. Call 422-0405. 


HOME CHORE SERVJCES are pro¬ 
vided for seniors who need household 
maintenance tasks done for safety 
and well-being. Tasks include snow 
removal, grass cutting, installing or 
removing storm windows and 
screens, cleaning gutters or attics 
and more. For information, call your 
local services to seniors department 
or The Senior Alliance, 3850 Second 
St.. Suite 160, Wayne, 722-2830. 


HOME IMPROVEMENT INFORMA¬ 
TION is available for low- to moder¬ 
ate-income home improvement re¬ 
ferral and weatherization through 
The Information Center, 26807 Michi¬ 
gan Ave., Inkster. Call 422-0405. 



HOMESHARE is a service that will 
work with you, one-on-one, to match 
you with a compatible person to 
share a residence. Homesharing is at 
least two, and no more than three, 
unrelated adults sharing a residence 
who have common interests, needs 
and preferences. It is available to 
young adults and seniors, singles and 
couples, regardless of income level. 
Information how to be a part of the 
program is available through The In¬ 
formation Center, 26807 Michigan 
Ave., Inkster. Call 422-0405. 


HOME REPAIR is a service avail¬ 
able for seniors needing minor home 
repairs provided that they involve 
permanent improvements to the 
structure of a senior’s home to pre¬ 
vent or remedy substandard condi¬ 
tions. It includes repairs of items 
such as broken windows, stairs, rail¬ 
ings, patching roofs and more. For 
information, call your local services 
to seniors department or The Senior 
Alliance, 38.50 Second St., Suite 160, 
Wayne, 722-28.30. 

PERSONAL CARE/HOMEMAKER is 

an in-home service that includes light 
housekeeping, meal preparation, 
bathing, ambulation, cleaning, dres¬ 
sing, toileting, laundry and more. 
For information, call your local ser¬ 
vices to seniors department or The 
Senior Alliance, .3850 Second St., Suite 
160, Wayne, 722-2830. 


food needs 


CONGREGATE MEALS are avail¬ 
able at various sites within each of 
the local communities. The meals 
are served in group settings such as 
senior centers, churches and schools. 
They consist of one hot meal served 
five days each week to people age 60 
years and older or to the spouse of an 
eligible person. Each meal must pro¬ 
vide at least one-third of the Recom¬ 


mended Dietary Allowance for older 
people. For information, call your 
local services to seniors department 
or The Senior Alliance, 3850 Second 
St., Suite 160, Wayne, 722-2830. 


HOME-DELIVERED MEALS are 

served to homebound individuals who 
have no other resources - such as 
family or neighbors - to prepare 
meals. Each meal provides one-third 
of the RDA. Seniors must qualify for 
this program. For information, call 
your local services to seniors depart¬ 
ment or The Senior Alliance, 3850 
Second St., Suite 160, Wayne, 722-2830. 


health core 


HELPING SENIORS COPE WITH VI¬ 
SION LOSS is the goal of the Greater 
Detroit Society for the Blind. 
Teaching and counseling services 
are provided in homes of the visually 
impaired and blind people or in com¬ 
munity centers where seniors may 
gather. To be eligible, seniors must 
be age 60 or older, be visually im¬ 
paired or blind and live in Wayne, 
Oakland. Macomb, Washtenaw, 
Livingston, Monroe or St. Clair coun¬ 
ties. For information, contact the 
Society by writing to 16625 Grand Riv¬ 
er, Detroit, Mich. 48227 or by calling 
272-3900. 



“SERVING ALL FAITHS ’ 

LENTS FUNERAL HONIE 

4 WUmiOM m MANY FAMIUES SHICE 

mi 

721-5600 

J. LfNTS — C. Lents — T. Lynch — G. Eicholtz 

34567 MICHIGAN AVE., WAYNE, Ml 

48184 


I'AGE 2 MAY 27 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 






































































































WAYNE COUNTY OFFICE ON AGING 



Senior 
Employment 
Program 
Offers... 



Full or part-time employment 

Training and job search assistance 

To anyone 55 years and older 

To residents of Downriver and Western Wayne County 


^ Hme call 467'3453 



Other 

Available 

Services 



Adult Day Care 



H • Nutrition Program , 

--1 

* • Project Ayuda 


^ • Prescription Drug Program 


• Telephone Reassurance 


9 • Greenhouse and Gardens 


1 • Energy Education Center 


1 • Weatherization 


2 • Basic Adult Education Classes 


* • Arts and Crafts 


1 ^ tHoac call 


1 467-3450 ., 467-3451 



30712 MICHIGAN AVE. - WESTLAND, Ml. 48185 


ASSOCIATED rJEWSPAPERS INC MAY 27 1987 PAGE 8 

_ 


























































THE INFORMATION CENTER 

Answers ahy question and 
Help resolve any problem for Senior Citizens! 

CALL: 422-1052 (Western Wayne) 
or 282-7171 (Downriver) 

For free information and assistance! 

We can put you in touch with; 

Emergency Assistance In-home Help 

Health Care Legal Services 

Housing Information Nutritional Services 

and much more! 

Administrative Offices: 3221 Biddie Ave., Wyandotte. Ml 48192 (313) 282-7171 
This service Is funded in part by the Older Americans Act through 
The Senior Alliance, Area Agency on Aging 1-C. 



FREE TUITION 


FOR 

SENIOR CITIZENS 

Summer Classes Begin June 15 

Western Campus 
9555 Haggerty 
(Just North of 1-94) 
Belleville, Michigan 
(313) 699-0200 



COMMITTED TO 
QUALITY 


HEARING IMPAIRED SENIORS can 

receive assistance through the Deal, 
Hearing & Speech Center. The 
DH&SC is a nonprofit organization 
which provides assistance to seniors 
in southeastern Michigan. Interpret¬ 
ing services, referrals, a monthly 
newsletter, social and recreational 
activities, group activities and sup¬ 
port are offered. For information, 
visit the center at 26440 Puritan, Red- 
ford or call 533-.544.3. 

THE HEALTH CONNECTOR is a free 
service provided by the Peoples 
Community Hospital Authority to 
assist area residents in getting to the 
five PCHA hospitals for doctor’s 
appointments. A van will pick the pa¬ 
tient up at home free of charge and 
drive him to the specified PCHA hos¬ 
pital. For information, call the PCHA 
offices at 33000 Annapolis, Wayne. 
Call 467-4000. 

PACESETTERS is a walking prog¬ 
ram for seniors and all interested 
members of the community, spon¬ 
sored by Annapolis Hospital, Wayne. 
Initial membership for the program 
is $7 for seniors and includes a t-shirt, 
newsletter, routes and more. Upcom¬ 
ing walking adventures include a 
June 6 visit to the Garden City Spring 
Festival Wall, June 18 Mystery Wall¬ 
ing Trip and July 4 Fourth of July 
Celebration Walk. For more in¬ 
formation, call the Wayne Recrea¬ 
tion Department, 4635 Howe Road, 
Wayne, at 721-7400. 


ADULT DAY CARE is a supervised 
care program for older people, some 
who may be disabled, who need 
attention during the day when family 
or friends are not available. The ser¬ 
vice is a structured program of social 
and rehabilitative activities provided 
in a group setting. For information, 
call your local services to seniors de¬ 
partment or The Senior Alliance, 3850 
Second St., Suite 160, Wayne, 722- 
2830. 



Marian James call seniors in Wayne. 


TELEPHONE REASSURANCE will 
provide seniors with a phone call 
each day to check on their well being. 
The program is designed for both 
socialization and health purposes. 
For information, call your local ser¬ 
vices to seniors department or The 
Senior Alliance, 3850 Second St., Suite 
160, Wayne, 722-2830. 


"Keep Your Smile In Shape" 

FREE DENTAL CONSULTATION 



Stereo Headphones 
Available for 
Patient Relaxation 


EXAMINATIONS 
CLEANING 
X-RAYS 
FILLINGS 
EXTRACTIONS 
DENTURE REPAIRS 
DENTURE REPAIRS (Same Day) 
DENTURE RELINES (Same Day) 
DENTURES (Full and Partial) 
ROOT CANALS 
CROWNS (Cape) 
BRIDGES 
BRACES 
NITROUS OXIDE (Laughing Gas) 
COSMETIC BONDING 


20 % 

Senior 

Citizen 

Discount 




ALL INSURANCE PLANS ARE ACCEPTED 

Pays for Your Teeth Cleaning and Check up... Twice a Year 


MEDICAID 


\i V 


(Under 21 Kea^yALL DENTAL WORK IS FREE 
(Over 21 YearsUHE FOLLOWING SERVICES ARE FREE: 
EXTRACTIONS, TEETH CLEANING , AND FILLINGS 

Also DENTURES & DENTURE REPAIRS FREE to Qualified Persons in Medicaid Program 

INKSTER DENTAL CENTER 

Dr. Neti P. Mark - Famify PauHatiy 

3817 INKSTER RD. - Inkster 

6 blocks south of Michigan Avenue 

For Appointment, CALL 274-7100 

DENTURES ARE FREE for Qualified Patients on General Assistance! 




TRAVEL IN LUXURY 


AT HOME.. . .OR AWAY 


87 CROWN VICTORIA 
STATION WAGON 

^11.999®®- 


SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUTED PRICE 




87 CLUB WAGON 

FROM 

^11r999®®- 

SENIOR CITIZENS 
DISCOUNTED PRICE 


ASK ABOUT OUR ASSOCIATION WITH 
H.D.A OR MICHIGAN 


10% SERVICE & PARTS 


• plus frt. prep, deed, tax. Sc. 



HnnDicRppco 
DRivino 
RIDS of 

miOUGRR, IRC 



i’ACt 4 MAY 27. 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS, INC. 

















































STERLING HEIGHTS 

254-1770 

ROSEVILLE 

296-1950 


Vision Institute of Michigan 


WESTLAND 

32932 Warren Road 
(West of Venoy) 

525-2229 


The members of the Vision Institute of Michigan Cataract Support Group 
are just a few of the many with a better look at life. Because of the 
outstanding success with their surgeries, they participate with the 
Institute in educational programs and activities dedicated to the 
maintenance of healthy eyesight. The Institute is one of the country’s 
leading eye care treatment centers specializing in outpatient cataract 
surgery, glaucoma and laser treatment of eye conditions caused by 
diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. 


Most vision problems can be controlled or corrected if diagnosed early. 
In fact, over half of all blindness is preventable. Impaired vision is one of 
the top three handicaps of people over 65. Regular medical eye examina¬ 
tions are important in maintaining good vision. 


COMPLETE MEDICAL AND SURGICAL EYE CARE 
CATARACT AND LENS IMPLANT LASER SURGERY 

GLAUCOMA • Diabetes 

• Macular Degeneration 


YOU DESERVE 
A BETTER LOOK 
AT LIFE 


COURTESY TRANSPORTATION 

available to and from your appointment 


WAYNE LIVING CENTER 
FOR SENIORS 

... A HOME AWAY FROM HOME 

4425 Venoy Road, Wayne, Michigan 


SMTiKIFiaOiE 


WE CARE ” 


CALL TODAY 

For a Complimentai'y Tour 

326-S700 


• 24 Hour Supervision 

• Free Laundry Service 

• Activities Van 

• Full Dining Room Facilities 

• Beauty & Barber Facilities 

• Specialized Diets To Meet Your Needs 

• Recreational Activities 


• Interdenominational Services 

• Licensed Dietician 

• Staff Physician 

• Staff Nurse 

• Staff Podiatrist 

• Dental Services 

• Supervised Medication 


i; ? VISION seneENiNGS 

<Jairfor your appointmont 


HEALTH SCREENINGS are avail¬ 
able at seniors centers and housing 
complexes on a rotating basis. A 
general health check is conducted 
comprising of nine tests. For in¬ 
formation, call your local services to 
seniors department or The Senior 
Alliance, 3850 Second St., Suite 160, 
Wayne, 722-2830. 

The DISCOVER GOOD HEALTH 
PROGRAM is a service for seniors, 
sponsored by the Peoples Commun¬ 
ity Hospital Authority. Health 
screenings and tests are offered in- 
home and at various locations. For 
information, call the Wayne County 
Health Department at 467-3357. 


recreation 


• Romulus - Romulus Senior Citizens 
Drop-In Center, 36515 Bibbins, 
Romulus. 941-0666, ext. 257. Also, 
Romulus Senior Club No. 1, meets at 
11 a.m. each Tuesday. 

• Wayne - Wayne Community Ser¬ 
vices; 4635 Howe Road, Wayne. 721- 
7400, 721-7460 or 722-1111 (for 
emergencies). Also, The Golden hour 
Club meets at 11 a.m. Thursdays. 

• Westland - Senior Friendship Cen¬ 
ter, 1119 N. Newburgh Road. 722-7628. 

• Wayne-Westland Community 
Schools - Senior Adult Program at 
Dyer Center, 36745 Marquette, West- 
land, 595-2000. 

• Van Buren Township, Sumpter 
Township and Belleville-September 
Days Senior Center, 46270 Ayres, Bel¬ 
leville. 699-8918. Also, Edgemont 
Elementary School, 25 Edgemont 
Street, BeUeviUe. 697-0298. 


RECREATION, TRAVEL AND RE¬ 
LATED PROGRAMS are offered to 
seniors by the various senior citizen 
service centers in each of the local 
communities. Addresses and phone 
numbers of the centers follow. 

• Canton Township - Canton 
Township Recreation Center, 44237 
Michigan Ave., Canton. 397-1000, ext. 
278. Also, St. John Neumann Seniors, 
44800 Warren, Canton. 

• Inkster - Inkster Housing and Re¬ 
development Commission, 2000 S. In¬ 
kster Road, Suite 507, Inkster. 561- 
2600 or 561-2382. Also, Lehigh Center, 
29441 Lehigh, Inkster. 561-2891. 


educotion 


THE INFORMATION CENTER is 

available to provide help in the areas 
of emergency assistance, health 
care, housing information, in-home 
help, legal service, nutritional ser¬ 
vices and more. The center is located 
at 26807 Michigan Ave., Inkster. Call 
422-1052. 

OLDER AMERICANS MONTH is 

being celebrated by WTVS Channel 
56 Detroit. May 27, Managing Our 
Miracles: Final Choices will be 
broadcast at 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. 


































WMeKAL HOMES. Is*. 


31 ttc Hkif - Al nc: freeways 

fMtofd • 2S450 Plymoutti RH LKonIa - 37000 Six 
IMroft-4412IJMmotoAv«. CSI(313) 591-3700 
00(31^037-3^ 


(313) 037-3tt70 

ThisfW 


Q 

JAMUVMU 


DID YOU 
KNOW? 

receive medical 
assistance you do 
rx>t have to exhaust 
all o^f your assets. 
Send for *Vld You 
Know, Roport 0r 
‘for facts on pre-pald 
funeral exemptions. 


I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I. 


(PiMm Ml, mail or bring In Ibis uuipon.) 

Yes, I am interested in more de¬ 
tails on pre-paid Funeral Exemp¬ 
tions. No cost or obligation. 


CIty/StaMlp: 


COMPLETE 
COSMETICS 
AND GIFTS 
UNE 


PACKAGE 

LIQUOR 

DEALER 


DRUG MART 

1930 Venoy/At Palmer 
Westland 721-4884 

Your Prescription Specialists 
Discounted 3rd Party Co-Payments 

Senior Citizens Discounts 
on Prescriptions 


NEW 

DISCOUNT 

EVERYDAY 

PRICES 


OPEN EVERYDAY 
OF THE YEAR 
10 DAILY 10-6 SUNDAYS 


DAILY 

LOTTO 


DAILY 

OPEN 

HOUSE 


Here are but a few examples of the amenities you Mil find 

• Elegant private suites 

• Nutritious-delidous meals prepared in our modem kitchen daily 

• Impeccable housekeeping services 

• Convenient laundry and linen services 

• Total soaal, recreational and cultural activities program 

• Scheduled transportation via American House Vans 

• All utilities included - except telephone 



omERicnn 

HOUSE 

RETIRaiElfT RESIOfNCCS 


House Westland 
1660 Venoy Road 
Westland, Michigan 48185 

(313) 326-7777 


The OFFICES OF SERVICES TO THE 
AGING is available as an advocacy 
agency for people age 60 and older, 
the office advises the governor and 
state Legislature on special prob¬ 
lems with the elderly, promotes 
senior citizen interests and adminis¬ 
ters federal (pider Americans Act 
programs. Write: Offices of Services 
to the Aging, P.O. Box 30026, Lans¬ 
ing, Mich. (517) 373-8230. 


CITIZENS FOR BETTER CARE is a 

Michigan-based consumer organiza¬ 
tion concerned with improving the 
qualify of long-term health care. 
Question about a long-term care 
program can call 1-800-292-7852 for 
assistance. 




The SENIOR ALLIANCE is a private 
nonprofit organization which oper¬ 
ates as the designated Area Agency 
on Aging for western and southern 


Wayne County. The Alliance spon¬ 
sors a newsletter, resource library 
and information about countless ser¬ 
vices to the aging. The Alliance is 
located at 3850 Second Street, Suite 
160, Wayne. Call 722-2830. 

STEPPING UP HOME SAFETY is a 

film available for agencies and orga¬ 
nizations specializing in programs 
for the aging from Citizens Insurance 
Company of America. For informa¬ 
tion on how to obtain the film, call 
(517) 546-2160. 

NEW BEGINNINGS is a program de¬ 
signed for those people who have ex¬ 
perience the death of a loved one. In 
order to understand more completely 
the reactions to grief, six, weekly ses¬ 
sions will be offered under the gui¬ 
dance of three area clergymen. Ses¬ 
sions will be conducted from 7 to 9 
p.m. Monday, beginning June 15 at 
the First Congregational Church of 
Wayne, 2 Towne Square, Wayne. 
There is no fee. For more informa¬ 
tion, contact Audrey Tucker at 721- 
7400. 


The AS PARENTS GROW OLDER 
program will be offered by the Wayne 
Senior Services office and Senior 
Alliance beginning May 27 and ending 
June 24 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. each 
Wednesday at the Wayne Community 
Center, 4635 Howe Road, Wayne. 
Primary purpose of the program is to 
inform the adult child about the 
changes and adjustment involved in 
the aging process with the goal being 


NOTE: Specific features of credit union 
services are continually updated to best 




You, Too, Can Belong 
To The Upper Class 




at 

WESTLAND 

federal credit union ' 


Qualifications 

If you are 50 years of age or over, just visit 
our office and meet one of the following re¬ 
quirement^ 

1. Open an IRA with a minimum balance 
of $500. 

2. Start Direct Deposit of your Social 
Security. Pension, VA or net pay check 

3. Combine a savings account with a 
$2,500 minimum balance with an 
active share draft account 


Privileges 

Of The Upper Class 

• 200 printed share drafts free per year 

• Minimum balance requirements on share draft 
accounts waived 

• Visa Traveler Cheques (1% fee waived) 

• Free Notary Service * 

• Lifetime Membership 

• Special V.I.P. Membership Identification Card 

• No*AnnuaI-Fee Visa Card (for qualifying members)9 

• 24-Hour Teller Card fee waived 
Wire Transfer Service 
Savings by mail 

High yield, low minimum savings plan 
Tax preparation and financial planning services 
Free Rand-McNally Road 
Atlas and Vacation Guide 


YOUR COMPLETE FIHAriCIAL CEIITER 

LOAM SERVICES 

Consumer Loans 
Auto Loans (new/used) 
Home Improvement Loans 
Second Mortgage Loans 
Overdraft Loans 
Revolving Credit 
Visa Credit Cards 
★ Credit Life and Disability 
Insurance Available 


NCUA 


SAVINGS SERVICES 

★ Share (Savings) Accounts 

★ Money Market Share Accounts 

★ Money Market Certificates 

★ Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) 

★ Christmas and Vacation Clubs 

★ Each Member Account insured to 
$100,000 by NCUA 


★ 

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WE HAVE THREE 
LOCATIOHS TO 
SERVE YOU! 

MAIN OFFICE 

34646 Sims 
Wayne 

WEST1j\ND branch 

32750 Ford Road 
Westland 

INKSTER BRANCH 

1339 Inkster Road 
Inkster 





























































SBMDB sBmtca 


1 


'K 


to create a greater understanding of 
the experience of growing older. Five 
sessions are offered. For information, 
call Audrey Tucker at the Wayne 
Senior Services Office at 721-7400. 


LEGAL ASSISTANCE is offered in 
areas such as wills, pensions, hous- 
ing, social security and more. It in¬ 
cludes the provision of counsel, rep¬ 
resentation and legal education. Ser¬ 
vice is offered on a rotating basis at 
local community centers. For in¬ 
formation, call your local services to 
seniors department or The Senior 
Alliance, 3850 Second St., Suite 160, 
Wayne, 722-2830. 

LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN 

is for residents of long-term care faci¬ 
lities such as nursing homes. It in¬ 
cludes investigation of complaints 
and appropriate follow-up action to 
help resolve the issue. Information 
about care in nursing homes is also 
available. For information, call your 
local services to seniors department 
or The Senior Alliance, 3850 Second 
St., Suite 160, Wayne, 722-2830. 

INFORMATION AND REFERRAL is 

for individuals and family members 
seeking information about services 
can contact the I & R provider. The 
service involves information-giving 
and referral contact. For informa¬ 
tion, call your local services to 
seniors department or The Senior 
Alliance, 3850 Second St., Suite 160, 
Wayne, 722-2830. 


NURSING HOME COMMUNITY 
COUNCILS provide activities de¬ 
signed to organize and support 
nursing home community councils 
to serve the residents of a particu¬ 
lar nursing home through involve¬ 
ment of the local community. 


dislrkt hospitols/dinks 



\ 

V 





Stay On Top Of 
The Pressure 

Free Monthly Hypertension 
Screenings at the Henry Ford 
Medical Center in Canton 

The Henry Ford Medical Center in Canton is offering 
FREE Hypertension (high blood pressure) 
screenings from 4 to 8 p.m., the first Tuesday of 
every month. 

Just walk into the Canton Center on TUESDAY, 
JUNE 2 (and every first Tuesday of the month) to 
stay on top of your blood pressure. 




Sumpter Clinic, 24101 Sumpter Road, 
Sumpter Township. 697-9455. 

• Westland Medical center, Merri- 
man Road, Westland. 467-2300. 


emergency numbers 


EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 
FOR THE AREA include; 

• Belleville - 699-2033 or 697-9311 

• Canton - 379-3000 or 397-1000 

• Huron Township - 753-4400 or 753- 
4411 

• Inkster - 561-9040 

• Romulus - 941-8400 or 941-1111 

• Sumpter Township - 697-2414 or 699- 
3211 

• Van Buren Township - 699-2550 or 
697-9444 

• Wayne - 911 

• Westland - 722-9600 or 721-2000 


LOCATION OF AREA HOSPITALS 

follows. 

• Annapolis Hospital, 33155 Annapo¬ 
lis, Wayne. 467-4000. 

• Oakwood Hospital - Canton Center, 
7300 N. Canton Center Road, Canton. 
459-7030. 

• Sumpter-Oakwood Hospital and 
Family Practice, 19130 Sumpter 
Blvd., Sumpter Township. 699-2094. 

• Wayne County Health Department 


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42680 Ford Rd. 

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ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC. MAY 13. 1987 PAGE 19 























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PAGE 20 MAY 13, 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 





























































Make it Your Business 
to make it to .. . 

DETROIT FALL 1987 

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Tuesday, November 17,1987 -10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 
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ASSOCIATCD NEWSPAPERS. INC MAY 13, 1987 PAGE 3 


















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PAGE 4 MAY ) 3, 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 





























:S'>0L7c-^ 








★ , 

★ 7 ★ 

★ / ★ 

. STAR 1 

^ INC. W 

“We are imprinting specialists 










CELEBRATE MICHIGAN’S BIRTHDAY! 


We are proud to be License #002 of the State of Michigan to sell 
Sesquicentennial items. We handle both the 150th logo and the 
Bear logo. Some of the things we carry are: 


T-Shirts 

Sweatshirts 

Flags 

Glasses 

Mugs 

Lapel Pins 

Key Chains 

Clocks 

Buttons 

License Plates 

Coins 


We carry the actual toy 
Bear 9” and 13”. 


We have a Limited Edition of Cut Giass with the 
Bear and the 150th iogo. There are oniy 1500 of 
each. Each has a certificate of authentication. 


Our hours are from 9 to 7 Monday - 
Friday. 9 to 12 on Saturday. 


Our business is wholesale and retail. 

3985 Fort Si. Lincoln Park. Ml 48146 

(313) 388-1279 


ATTENTION 

SMALL 

BUSINESSES 

AND 

LARGE 

CORPORATIONS 


Seven Star, Inc. 
is a business located 
in Lincoln Park. We can 
print your logo on shirts, mugs, 
glassware, calculators, clocks or hats. 

Delivery time is 2 to 4 weeks from date ot 
order. Imprinting on your stock is our specialty. 

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PAGE 6 


MAY 13. 1987 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 
































































































ROMULUS 



MICHIGAN WEEK 


FESTIVU 

































































































































































































































































































































































































































Getting ready ... 



These Romulus youngsters, De- 
Shawn Underwood, 12, Michael 
Underwood, 8 and Clifford Stewart, 8, 
diligently decorate their bikes in anti¬ 
cipation of the Michigan Week Parade 
next week. Jeff Goldsmith, revs up 
his Big Wheel engine before the 
Grand Prix race on Saturday. ANP 
photos by Guy Warren/staff photographer. 


AUTOMOTIVE TIRE AND SERVICE INC. 


STATE OF MICHIGAN REG. #F129710 



32640 Michigan Avenue 
Wayne, Michigan 
Telephone: 721-8400 


CHUCK RAY 


FIRESTONE 

MICHELIN 

UNIROYAL 

GOODYEAR 

DUNLOP 


SSSSES25 

car care centS^' 


TM\ 


BRAKES‘FRONT END ALIGNMENT 
AIR CONDITIONING • MUFFLERS 
TUNE-UPS • BATTERIES 
SHOCKS • CUSTOM WHEELS 
LUBE & OIL • COMPUTERIZED BALANCE 




LUBE/OIL & 


FILTER 

CHANGE 


Most American Cars 
and Light Trucks 

Our automotive pros will lubricate your 
car’s chassis, drain old oil and add up to 
five quarts of Pennzoil 10W30, plus in¬ 
stall a new oil filter. 


$12.95 


Reg. 16.95 


With Coupon 
Exp. 5-30-87 


BRAKES 


FRONT & REAR 


Semi-metallic pads extra. 
Most American cars. 

• Rear brake lining 

• New pads 

• New seals 

• Turn rotors 

• Road test 

• Turn drums 

• Repack bearings 

□ Most American cars 


As Low As 


$109.95 


Clip & Save 


With Coupon 
Exp. 5-30-87 


FRONT 

WHEEL 

ALIGNMENT 


Align front wheels, setting all adjustable 
angles to manufacturer’s specs. Most 
Cars. Parts extra if needed. 


$15.90 


With Coupon 
Exp. 5-30-87 




iV W b 1987 


ASSOCIAFLD Nf WSPAPERS INC 

















































’ ff 9» r ^ r: ^ r '! T7 


Committee plans a super birthday party 



Members of the Romulus Michigan Week Festival Committee are from left, 
Kathy McCallum, Gil White, Gayle Mach, Kris DeTroyer, Kathy Darnell and 
Warren Arwood. Not pictured are Bill Crane, Dennis Davidson, Mary Ann 
Wells and Mel Zilka. ANP photo by Guy Warren/staft photographer. 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 

omulus residents just can’t 

R settle down. As the Artrain 
still lingers as a recent 
memory, dozens of local re¬ 
sidents are expected to particiate in 
the Romulus Michigan Week Festiv¬ 
al, May 15 to 22. 

And the theme for the festival this 
year? What else? The 150th birthday 
of the state. 

This is the fifth year Romulus 
citizens have honored their home 
state in terms of a citywide festival. 
And in this case, practice is making 
perfect. 

Highlights of the festival this year 
include the kickoff parade on Friday, 
the Romulus Community Pride lOK 
run on Saturday, Kiwanis Club Pan¬ 
cake breakfast, Wade Shows, youth 
games, entertainment, log carver. 
Dr. Ken Boshell, raffles, drawings 
and, of course, a beer tent. 

The Romulus Horseshoe Club will 
conduct the annual tournament dur¬ 
ing the festival. And the Romulus Arts 
Council will sponsor their Third 
annual Student Art Exhibit on the fes¬ 
tival grounds. All art exhibits will also 
follow the Sesquicentennial theme, 
officials report. 

‘‘Things are shaping up,” said De¬ 
nnis Davidson, festival committee 
member. “Everything is pulling 
together. The dance floor, the tables, 


chairs and tents. Advertising has 
been mailed. As always, we hope this 
year will be even bigger and better. It 
was last year.” 

Last year, more than 10,000 people 


from across Wayne County visited the 
Romulus Festival on the grounds be¬ 
hind the recreation building, located 
at the corner of Bibbins and Shook 
streets. And that site will be ‘‘home” 


to festival-goers this year as well, 
according to Gayle Mach, another of 
the 11-member festival committee. 

According to Mach, new entries 
have been added to the already long 
list of festival events. Among the most 
exciting, she said, is the addition of a 
diaper derby that is sure to knock the 
pants off every spectator. 

In addition, those who have grown 
out of the Snuggies will want to join 
the ‘‘Rotten Sneaker Contest,” spon¬ 
sored by Wayne County Parks and 
Recreation Department. There are no 
age restrictions as most people have 
at least one pair of old, ragged, smelly 
tennis shoes stuffed in the backs of 
their closet. Don’t be ashamed, you 
might be a winner, Davidson prom¬ 
ised. “And if we can’t find them in- 
Romulus, we can’t find them ainp- 
where,” he joked. 

Bob Springfield, comedian-singer- 
guitar player and one-man show, will 
perform for the first time in Romulus 
during the festival on Sunday night. 
Springfield is a regular entertainer at 
Alexander’s in Westland. 

“He’s quite an entertainer and very 
funny. When he’s finished with his 
show, your face hurts from 
laughing,” Davidson remarked. 

Other entertainment includes 
Elvis-impersonator Sherman Arnold. 

“He hands our scarfs to the ladies, 
kisses ’em and gets ’em all excited,” 
said Bill Crane, festival chairman. 


Fred & Mary's Party Store 

37575 Hurori River Dr., Romulus 


GRAND OPENING 



^.09 8 «, 
®1.29 am, 



*1.89 epao, 
*1.29 am, 


ECKRICH 

Bologna 

*1.79. 


& a**-. 



COKE 

*1.99 ep«. 
*1.29 am. 


FRESH DELI/SANDWICHES 
HOT or COLD 


HOMO MILK 
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OPEN 
7 DAYS 



% 


HURON RIVER DR. 


Q 

CC 

< 

O 

O 

O 

O GRANT 


941-4670 



ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS, IImC MAY 6 1987 PAGi 






























































V. M 


From horseshoes, clowns and sneakers . . . 


TUESDAY, MAY 12 

6-11 p.m. Wade Show carnival 
opens. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13 

3-11 p.m. Wade Show carnival 
opens. 

THURSDAY, MAY 14 

3-11 p.m. Wade Show carnival 


opens. 



FRIDAY, MAY 15 

3-11 p.m. Wade Shows carnival. 

6 p.m. Bingo tent opens. 

6 p.m. Refreshment tent opens. 

6 p.m. Las Vegas tent opens. 

6 p.m. Entertainment tent opens. 

6- 10 p.m. Arts & Crafts Building 
opens. 

6 p.m. Michigan Sesquicentennial 
parade begins at city hall, proceeds 
through the downtown area and ends 
at the festival site. 

Each year, the kickoff event for the 
festival is the parade. Groups and/or 
individuals are invited to participate. 
Entry forms are available at the Re¬ 
creation Building. 

7- 11 p.m. Sherman Arnold and his 
band. Interstate. A tribute to Elvis. 
Entertainment tent. 

10 p.m. Nightly drawings - must be 
18 years of age and must be present to 
win. 

SATURDAY, MAY 16 

Youth and Heritage Day 

7 a.m.-2 p.m.Kiwanis Club Pancake 
Feast in refreshment tent. 

7:30 a^n. Registration office opens 
for 10-K run. Recreation Building. 

9 a.m. Romulus Community Pride 
10-K Road Run. 

10:30 a.m. Awards ceremony for 10- 
K Road Run. Entertainment tent. 

10:30 a.m. Men’s Horseshoe Tourna¬ 
ment begins. Grassy area at Bibbins 
and Sterling roads. 

11 a.m. Youth Grand Prix begins. 



Ages 3-8. Pre-registration is neces¬ 
sary through the Rec. Dept. 

This is a program for kids 8years of 
age and under. The Big Wheel Grand 
Prix will be in the parking lot of the 
Community United Methodist 
Church. All kids must furnish-their 
own big wheel. A pre-registration 
must be made by purchasing a driv¬ 
er's license for $1 from the Recreation 
Department by Thursday, May 14. 

Noon Youth Day games begins. All 


ages. Free. Grassy area at Bibbins & 
Sterling Roads. 

Free games will be available on the 
grassy area at Bibbins & Sterling 
Roads. Sponsored by the Festival 
Committee and the mayor's office. 

Noon Child identification finger¬ 
printing. 

Fingerprinting of children for the 
purpose of identification will be done 
throughout the festival in the Police 
Security trailer on the festival 
grounds. Sponsored by the Romulus 
Police Department. 

Noon Las Vegas tent opens. 

Noon Arts and crafts building 
opens. 

Noon Bingo tent opens. 

Noon Refreshment tent opens. 

Noon-2 p.m. Romulus High School 
Jazz Band. Entertainment tent. 

Noon to 4 p.m. Log-carving demon¬ 
stration. Item will be raffled. Featur¬ 
ing “Dr.” Kenneth D. Boshell. 

1 p.m. Diaper derby for tots. Pre¬ 
registration is necessary through the 
recreation department. 

This program is for toddlers who 
are crawling but not walking. The 
event will be at the Romulus Recrea¬ 
tion Building. All entries must purch¬ 
ase a crawling license from the re¬ 
creation department for $1 by Thurs¬ 
day, May 14. 

2-8 p.m. F ree blood pressure checks 
by Emergency Network - the first aid 
trailer. 



OAKITE PRODUCTS, INC. 

13177 Huron River Drive, Romulus, Ml 481 74 (31 3} 941-3800 


PACr l MAY G 1987. AbbOCIATcU NEWSPAPERS INC 


ROPER 

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standard equipment; 

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construction; 

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SPECIAL PRICE: 


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1299 



EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE, INC. 

17180 HURON RIVER DRIVE 
NEW BOSTON 753-4622 


















































■ ■ ■ 


festival 




goers will be in for some fun 


3:30-4 p.m. Prize drawings. Must be 
18 years of age and must be present to 
win. 

5 p.m. Vivian’s Dance Studio and 
the Romulus Recreation Department 
present an exhibition of ballet, jazz 
and tap. Grandstand area. 

6 p.m. Master Willie Adams and the 
recreation department present an ex¬ 
hibition of Isshinryu Karate. Grand¬ 
stand area. 

7:30-11:30 p.m. Live band, “First 
Choice,” country rock of the 50s and 
60s performs. Entertainment tent. 

8 p.m. (approximately) Presentation 
of Recreation Department’s Disting¬ 
uished Service Award. Entertain¬ 
ment tent. 

10 p.m. Prize drawings. Must be 18 
years of age and must be present to 
win. 

SUNDAY, MAY 17 

Noon Bingo tent opens. 

Noon Arts & Crafts Building opens 

Noon Las Vegas tent opens 

Noon Refreshment tent opens 

1 p.m. Rotten Sneaker contest spon¬ 
sored by the Wayne County Parks 
System. Ages 7-17. Grandstand area. 

Sponsored by the Wayne County 
Parks System, this contest will deter¬ 
mine the most rotten sneakers in 
Romulus. The contest is open to any¬ 
one ages 7-17 and will be on the festiv¬ 
al grounds, in the grandstand area. 
(Sneakers must be wearable). 


1- 2 p.m. Square-dance demonstra¬ 
tion sponsored by Larry and Shirley 
Webb. Entertainment tent. 

2- 2:30 p.m. Golden Twirlers youth 
baton demonstration under the direc¬ 
tion of Carol Kuhrt. Grandstand area. 

2-8 p.m. Free blood pressure checks 
by Emergency Network in the first 
aid trailer. 

2:30-3 p.m. Youth pom-pon demon¬ 
stration sponsored by Romulus Re¬ 
creation and under the direction of 
Carol Kuhrt. Grandstand area. 

4 p.m. Prize drawings. Must be 18 


years of age and must be present to 
win. 

5-10 p.m. Live entertainment by 
Bob Springfield. Entertainment tent. 

10 p.m. Prize drawings. Must be 18 
years of age and must be present to 
win. 

10:15 p.m. Giant 50/50 drawing. 

MONDAY, MAY 18 

Government Day 

Mayor’s exchange day. Romulus 
city officials will go to Allen Park for 
the day. 


TUESDAY, MAY 19 

Science/Technology Day 

Beacon School Science Fair partici¬ 
pants will sponsor a display at city 
hall. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 20 

Business, Industrial and Labor Day 

(Dr. C.J. Carpenter Day) 

11:30 a.m. Chamber of Commerce 
luncheon and installation of new offic¬ 
ers at Romulus Hilton Inn. 

“Future Development” display at 
city hall, sponsored by the Romulus 
Building Department and the Romu¬ 
lus Community Development Depart¬ 
ment. 

THURSDAY, MAY 21 

Education Day 

Mock city council meeting with 
Romulus High School government 
classes. 

FRIDAY, MAY 22 

Cultural Day 

Allen Park officials come to Romu¬ 
lus for the day. 

“Art in the Workplace” display at 
city hall, sponsored by the Romulus 
Arts Council. 

SATURDAY, MAY 23 

Farming and Aviation Day 

Plans incomplete. 




HKAiri) KF.NNH HOI SI 
.1 MIM irs tROM DI IKOH MLI KO AIRPORI 
AIKPOKI SPRVICl 

BILL WELLS KENNELS LTD. 

Full Grooming Services 


729-2329 


Bob Turner 
Bill Mango 


.T22K2 I'corse Road 
R<iiiiiilu.s. Ml IRI7I 


PUT BALANCE IN YOUR WALK OF LIFE 



DAVID ROSENBERG, D.P.M., P.C. 
MEDICAL AND SURGICAL FOOT SPECIALIST 
15324 Michigan Ave. at Greenfield 
Dearborn, Mich. 48126 
Telephone 846-0121 Day or Night 


GOOD LUCK ROMULUS 

TRUCKS AND CARS 

ECORSE ELECTRIC 


ALTERNATORS - GENERATORS - STARTERS 
PARALLELS - SOLENOIDS 


MERLE MIKE NASH 

29653 ECORSE RD 
ROMULUS. Ml 48174 


PH. 729-3640 

THREE BLKS W OF MIDDLEBELT 



ROMULUS WASHER & DRYER REPAIR 
30154 Beverly Road 
ROMULUS, MICHIGAN 48174 
Phone 728-6010 
’ Larry Oobbyn 

years 


COMPLIMENTS 

TO 

ROMULUS 

Block Implement Co. 

15099 Middlebelt 

941-9385 


Susan Slone 

REALTOR" 


EARL KEIM 
REALTY 


□ 

RFALTOR- 



Bus. 287-4660 
Res 292-3520 
Cor Phone 690-4431 

VIKING, INC. TWO MILLION DOLLAR CLUB 

22347 GODDARD ROAD TAYLOR, Ml 48180 

Eoch office independenlly owned ond opcroted 


ASSOClATt D NFVVSPAPrR.S 


MAY h 198/ 


PAGE b 




































“WE ARE PRQUD” 

To be a part of the SESQUICENTENNIAL 
and we SALUTE the COMMUNITY PRIDE! 









TOSSED FRESH ALL DAY! 


Garden Salad 



NEW GARDEN SALAD. Not your 
ordinary, garden-variety salad. This 
one’s a cool, fresh combination of 
iceberg lettuce, celery and carrot, 
topped with radish and cucumber. 
Then we add thick wedges of egg 
and tomato, and grated Cheddar 
cheese. Choose your favorite dress¬ 
ing. Tossed fresh all day. 

Distinctive Dressings; 

• French • 1000 Island 

• Bleu Cheese • Lite Vinaigrette 

• House • Oriental 

At Participating McDonaldls* 



9777 S. Wayne Rd. 
Romulus, Mich. 


Chef Salad 



NEW CHEF SALAD. Our “Cher 
serves up julienne strips of succu¬ 
lent turkey and ham alongside 
cheese, egg and tomato wedges atop 
a mound ol fresh, crisp iceberg 
lettuce, celery, radish, cucumber 
and carrot. Cap it off with your 
choice of dressing. 


Chicken Salad 

or^ierjtaL 



NEW CHICKEN SALAD owieriCoL 
Loaded with big, tender chunks of 
cliicken, iceberg lettuce, green pep¬ 
per, water chestnuts, celery and 
ripe tomato. Sprinkle on crunchy 
chow mein noodles and our special 
Oriental dressing for a deliciously 
satisfying change of taste! 



Flipping out 


Members of the Romulus Kiwanis Club from left John Lewkowicz. Tom 
Janack and Fred Hay will flip your pancakes at their annual Pancake 
Festival all day Saturday during the Michigan Week Festivities, anp photo by 

Guy Warren/staW photographer 



The 

Wheel Truck 

_ Stop 

31414 ECORSE ROAD - ROMULUS 

Presently in our 31 st 
year 

of Business 

SALUTES 

The 

City of Romulus 

During 

MICHIGAN WEEK 
1987 


PAGL o 


MAY 6 1987 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 






















































































New and improved 

Mayor sees her city with 
positive change in image 


leven days of non-stop hoo- 

E pla are expected in Romu¬ 
lus during the annual 
Michigan Week Festival. 
And ihis year more than ever, the city 
beckons citizens from all over Wayne 
County to join in on the fun and excite¬ 
ment. 

The people are coming. Romulus 
Mayor Beverly McAnally is sure of it. 

Coney dogs, cotton candy and upset 
stomachs are just parts of the fun par¬ 
ticipants can look forward to during 
the upcoming city celebration. 

“It’s one of those things a small 
town does best,” McAnally reminded 
visitors and residents. “Most people 
in Romulus know one another. They 
work together and play together. 
Their efforts are friendly and posi¬ 
tive. Community residents are united 
by the festival.” 

“Business people and community 
residents have also really got behind 
the festival effort this year. Weather 
is another factor,” she said. 

“Not only is there an entertainment 
tent, but the Downriver Community 
Conference donated an outdoor stage. 
Who knows, maybe there will be danc¬ 
ing under the stars,” said Gayle 
Mach, festival committee member. 


Local sponsors of the many raffles 
and drawings include Romulus Auto 
Parts, Romulus Video and Tanning 
Salon, Romulus City Drugs, Romulus 
Hardware, Windiate Hardware, Cro- 
va Sales and Service, Johnson Fuel 
and Supply, Stearns Hardware and 
others. 

“The Wade carnival is always ex¬ 
citing. And everyone looks forward to 
the parade on Friday. The festival 
brings people downtown who normal¬ 
ly wouldn’t be here. Sure enough, they 
see there is a hardware store, drug 
store, supermarket just like any city. 
We could have and do need more. But 
the image of Romulus is constantly 
improving,” McAnally explained. 

The affiliation of Romulus with the 
DCC and the Conference of Western 
Wayne, both consortiums of several 
local communities, has helped in¬ 
crease the exposure of Romulus 
among local municipalities, McAnal¬ 
ly said. 

“Now a lot of people know about 
Romulus. Before they didn’t know 
where it was, what it was or what it 
looked like. Romulus is making a 
favorable impression in all of Wayne 
County,” McAnally said with a smile. 


Compliments 
to the 
City 
of 

Romulus 


KELSEY-HAYES 


Kelsey-Hayes Company, 
Romulus, Michigan 48174 
A subsidiary of Fruehauf Corporation 


Doesn't it 

make sense to bank 
where business 
banks? 




MANUFACTURERS BANK 


It does when you consider that you’re in charge of the most 
important business there is; the business of mana^ng your family’s 
finances. 

So why not utilize the vast 
business resources that have made 
Manufacturers Bank what it is today. 

Your family’s best choice for financial 
stability. It’s only common sense. 




Bank where business banks. 

MfmbtT FDIC 


36450 Goddard, Romulus 


941-0600 


KEGGER’S FOOD STORE 

BEER - WINE - LIQUOR - GROCERIES 
Mgr. Shamil Gappy MONEY ORDERS 500 Asst Mgr. Unda 


Boiled Ham 

79 


lb. 



Polish Ham 

$249 


lb. 



8 PACK 


PEPSI 
$229 


Miller/Miller Lite 

12 oz. 24 pack cans 

$089 


+ tax & dep. 




Hoffman’s 
Hard Salami 

$349 


lb. 


8284 Wayne Rd., Romulus, MI 48194 

(313) 722-0750 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC. 


MAY 6. 1987 


PAGE 7 












































Protect Your Greatest Asset 
... Your Health 


MAY 6. 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS INC 


Belleville Medical Clinic 
265 Main Street 
Belleville, Michigan 

48111 


697-9300 


WALK-IN 

8:00 AM to 11 H>0 PM 
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

Including Weekends & Holidays 


SUPER "Y" MARKET 

7130 MIDDLEBELT - ROMULUS 

728-0690 ,]l 

Liquor, Cold Beer & Wine 111 

Full Line of Grocery, Frozen Food & Dairy_ 

Deli & Sandwiches ^ 

Check Cashing • Store Hours 9-11 Daily, 11-8 Sun, 

We Specialize in 

Party Trays 

Available for Parties During Michigan Week, 
Graduations and all Occasions $2.50 per person 


Money 

Orders 

50* 


KEG BEER 


DAILY LOTTERY 


tnergetic pom glnTdemonstrate a cheer before thei^march "in'the 
annual Michipn Week Parade. Libby Scott stands at the left while Callie 
Scott IS on the right. In the back is Jennifer Webb and in front is Emily 
oCOtt.ANP photo by Guy Warren/staff photographer ^ 


( 

-_ 

MAYOR BEVERLY 
McANALLY 
City of Romulus 

hy the Beverty McAnally Campaign Committee. 6330 Hyde Park, Romulus, Ml 48174 


“Romulus 
The City of Pride 
Celebrates 152 Years 
of Achievement!” 


“Happy Birthday 
Michigan!” 


© FEDERAL 
MOGUL 

Precision Forged Products Division 

Salutes Romulus 

A great place to live... 
A great place to work! 




















































EVERINGHAM 
CLINIC P.C. 

OSTEOPATHIC 


David J. Everingham, D.O. 

GENERAL PRACTICE 


Craig J. Everingham, D.O, 

GENERAL PRACTICE 


12100 Huron River Drive 
(1 BIk. N. of Northline) 
ROMULUS, Ml 


941-1070 


BEST WISHES TO ALL 
THE FAMILIES IN ROMULUS 


Happy Birthday Michigan 
Our Great Sesquicentennial State 

★ _ ★ 


Salute to Romulus 
Our Great Sesquicentennial City 

L, 


' John B. Lewkowicz 

Forward to a Bright 
Future 

Paid for by the Committee to Elect John B. Lewkovijcz. 36723 Grant, Romulus, Michigan 48174 


A:.':>c)CIATI:D Nl WSPAPERS INC MA> 6 , 198 / PAGE 9 


Runners will roar 
In the annual race 


By BOB DENYS 
ANP Staff Writer 

hen the runners near the 
A ^starting line at the Romu- 
lus Community pride lOK 

T T race this year, they might 
just find a few hundred more contes¬ 
tants than last year. 

Organizers of the race said last 
week that the event will be “bigger 
and better” this year, with each con¬ 
testant assured of having a good time. 

Last year, 230 people of all ages and 
from many communities, several 
states and even other countries, cros¬ 
sed the finish line during the annual 
running event. At least 380 people are 
expected to participate in the Satur¬ 
day, May 16 event. 

The DoVvnriver Runners Club will 
sponsor the 6.2-mile race. The group 
boasts of 65 members. It was founded 
in Wyandotte three years ago by Dr. 
Mike Simms and Tony Mifsud, 
teacher and track coach. 

The runners regularly participate 
in the Detroit Free Press Marathon. 
Last year, the club organized a 5-mile 
race for the city of Allen Park, 
according to Nina Derda, race orga¬ 
nizer and director. 

“Pm just one of several organizers 
for the race. We hope to celebrate 


Michigan Week with the residents of 
Romulus. Maybe this will boost run¬ 
ning in the city,” she said. 

Pre-registration is suggested for 
the 9 a.m. race. Mayor Beverly McA- 
nally and Bill Crane, festival commit¬ 
tee chairman, will sound the cannon 
and fire the pistol to start the runners 
off. However, early birds can register 
the day of the race from 7:30 to 8:30 
a.m. in the Romulus Recreation Cen¬ 
ter Building, located at the corner of 
Shook and Bibbins streets. 

The race course winds around the 
paved downtown streets. Two moder¬ 
ate hills await the runners. First aid 
and water will be made available 
along the route. 

Entry fee is $7 and includes a t- 
shirt, refreshments and a drawing for 
prizes. 

“Am I going to run? You bet I am/’ 
said Nina Derda. 

Other members of the Downriver 
Runners Club who promise to make 
the race a success are Gerald Gomes 
and Jim Dennett. 

Bill Smith, organizer of the race 
during the first four inaugural years, 
said he would not be running this year 
because of his duties as newly- 
appointed principal of Barth 
Elementary School in Romulus. 


^4^utcigte 




LINDA CHOATE 


Romulus City Clerk 


Paid tor by the Committee to Elect Unda Choate, 37776 Walnut. Romulus. Michigan 48174 


Planning for Unity 
Deserving of Pride 


Give strength to 
new knowledge 
Belief is one’s will 


SALUTE TO ROMULUS 
DURING MICHIGAN WEEK. 

Paid for by the Committee to Elect Pennington. 10268 Romaine, Romulus. Ml 48174. 


ED'S HANGAR 


30747 EUREKA RD. 


(Near Airport - Oak Brook Plaza) 


LLJJSCHEON SPECIALS: HOMEMADE SOUPS 
• FRIDAY FISH FRY STARTING AT 11:00 A.M. 

AND* • •EUIE COq^iajlERE!^_ 

BRING THIS AD IN FOR 

$4 00 


EUREKA 


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OFF LUNCH 

DURING MICHIGAN WEEK 


















































< 




MORGAN 
MANOR 

APARTMENTS I 

1-94 & Wayne Road 




$404-445 for 2 bedroom 
apartments 
$360-380 for 1 bedroom 
apartments 


Applications being taken 
for several apartments. 
Included in rent: heat, hot 
water, Olympic swimming 
pool, HBO, 2 tennis 
courts. 


941-7070 




Histop/ is corning bao 


T he annual Romulus 
Michigan Week Festival 
emphasizes history, cul¬ 
ture and youth all at the 
same time. 

And members of the Romulus His¬ 
torical Society are not surprised at 
the successful combination of all 
three in this annual community 
event. 

Pearl Varner, .society president, 
explained that everyone can espe¬ 
cially relate to their own family his¬ 
tory. 

“In Romulus we’re particularly 
excited about festival time. Satur¬ 
day will be Heritage Day. This year, 
we’re honoring all local families 
who have been in Michigan 1.50 
years. And they don’t have to have 
lived in Romulus all that time,’’ she 
said. 

The state Sesquicentennial is the 
theme of many festivals throughout 
Michigan. Varner noted that Romu¬ 
lus residents already know how to 
pronounce “sesquicentennial” since 
the city celebrated its own in 1985. 
Romulus became a township in 18,35. 

Some early families living in 
Romulus back in 18.35 were: Mason 
Clark, Abner .Johnson, Samuel 
Tobyne (the first area settler), David 
Gardner and Joseph Pulsifer. 

“We know at least these people 
were living here because they are 
the only residents mentioned in the 




RESTORATION PROJECT 

U; 1839 

FUTURE HOIEOrTHE 
H<jrUjdLU^ HjuJjorUcaA PTi 


1827 census of the Michigan Terri¬ 
tory Federal Census. Anybody re¬ 
lated to any of these people would be 
a real find,” Varner explained. 

Currently, historical members 
are continuing their renovation of 
the first schoolhouse built in Romu¬ 
lus in 1839. Last year, the building 
was moved for the fifth time to, 
hopefully, a final location behind the 
Morris Post Office, located off of 
Goddard Road and the railroad 
tracks. 

Members are especially proud of 
the white pine flag pole they recently 
installed. The United States and 
slate Sesquicentennial flags now’ fly 


over what local residents have dub¬ 
bed the cultural center of Romulus. 

“We're still looking for original 
pictures of the old schoolhouse taken 
anytime from 18.35 to 1895 when it 
was used as a school. The school 
served mainly people in town. We’re 
trying to rebuild the front and so far 
have found three different types of 
siding. This is going to take a lot of 
research. We want the building to be 
as original as possible. We just want 
to get people thinking.” she said. 


Anyone with questions or informa¬ 
tion is urged to call 697-9628 or 941- 
0728. 



ii 


Celebrate 
Michigan 






150 Yecurs 
of 

Progress’ 


99 


WILLIAM WADSWORTH 
Romulus Councilmcm 

Paid for by th® Coownltte® to Ro-Eloct Winiam Wadsworth, 37710 Barth, Romulus, Ml 48174 



£iwazt*6 Computer Ceutze 


Dr. Ray Elwart 
Dr. Dan Elwart 

37511 HURON RIVER DR. 
ROMULUS, Ml 48174 



ROMULUS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC, P.C. 
“FOR HEALTH SAKE" 941 -.2211 


page .If) MAYS. 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS INC 




To Romulus 
during 

Michigan 

Week 





©omaM IP, SHaSo 


37211 Goddard Road 
Romulus, Ml 48174 


941 -0343 







4>. 


Pizzerzia 




WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE 
OF DELICIOUS SUBMARINE 
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FRI. - SAT. 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. 
SUN. 4 p.m. - Midnight 


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ANY PIZZA I 

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Festival will focus on young and old 


Youth, and the young at heart, will 
be the focus of the Romulus Michigan 
Week Festival this year. And, as in 
years past, countless activities have 
been designed to give those youngs¬ 
ters another opportunity to laugh, 
smile and release a few giggles. 

New events like the diaper derby 
and rotten sneaker contest have been 
added to the list of events, but a few of 
the old standbys like the big wheel 
grand prix haven’t been forgotten, 
festival officials said. 

While Wade carnival rides will 
again provide excitement and adven¬ 
ture for everyone, some “adult-only” 
entertainment will be found in the Las 


Vegas and beer tents. 

Young and old are guaranteed to 
enjoy the annual parade down the 
main street of Romulus on Friday 
evening. This kickoff event is fol¬ 
lowed by the lOK community race 
early Saturday morning where people 
of all ages are urged to participate. 

Saturday has been designated i 
‘‘youth day,” and several special 
events have been designed to interest 
young people. Most activities will take 
place on the grassy area behind Bib- 
bins and Sterling streets, including the 
diaper derby. Child fingerprinting will 
also be available for interested parents 
at this time. 


\fj& 


APE 


j\S CLOSE To 
YOU THINK 
OF US 


^Oo 




- BEST WISHES - 


K. SATA, DDS 

10000 S. Wayne Rd. 
Romulus, Ml 48174 



Painless Family Dentistry 


Wc Salute the Great Lake State 

Happy 150th! 



Same location for 59 years 

36425 Grant Road 

Romulus 

Mark J. Lewkowicz, President 

941-0411 


Congratulations Romulus 
on 150 years of proud 
heritage and best wishes 
for a continued legacy of 
growth with pride and 
unity. \ 

Mary Ann Banks 
Mayor Pro Tern 

PaW for by the Committee to elect Mary Ann Banks. 36917 Mario Ann Ct, Romulus, Ml 48174 



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SECURITY SYSTEM 


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313-721-3221 


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35425 ECORSE RD. 
ROMULUS, MICH. 48174 


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Romulu 



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Congratulations! 

Michigan Week in Romulus 


Get all YOUR news in The Romulus Roman 


SAVE $13 with mail subscription 


3 FREE MONTHS COUPON 


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ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS 
P.O. BOX 578 
WAYNE. Ml 48184 - 1689 


1 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC MAY 6. 1987 PAGE. 11 














































































































CENTRAL DISTRIBUTORS OF BEER, INC. 



I 











































































































































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PRIDE 
ON DISPIAY 


0EAL BOOTH t®SIGN CWTOTA 

_ Uttra-Oght PortabiSty 

^ SolicI Custom Look 

g( Check-in as 
^ Ships UPS 

Sets up in mkH^es 

^ Stunning GrapNc impact 


SKYUNE DISPLAYS 


t^ERICAN 
PRIDE 
ON DISPLAY 


SEE US AT BOOTH #627 

SKYLINE DISPLA YS/MICHIGAN 

2359 N. LIVERNOIS, SUITE 100, TROY, Ml 48083 • (313) 362-0115 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC. MAY 13. 1987 


PAGE 7 





































DETROIT ‘SMinm-StfiA SPRING ’87 


DANA COMMERCIAL CREDIT 


TODAY’S BUSINESS CLIMATE IS VERY COMPETITIVE 

YOU DON’T NEED A LEASING COMPANY THAT 
OFFERS JUST GOOD RATES 
YOU ALSO NEED QUICK RESPONSES, SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR YOUR 
CUSTOMERS 

DANA COMMERCIAL CREDIT IS A LEASING 
COMPANY THAT WILL GO THE EXTRA DISTANCE TO 
HELP INCREASE YOUR SALES 

WE HAVE PROVED THIS TO OUR CUSTOMERS 
LET US PROVE IT TO YOU, TOO 


WHY IS DCC THE BEST? 




s 



DANA C(JMMERCL\L CREUT 


3221 West Big Beaver Road 
Suite 106 
Troy, Ml 4-8084 


TERRY NALON 




iT- 


643-0990 


COME SEE US AT BOOTH #425 


643-0990 


We’ll tailor training courses for you 

Our corporate assignments have included: 

fl4S/C ELECTRONICS / CAD/CAM / FOREMAN TRAINING 
LADDER DIAGRAMS / MANAGEMENT & SUPERVISORY 
TRAINING / MICROCOMPUTERS / PLC 
QUALITY CONTROL / WELDING 
WORD PROCESSING 


M 




Wayne 

County 

Community 

College 

COMMITTED TO QUALITY 


We also can help you develop a 
grant proposal for state 
development funds to support 
your training needs. 

Call our Educational Services 
Department at 496-2626. 

Katrina VanderWoude 


PAGE 8 MAY 13. 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. 


INC 



















DETROIT SPRING ’87 


Small Business 

Economy is fueled by entreprenuers 


Small business owners - those em¬ 
ployers whose work force is equal to 
500 or less by national definition - will 
receive their just reward May 10-10 as 
Americans celebrate National Small 
Business Week. 

But who are the small business own¬ 
ers? Why are they important? Here 
are just a few reasons: 

General 

There are approximately 15.4 mil¬ 
lion non-farm businesses in the Un¬ 
ited States. Of these. 99 percent are 
small by size standards set by the U.S. 
Small Business Administration. Ab¬ 
out half of the 15 million non-farm 
small businesses operate full-time, 
the rest part-time. 

The number of small businesses 
had increase 23 percent in the last de¬ 
cade. In 1^78, there were about 12.2 
million small businesses. 

The number of small businesses has 
increased steadily during the past 30 
years. In 1985, new business incor¬ 
porations reached a record 669,000 - 
29 percent more than recorded five 
years earlier. During the first half of 
Fiscal Year 1986, new business incor¬ 
porations totaled 300.561 as opposed to 
281,740 for the first half of Fiscal Year 
1985. This represents a 6.7 percent im¬ 
provement. 

The most recent statistics show that 
Fiscal year 1986 began as a very good 
year for small business. For the first 
quarter of Fiscal Year 1986. small 
business income, as measured by that 
of sole proprietorships and part¬ 
nerships. was $169.3 billion as 
opposed to $162.3 billion for the same 
period in Fiscal year 1985, represent¬ 
ing a 3.9 percent increase. 

Small businesses employ 47 percent 
of the private work force, contribute 
42 percent of all sales in the country, 
and are responsible for 38 percent of 
the gross national product. 

Women and ethnic minorities have 
both greatly benefited during this re¬ 
cent period of economic growth. 

From 1977 to 1983 - the latest years 
of available data - the number of 
women-owned businesses increased 
by 9.4 percent annually, considerably 
above the 4.3 percent growth rate of 
receipts of women-owned businesses 
which from 1977 through 1983 rose 
three time greater for women-owned 
firms than for men-owned businesses. 

Minority business ownership - 
approximated by the latest data on 
Black- and Hispanic-owned 
businesses - has also rapidly in¬ 
creased in recent years. Black-owned 
businesses increased from 231.203 in 
1977 to 339,239 in 1982, a 46.7 percent 
increase. Firms owned by Hispanic 
Americans increased to 248,141 in 1982 
from 220,000 in 1977. 

Nearly half of all Federal procure¬ 
ment to minority firms is achieved 
through the 8(a) program. In Fiscal 
Year 1986, 4,057 8(a) contracts were 
awarded for a total of $3.0 billion. 

The fastest growing sectors of the 
small business-dominated industries 
include computer and data proces¬ 
sing services, credit reporting, collec¬ 
tion services and the construction in¬ 
dustry. 


Employment 

Between 1980-1982, the most recent 
period for which there is data on indi¬ 
vidual firms, small business employ¬ 
ment proved a moderating force in 
the 1981-1982 recession. During these 
years, small businesses produced a 
total of 2.65 million new jobs, while 
large businesses were cutting their 
employment by 1.7 million. Thus, all 
of the 984,000 new jobs generated in 
1981-1982 came from small firms. 

Small firms have also led employ¬ 
ment gains through the more recent 
period of economic recovery and ex¬ 
pansion. Between the third quarter of 
1985 and the third quarter of 1986, it is 
estimated there was a 4.5 percent in¬ 
crease in employment in small busi¬ 
ness-dominated industries while 
there was no growth among large 
business-dominated industries. 

Under a broad definition - a defini¬ 
tion which includes not only persons 
running a business full-time but also 
those doing so part-time - about 13 
million Americans are engaged in 
some entrepreneurial activity. These 
13 million entrepreneurs represent 
about 14 percent of all nonagricultu- 
ral workers in the United States. Part- 
time entrepreneurs have increased 
fivefold in recent years. 

Jobs generated by small firms are 
more likely to be filled by younger 
workers, older workers and women. 
Many of these workers prefer or are 
only able to work on a part-time basis 

(See page 14 ) 



HELEN IVORY 


GET THE WOMAN’S 
VIEWPOINT 

MOVING? 

• your exhibit? 

• your office? 

• your home? 

• your valuable records? 

TALK TO HELEN 
BOOTH 609 



PHOENIX - IVORY 
MOVING & STORAGE 
24200 GIBSON 
WARREN, Ml 48089 

757-5420 OR 642-4511 


DON'T MISS THE LARGEST 
DISPLAY AT THE BUSINESS 
EXPO!! 


THE INFINITY 





AVAILABLE FOR TOURS DURING EXPO HOURS ON 
COBO HALL RIVER FRONT. 

GREAT FOR CORPORATE PARTIES, CONFERENCES, 
FUND RAISERS, SEMINARS OR SPECIAL OCCASIONS. 

Visit Booth No. 402-B for Boarding Pass. 

(313) 778-7030 


Make this the summer you do it. 
Make it the summer yau charter 
a cruise on one of Detroit's finest 
yachts — The Infinity, The Helene 
or ^en the Brownies III. We con 
moke it happen. Give us o coll. 





"We're making waves in Detrait" 
( 313 ) 778 - 7030 , 

24400 E. Jefferson St. Olair Shores Michigan 48080 




ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC MAY 13. 1987 PAGE 13 
























DETROIT SPRING '87 


MICKEY SHORE 

mobile electronics 

THE MIDWEST'S LEADER 
IN CELLULAR TELEPHONE 
SALES AND INSTALLATION. 

AN AUTHORIZED CELLULAR ONE AGENT 
FEATURING: 

• AUDIOVOX 

• AT&T 

• MITSUBISHI 
0 JOHNSON 

STARTING AT *499™ COMPLETE 
STOP BY BOOTH #615 


(313)362-2727 

SHORR ELECTRONICS 
TROY, Ml 



WEADOW BROOK 
WUSIC EESTIVAL 


YOUR BEST VALUE 
FOR THE BEST LIVE 
' ENTERTAINMENT! 

Visit our booth 726) 

Ask us about Group Sales and Season Subscriptions 

Box Office 
Theatre 
377-3300 
Festival 

Cultural pro^ams of 377 2100 

Oakland University 



Entreprenuers 


and thus can be more easily 
accommodated by small employers. 

Small businesses provide about 67 
percent of initial job opportunities 
and thus are responsible for most of 
the initial on-the-job training in basic 
skills. 

Financing 

Reflecting the relative health of 
small firms during the recent period 
of economic recovery, small business 
borrowing has remained strong over 
the past few years. While small busi¬ 
ness borrowing declined slightly dur¬ 
ing the first three quarters of Fiscal 
Year 1985 ($70 billion as opposed to $78 
billion for the same period of Fiscal 


(Continued from page 13) 

Year 1984) small business growth con¬ 
tinued at a steady rate. 

For most start up firms and “mom- 
and-pop’’ operations, owners’ capital 
is the most important source of 
financing. About 30 to 40 percent of 
established small businesses relied 
on owner financing during 1983, the 
latest year for which data is avail¬ 
able. 

Other sources of financing include 
venture capital investors, commer¬ 
cial banks, savings institutions and 
loans made by finance companies 
which are secured by working capital 
assets. 


Small Business Week set 


The 15 million small business own¬ 
ers in the country will receive special 
honors during National Small Busi¬ 
ness Week, May 10-16. 

Highlight of the week activities will 
be the selection of the small business 
person of the year. That selection will 
be made from among small business 
men and women chosen as outstand¬ 
ing entrepreneurs in the 50 states, the 
District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. 

National Small Business Week is 
proclaimed annually by the President 
as a way to pay special tribute to 
small business owners. The first 
Small Business Week was proclaimed 
in 1964. 


The U.S. Small Business Adminis¬ 
tration coordinates Small Business 
Week activities. 

SBA Administrator James Abdnor 
noted that this year’s theme is “Small 
Business: America’s Growth Indus¬ 
try.’’ and said the “theme is certainly 
appropriate, because our small busi¬ 
ness owners have been responsible 
for most of the nation’s.job growdh in 
both recession and economic prosper¬ 
ity. Moreover, small business creates 
two out of every three new jobs in our 
country, offers the most job training 
by far and employs the most young, 
elderly and female workers. 



NEW GROWTH 
MANAGEMENT SERVICES 


THE BOTTOM LINE IS TO INCREASE PROFITS 


WE SPECIALIZE IN PERSONNEL, MANAGEMENT, AND 
SALES DEVELOPMENT. 

Some areas affected are: 

Time Management 
Sales Skills 
Attitude Motivation 

STOP BY BOOTH 709 
or call 
881-3765 


PAGE 14 MAY 13, 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS, INC 



























DETROIT SPRING '87 


List of Exhibitors 


A 

#444 - A. DEAN WATKINS 

#000 • ABSOLUTE AIR 

#530 - ACCURATE TIME RECORDER 

#536 - ADAMS LIFE ENHANCEMENT 
PROGRAMS 

#713 - ADVANCED PRINTWEAR 
#000 - ALBIN BUSINESS COPIERS 
#120-ALS 

#411 • AMERICAN LEGAL ACCESS SYS¬ 
TEMS, INC. 

#323 - AMERICAN PHOTOCOPY 
#000 - AMERICAN REFLEXA 
#536 - AMWAY GRAND PLAZA HOTEL 
#808 - ANTI CRUELTY ASSOCIATION 
#329 - ART MORAN VIXEN - 

#812 - ARTISTRY IN PHOTOGRAPHY INC. 
#710 - ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS 
#441 - ASTON MARTIN UNLIMITED 


#742 - AUTO ONE ACCESSORIES AND 
GLASS - 

B 

#000 - BADGEH’S ELECTRONICS 

#000 - BARRISTER INFORMATION SYS¬ 
TEMS 

#000 - BEHER BUSINESS BUREAU 
#512 -BIRMINGHAM THEATRE 
#708 - BOOTH AMERICAN 
#143 - BRESSER CO. 

#501 BRINKS HOME SECURITY, INC. 
#000 - B.S.B. COMMUNICATIONS 
#133 - BUDGET RENT A CAR OF DETROIT 

#540 - BURNETT DIRECT 
#122 -BUSINESS SAVERS INC. 

c 

#625 - C & G PUBLISHING 
#106 - CTS/UNITEL 


#000 - CADEX SYSTEMS CORP. 

#000 - CELLNET 

#615 - CELLULAR ONE 

#000 - CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIV¬ 
ING 

#509 - CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY 

#000 - CENTURY RAIN AID 

#340 - CERTIFIED PRODUCTS & SUPPLY, 
INC. 


#201B-CHIRRI&SONS 

#116 - CIRCLE COMMUNICATIONS 

#730 - CLARION HOTEL AND CONFER¬ 
ENCE CENTER 

#624 - CLEARY COLLEGE 

#000 - COLOR WORKSHOP 


#000 - COMMAND COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

#642 - COMPUTER CONSULTING - by 
BRUCE SHERMAN, MBA, CDP 


#825 - COMPUTER LEARNING CENTERS 


#612 - COMPUTER SECURITY COMPANY, 
A DIVISION OF XBF 

#000 - CONDURA CARTON & PACKAG¬ 
ING 

#827 - CONTACTS INFLUENTIAL/LEAD- 
SOURCE 

#611 - CON TEMPRA 

#130-CONTRACT ^INTERIORS 

#729 - CONVENTION/VISITORS BUREAU 
OF GREATER LANSING 

#000 - COPY DUPLICATING PRODUCTS, 
INC. 

#433-CRAIG RICHARD INC. 

#405 - CRAIN’S DETROIT BUSINESS 
#601 - CREATE-A-SIGN 

D 

#508 - D.O.C. OPTICS CORPORATION 
#610 - D & M PAINTING • 

#513 - DSL COMPUTERS 

#425 - DANA COMMERCIAL CREDIT 

#829 - DETROIT COUNTRY DAY 


OFFICE FURNITURE DIRECT 
FROM THE FACTORY 

Contemporary Desks By 

Paoli 




LOCK 
SINESS 

identity;; 


Make an “Instant 
Impact” with advertising 
specialties and business gifts. 


WHEN YOU NEED OFFICE FURNITURE, YOU NEED 
GUARDIAN SYSTEMS 

RELIABLE SERVICE 

• Immediate Delivery 

• Construction Services 

• Space Planning 

• Trade-In Service 

• Delivery & Set-up 

QUALITY PRODUCTS 

• Name Brands 

• Wood or Metal 

• Budget to Fine 

• Modular Systems 

• Computer Furniture 

LEASING AVAILABLE 

★ Costs a fraction of buying or renting 
★ 100°o Deductible ★ 10% Buyout 

• In-house for lowest cost 


Guardian Systems, Inc. 
313-422-3840 


P.O. BOX 1072 


BIRMINGFIAM, Ml 48010 


SHOW SPECIAL 

COLORED IRONSTONE MUGS 
LIMITED TIME OFFER! 



SEE US AT 
BOOTH #441 



^ 1.89 

144 Min. 


Price includes: 

One color innprint on both sides, 
set-up is extra. F.O.B Factory, 
Offer expires May 22, 1987. 


We offer a COMPLETE promotions service. 

Caii us today for ideas for your next: 

• TRADE SHOW • GOLF OUTING 

• SALES MEETING ' • COMPANY PICNIC 

• EMPLOYEE ' • BUSINESS GIFT 

RECOGNITION & GIVING 

INCENTIVE 

PROGRAMS 

24001 SOUTHFIELD RD. ^STON 
SOUTHFIELD. Ml 48075 

(313) 557-8881 /FIAKTIN 

MMMMM MMM 

ADVERTISING SPECIALTY MARKETING PROGRAMS/BUSINESS GIFTS 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC MAY 13. 1987 PAGE 15 





























kr 




PRIME BUSINESS LOCATIONS 
LANSING, MICHIGAN 


Long Development Inc. is presenting in Booth #728 of 
the Detroit Business Expo. 


WESTLAND INDUSTRIAL PARK 


A 178-acre state-of-the-art business and industrial park 
2,000 ft to 20,800 so. ft of prime industrial sj^ce 
immediately available for lease. 


DELHI VILLAGE SQUARE 

A pleasant combination of retail and office suites located in 
Holt 1/2 block south of Lansing’s city limits. Appealing to 
both suburban and urban clientele — 1,250 sq. ft. to 
15,000 sq. ft available in November. 



Long Development, Inc. 

Properly Developmeni 
and Leasing; Division 


(517) 694-8147 


Help us find the recipient of WCAR’S “CITIZEN OF 
THE YEAR” award. If you know of someone who has 
been helpful to others, send in their name and a brief 
explanation of their good deeds to: 

“Citizen Of The Year” 

WCAR-RADIO 
CN-WCAR 
Livonia, MI 48151 

The recipient will be awarded a (chauffeured) dinner for 
four at the beautiful RISTORANTE DI MODESTA and 
$100,00 in gift certificates to LAVDA’S JEWELERS 
and WALTER’S HOME APPLIANCE. 

Winner will be selected by WCAR and announced on June 
1, 1987 ... so hurry! 


iwo m i mic 

1090A/& INFORMATIVE LISTENING 


(Continued from previous page) 

#608 - DETROIT PISTONS 

#605 - DETROIT’S SECRET 
#533 - DICTAPHONE 
#525 - DINING OUT 

#635 - DISCOUNT CELLULAR-TOP OF 
THE LINE 

#123 - DIVERSIFIED BUSINESS PRO¬ 
DUCTS 

#541 - DUN & BRADSTREET 
#521 - DYNAMIC DISPLAYS 


#000 - EQUITY LEASING AND FINANCING 
#826 - EXECUTIVE SERVICE 
#534 - EXECUTONE 


F 


#000 • FIRST INVESTORS 
#824 - 14 KARAT UNLIMITED 


G 


E 


#101 - EAGLE DATA 

#000 - EAGLE SECURITY 

#000- EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY 

#409 - EATON FINANCIAL 

#000 - EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE SER¬ 
VICE 

#527 - ENCYCLOPEDIA BRITANNICA 

#118 - ENGRAVING CONNECTION/OVA- 
TION 

#200-ENTECH 


#000 - GARY’S AERIAL BANNER 
#000 - GENERAL BINDING CORP. 
#421 - GOVERNOR INFO PRODUCTS 
#402B - GREAT WATER YACHTS 
#607 - GREEN PUNT DESIGN 
#000 - GUARDIAN SYSTEMS, INC. 


H 


#813 - HAMILTON LEGATO & ASSOC. 
#000 - HEMPHILL PUBLICATION 
#923, 925 - HENDERSON GUSS 
#641 - HI-TECH REPORTING SERVICES 


What do meeting planners say when they learn they COULD have held their meetings at the. . 



/WCKimC HOTEL 

AND CONFERENCE 
CENTER ON MACKINAC 
ISLAND. MICHKiAN 


★ 30-Plus Meetintg Rooms ★ i.ooo Seat Conference Center 

★ Main Lodge or Georgian Wing Accommodations 
(including Jacuzzi suites) 

★ 575-Seat Theatre ★ Complete Sound Stage 

★ Movie & Video Production Facilities 
★ Outdoor Heated Pool 

★ Hot Tubs ★ Exercise Room ★ Tennis Courts 

They usually say something like. “Oh FUDGE". 

Call or write for group bookings, so instead of saying it. you 'll be EATING it! 

STOP BY BOOTH #811 

mrnmQ hotel 

AND CONFERENCE CENTER 
Mackinac Island, MI 49757 
Detroit Sales Office - (3I3) 353-0260 


PAGE 16 MAY 13. 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC 
























DETROIT SPRING '87 


(Continued from previous page) 

#511 ■ HOTEL PONTCHARTRAIN 

#532 - HOTSY'C.E. SALES & SERVICE, 
INC. 

I 

#526 - IDS FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. 
#629 - IMAGES DESIGN 
#000 - IMAGE PERFECT 
#734 - IMPULSE CO. 

#732 • INFO-PRO ASSOCIATES 
#429 • INTERIOR DESIGN ASSOCIATES 
#810 - INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 

K 

#000 - KEEGO & CO. 

L 

#000 - UKES OF THE NORTH 
#613-LAKES INCORPORATED 

#435 - LEADER BUSINESS SYSTEMS 


#621 - LEVEL 4 PRODUCTS INC. 

#000 - LIVING WELL LADY 
#728 - LONG DEVELOPMENT, INC. 

#000 - LOWRY COMPUTER PRODUCT 

M 

#811 - MACKINAC HOTEL AND CONFER¬ 
ENCE CENTER 

#335 - MAINS ENTERPRISES 

#000 - MARYGROVE COLLEGE 

#215 - MC MILLAN BROS. OFFICE OUT- 
FIHERS 

#726 - MEADOW BROOK THEATRE AND 
MUSIC FESTIVAL 

#240 - MEGATREND TELECOMMUNICA¬ 
TIONS 

#528 - MEL ANNIS & ASSOCIATES 
#000 - MERCHANT CASH REGISTER 
#000 - MESC 

#244 - METRO COMMUNICATIONS 

#103 - METROPOLITAN CENTER FOR 
HIGH TECHNOLOGY 


#107 - METROPOLITAN OFFICE EQUIP¬ 
MENT CO., INC. - 

#141 - METRO TRADING ASSOCIATION 

#000 ■ MICHIGAN PARAPROFESSIONAL 
TRAINING INST. 

#000 - MICHIGAN TELEPHONICS 

#114 - MICHIGAN TRADE EXCHANGE 

#606 - MICHIGAN OPERA THEATRE COM¬ 
MUNITY PROGRAMS 

#000 - MICHIGAN REHAB SERVICE 

#529 - MICRO BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 

#725 - MICRO RENTAL USA 
#000 - MOBILE TRONICS, INC. 

#515 - MONARCH PRESS 
#242 - MULTI-CITY MARKETING, INC. 
#000 - MULTIGARD/AUDIO ALERT 
#124-MV SOFTWARE 

N 

#828 - NAWBO - NATIONAL ASSOCIA¬ 
TION OF WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS 

#000 - NBI RESOURCE DATA 


#709 - NEW GROWTH MANAGEMENT 
SERVICES 

#000 - NORTH AMERICAN INSTERSTATE 
COIN PHONES 

#300 - NORTHWEST OFFICE SUPPLY, 
INC. 

#724 - NUTRITIONAL CONSULTATION 
SERVICES 

o 

#415 - OFFICE AUTOMATION 

#524 - OMC - OFFICE MANAGMENT CON¬ 
SULTANTS 

P 

#400 - PACE MEMBERSHIP WAREHOUSE 

#413 - PAGE NET 

#000 - PAY PHONE ONE, INC. 

#000 - P.C.P. DATA SERVICES 

#000 - PEOPLE AGAINST TOBACCO 
SMOKE 

#609 - PHOENIX-IVORY MOVING COM¬ 
PANY 

#630-634 - PITNEY BOWES 
#500 - PIX-A-FLIX 


_ _ _ _ _ ^ 

SONITRQI 

security/communications 

1. 


• Security Systems 

• Access Control Systems 

• Telecommunications Systems - 

• Video Serveillance Systems 

See us at Business Expo Booth #640 

16143 WYOMING AVE. 
DETROIT, Ml 48221 

(313) 342-2600 


COLLEGE PREP 
LIBERAL ARTS 


Booth No, 829 



DETROIT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

OFFERS A CHALLENGING GURRICULUM, 
EXTENSIVE SPORTS PROGRAM, 
EXPERT PERSONAL GUIDANGE 
AND 

COLLEGE COUNSELING PROGRAMS 


CALL US OR VISIT FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 


MAPLE ROAD CAMPUS VILLAGE CAMPUS MAIN CAMPUS 

Lower School Junior Sctuwl Ul^per & Middle Schoob 

Pre K ' Grade 2 Grades . 3-5 Grades 6-12 

3003 West Maple Road 3600 Bradway Boulevard 22305 West Thirteen Mile Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 48010 Birmingham, Michigan 48010 Birmingham, Michigan 48010 
433-1050 647^2522 646-7717 


ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC. MAY 13. 1987 PAGE 17 





















DETROIT IScUineu-S^fiA SPRING '87 


Protect and 
store all your 
vital records 
in one place. 
At one price. 


The place? Your own office. Skip 
tlie expense, duplicated effoil. 
uncertainties, and mconvenience of 
ofl-site storage. Have all your 
recoi'ds on hand and protected. 

Tlie price? A modest one-time 
investment tliat includes a lifetime 
waiTanty. 


Tlie product? 


FireKing. Choose 


firepi'oof files or 


data safes with the 


featiu'es you want in 


a size and style that 

-- 

Qts youi' offices’. 


Let us show you 

iid 

the many ways 


FireKing can protect 

<e 


your recoi'ds and 
your business. 


FireKing 

7/i.- I„ <l n . 

jimlrfUtni itot * >111 t 

GB 


Mi 


SEE US AT 
BOOTH #215 


mclTlillanBros. 

Office Outfitters 

OFFICE SUPPLIES • OFFICE FURNITURE • OFFICE SYSTEMS 

DETROIT • MICHIGAN 
Phort 875-3375 


(Continued from previous page) 

#315 • PORTERFIELD WILSON PONTIAC 
CMC TRUCK, INC. 

#505 ■ PREMIER CENTER 


R 


#504 ■ RAINBOW COMPUTERS 

#633 - RAM COMMUNICATIONS 

#531 - RENAISSANCE LEASING/RENT A 
BEAST 

#000 - ROBB DALTON & ASSOCIATES 
#301 - RODNICK BROTHERS 


#615 • SHORR ELECTRONICS 

#108A - SKANDIA INTERIORSCAPE 

#627 - SKY LINE DISPLAYS/MICHIGAN 

#000 - SKY SEARCHERS SATELLITE/ 
OPPORTUNITY CALLING 

#427 - SLIDEMASTERS 

#930-932 - SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOP¬ 
MENT CENTER 


#510 • UNIGLOBE TRAVEL (MICHIGAN) 
INC. 

#113 - UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE 


#104 -UNITED STATES TELEPHONE 
CORP. 

#431 - UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT 


#637 - SYSTEC 


V 


s 


'MW Dining 

Out 


presents 

25 FREE MEALS AT 
25 OF THE AREA’S 
FINEST RESTAURANTS 

MEMBERSHIP CARD ONLY *4.95 
RETAIL AND *2.09 WHOLESALE 
WITH QUANTITY PURCHASE OF 
300 OR MORE! 

• CORPORATE GIFTS 
• CORPORATE INCENTIVES 
• FUND RAISERS • SALES - DOOR OPENERS 
SEE US AT BOOTH #525 

DINING OUT, 15565 NORTHLAND DRIVE 
SUITE 107W, SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48075 

A Division of ATLAS Industries, Ltd. 


T 


#502 - SAFEGUARD BUSINESS SYSTEMS 
#201A-SAVIN 

#727 - SCHOSTAK BROS. & CO. 

#640 - SECURITY CONTROLS, INC. 

#712 - SEUH 

#731-735 - SELECTIVE COPY MACHINES 

#740 - SERVICO-TROY HILTON, NFLD. 
HILTON, SFLD. HILTON, AIRPORT HIL 
TON, Ml INN - 

#000 - SEVEN STAR, INC. - 


#440 - T-COM PAGING 

#000 - TELEPHONE SUPPORT SYSTEMS 

#341A-THE CHAHERBOX 

#505 - THOMAS’ CRYSTAL GARDENS 

#000 - TIME CHEMICAL SANITATION 

#000 - TIMESAVERS COMPUTER SER¬ 
VICE 

#341B - TRANS PACIFIC LEARNING SYS¬ 
TEMS 

#000 - TRAVEL CLUB INTI. 


#000 - VELGER MARINE 
#000 - VIC TANNY 
#000 - VIDEO INTL. 
#000 - VIDEO VENDOR 
#108B - VITEX 


w 


#338 - WAREHOUSE CLUB 

#711 - WAYNE COUNTY OFFICE ON 
AGING 


Y 


U 


#000 - ULTRA BRITE 


#110 - YATES OFFICE PRODUCTS 
#626 - YE OLDE COFFEE 
#628 - YMCA 






CROSS-INDEX 
DIRECTORY 

Over 4 Million Listings in 825 Cities and Towns 
CROSS REFERENCED BY 
ADDRESS AND TELEPHONES 


A Must for. 

• Sales 
Prospecting 


• Deliveries 
• Collections 
• Credit 
• Auditing 
• Skip Tracing 












v 


v 



Call or write to lind out what Bresser 's can do lor you. 


SEE US AT BOOTH #143 


Cross-Index Directory Co. 

^ 684 W. Baltimore, Detroit, Ml 48202 (313) 874-0570 


j.v 


PAGE 18 MAY 13, 1987 ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS. INC